• ACI Technical Report: Initial Measures Derived from Census

      Langworthy, Robert H. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2006-06-09)
      The decennial census provides a wealth of information about communities that has been mined by social scientist for decades. The purpose of this technical report is to describe an initial set of measures taken from or derived from the 2000 U.S. Census in an effort to develop a statistical description of Anchorage communities for use with the Anchorage Community Indicators project of the University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center. The initial set of measures isolated from census are inspired by two principal bodies of work: (1) the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods, an exceptionally well endowed research effort that took neighborhood measurement very seriously; and, (2) Peter Blau’s work that specifies parameter of social structure, heterogeneity, and inequality. The focus of the paper is on documenting how the measures were formed from 2000 Summary File 3 census tables. However, measures without conceptual content are of little value. Accordingly, the paper will offer a brief introduction to the derivative works (PHDCN, Blau) and then follow with a fairly detailed presentation of each measure (what concept is addressed, how it is measured, how the measure is distributed across block group and census tracts, and isolation of the census tables providing essential counts).
    • AJiC Tableau Dashboard Style Guide

      Payne, Troy C.; Kisarauskas, Yevgenii; Slone, Avram; Gonzalez, Andrew (2020-09-02)
      This document describes the broad design and style conventions of Alaska Justice Information Center (AJiC) Tableau data dashboards. This document is meant as a style guide, and deviations from the general guidelines may be necessary for specific projects. Design goals and styles for every part of a dashboard are presented in the document.
    • Alaska Victimization Survey: Detailed Responses to Intimate Partner Violence and Sexual Violence Questions

      Rosay, André B.; Rivera, Marny; Myrstol, Brad A.; Wood, Darryl S. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2011-04-07)
      This brief paper presents survey questions used in the Alaska Victimization Survey on experience of intimate partner violence and sexual violence. Weighted results of reported victimization by respondents are also given. The Alaska Victimization Survey, designed to establish a baseline for estimates of intimate partner and sexual violence, is modeled after the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS) of the Centers for Disease Control (CDC).
    • All-Alaska Rate Electric Power Pricing Structure

      Fay, Ginny; Meléndez, Alejandra Villalobos (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2012-03)
      Economists at the Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage were asked to research the potential options and impacts of establishing an All-Alaska Rate as an alternative to the current Power Cost Equalization (PCE) program funding formula. We were asked to provide a history of the PCE program and information on electricity rates and patterns of consumption across regions of Alaska. This report provides the results of this analysis. Alaska is unique in many ways, including its consumption and pricing of electricity. There are large regional differences in consumption and prices that result from proximity to different types and quantities of resources. Differences in remoteness and population size also influence costs. Urban areas in the southern Railbelt benefit from larger economies of scale and access to natural gas and hydroelectric resources; the majority of hydroelectric facilities are located in Southcentral and Southeast Alaska. Most communities in rural Alaska depend on volatile and high price fossil fuels for the generation of electricity. The Alaska statewide weighted average residential rate for electricity (17.6 cents per kilowatt (kWh) in CY2011) is higher than the U.S. average of 11.8 cents per kWh (U.S. EIA, 2012). Alaska now trails behind Hawaii (34.5 cents), New York (18.4 cents) and Connecticut (18.1 cents) based on ranking of average residential price per kWh. Hidden in the Alaska statewide average is considerable variation with some communities paying less than the national average and some paying considerably more.
    • Anchorage Community Indicators: Public Use Data Files

      Langworthy, Robert H. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2006-06-09)
      The Anchorage Community Survey is a biannual study conducted by the Justice Center at the University of Alaska Anchorage as a principal component of the Community Indicators Project at UAA. As the premier source of data on Anchorage Community Indicators, the ACS also provides insight into the communities of Anchorage, Girdwood and Eagle River. This document explains the various SPSS datasets, collection methods, and variables of the 2005 Anchorage Community Survey (https://scholarworks.alaska.edu/handle/11122/3729).
    • Building Evaluation Capacity for Gender-Specific Programming

      Schafer, N. E.; Rosay, André B. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2003-10)
      This report provides a basis for future evaluations of gender-specific caseloads in Alaska and provides materials which to help in formulating future programs and evaluations. Three tasks were involved in setting a base for future evaluations of the program: reviewing recent literature on female delinquency and gender-specific programming; developing a local resource manual of services for girls and young women in the Anchorage area; and establishing baseline data on female delinquency in Alaska, with particular focus on female delinquency in Anchorage.
    • Data Survey and Sampling Procedures to Quantify Recreation Use of National Forests in Alaska

      Fay, Ginny; Colt, Steve; White, Eric (U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station, 2010)
      Estimating visitor numbers and collecting information on visitor attitudes in Alaska national forests is especially challenging because of the dispersed access to the forests by a relatively small number of visitors. The Tongass and Chugach National Forests are each millions of acres with miles of saltwater coastline and numerous lakes that allow almost infinite boat and float plane access points. This study identified a number of methods used by land managers in Alaska and other states to address dispersed recreational access as well as other ongoing data collection processes in Alaska, such as sport fish angler surveys, traveler surveys, and other systematic efforts that generate visitor data. These data may be useful for USDA Forest Service efforts to improve their visitor use monitoring processes.
    • Economic Analysis of an Integrated Wind-Hydrogen Energy System for a Small Alaska Community

      Colt, Steve; Gilbert, Steve (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2008-12)
      Wind-hydrogen systems provide one way to store intermittent wind energy as hydrogen. We explored the hypothesis that an integrated wind-hydrogen system supplying electricity, heat, and transportation fuel could serve the needs of an isolated (off-grid) Alaska community at a lower cost than a collection of separate systems. Analysis indicates that: 1) Combustible Hydrogen could be produced with current technologies for direct use as a transportation fuel for about $15/gallon-equivalent; 2) The capital cost of the wind energy rather than the capital cost of electrolyzers dominates this high cost; and 3) There do not appear to be diseconomies of small scale for current electrolyzers serving a a village of 400 people.
    • Economic Feasibility of North Slope Propane Production and Distribution to Select Alaska Communities

      Schwörer, Tobias; Fay, Ginny (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2010-06)
      Could propane from Alaska’s North Slope reduce energy costs for electric utilities and residential space heating, water heating, and cooking demands? We explored the hypothesis that propane is a viable alternative for fourteen selected communities along the Yukon and Kuskokwim Rivers, coastal Alaska, and Fairbanks. Our analysis forecasts propane and fuel prices at the wholesale and retail levels by incorporating current transportation margins with recent analysis on Alaska fuel price projections. Annual savings to households associated with converting to propane from fuel oil can be up to $1,700 at $60 per barrel (bbl) of crude oil, and amount to $5,300 at $140 per barrel.1 Fairbanks residents would benefit from switching to propane for all applications at crude oil prices of $60/bbl. Interesting to note is that switching to propane for domestic water heating makes more sense at lower oil prices than conversions for home space heating. Three of the fourteen communities are projected to benefit from switching to propane for home heating at crude oil prices greater than $80 per barrel, and four communities at crude oil prices of more than $110/bbl. On the other hand, nine communities would benefit from conversion to propane for water heating as crude oil prices reach $50 and above. The realized household savings are also sensitive to assumptions surrounding the operating cost of the production facility and barge transportation delivery costs.
    • Factors Influencing Success of Wind-Diesel Hybrid Systems in Remote Alaska Communities: Results of an Informal Survey

      Fay, Ginny; Udovyk, Nataliya (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2011-10)
      In 2008 the Alaska State Legislature created and funded the Renewable Energy Fund. As a result of this available funding, the number of wind-diesel hybrid power systems is increasing dramatically in rural Alaska. Development, integration, and operation of complex wind technologies in remote, rural communities are challenging. With multiple communities in Alaska installing and operating these systems, it is important to understand the factors that influence successful completion, operation and long-term maintenance of projects (Fay, Schwoerer and Keith 2010; Colt, Goldsmith and Wiita 2003). As of fall 2011, over $107 million has been spent constructing wind projects in 27 communities (Alaska Energy Authority 2011). The majority of these systems were built since 2008 and utilized $50.8 million in appropriations from the REF by the Alaska legislature (Fay, Crimp and Villalobos-Melendez 2011) This report summarizes the findings of an informal survey conducted on the most important characteristics of a successful wind-diesel hybrid power project in small remote rural communities. The survey was done to help guide socioeconomic research in Alaska on community capacity under a U.S. Department of Energy project entitled “Making Wind Work for Alaska: Supporting the Development of Sustainable, Resilient, Cost-Effective Wind-Diesel Systems for Isolated Communities”.
    • Getting started with the ContentDM Project Client Part 1: The things you need to do ahead of time

      Schmuland, Arlene B. (2021-03-02)
      This is the first part of a five-step tutorial on setting up the software for participation in the Alaska's Digital Archives project. It describes the steps that must be completed before downloading the software. Part 2 is installing the software, Part 3 is Creating a project, Part 4 is Setting up a project, Part 5 is Adding files to a project.
    • Getting started with the ContentDM Project Client Part 2: installing the software

      Schmuland, Arlene B. (2021-03-03)
      This is the second part of a five-step tutorial on setting up the software for participation in the Alaska's Digital Archives project. It describes the steps to download and install the software. Part 1 is the steps that must be complete prior to installing the software, Part 3 is Creating a project, Part 4 is Setting up a project, Part 5 is Adding files to a project.
    • Getting started with the ContentDM Project Client part 3: Creating a project

      Schmuland, Arlene B. (2021-03-03)
      This is the third part of a five-step tutorial on setting up the software for participation in the Alaska's Digital Archives project. It describes the steps that must be completed to create a project: the function within the ContentDM software that allows you to attach metadata to files. Part 1 is the steps that must be complete prior to installing the software, Part 2 is installing the software, Part 4 is Setting up a project, Part 5 is Adding files to a project.
    • Getting started with the ContentDM Project Client Part 4: setting up your project

      Schmuland, Arlene B. (2021-03-02)
      This is the fourth part of a five-step tutorial on setting up the software for participation in the Alaska's Digital Archives project. It describes the steps that must be completed to fill in the default information that will apply to all files added to the project. Part 1 is the steps that must be complete prior to installing the software, Part 2 is installing the software, Part 3 is Creating a project, Part 5 is Adding files to a project.
    • Getting started with the ContentDM Project Client part 5: Adding files to your project

      Schmuland, Arlene B. (2021-03-02)
      This is the fifth part of a five-step tutorial on setting up the software for participation in the Alaska's Digital Archives project. It describes how to add the files (images, audio, documents, etc.,) to a project in preparation for attaching descriptive metadata to those files. Part 1 is the steps that must be complete prior to installing the software, Part 2 is installing the software, Part 3 is Creating a project, Part 4 is Setting up a project.
    • Intimate Partner Violence Against Ahtna (Alaska Native) Women in the Copper River Basin

      Magen, Randy H.; Wood, Darryl S. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2006-07)
      This study examined the frequency, severity, and consequences of intimate partner violence against an availability sample of Athabaskan women (n=91) residing in the interior of Alaska. Data about victimization experiences as well as cultural involvement, residential mobility, living arrangements, social cohesion, alcohol use, and post-traumatic stress were gathered through interviews. Slightly less than two-thirds of respondents (63.7%) reported intimate partner violence victimization at some point in their lifetime. Nearly one out of five women surveyed (17.6%) reported that they had been physically assaulted by an intimate partner in the most recent 12 months. Intimate partner victimization was more prevalant and more frequent when compared to what has been reported by the National Violence Against Women Survey.
    • Measuring Adult Criminal Victimization: Findings from the Anchorage Adult Criminal Victimization Survey

      Giblin, Matthew; Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2003-07)
      Since 1973, the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) has been administered annually to a national sample of households. The survey captures unreported or underreported criminal events that are not available using official crime data such as the Uniform Crime Reports. However, the data collected are most useful in identifying crime trends nationwide. The national scope of the survey makes it impossible to extract crime data for smaller geographic areas, thus limiting its utility for Anchorage residents and policymakers with criminal justice concerns. To compensate for this limitation, the Justice Center at the University of Alaska Anchorage administered a local version of the NCVS during second quarter 2002. By surveying adult residents of Anchorage, the project, titled the Anchorage Adult Criminal Victimization Survey (AACVS), generated a wealth of information on crime victimization, neighborhood conditions, fear, and policing in Anchorage. This report presents the results of the AACVS.
    • Port of Anchorage TIGER II BCA Model

      Goldsmith, Oliver Scott; Schwörer, Tobias (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2011-08-17)
    • Power Cost Equalization Funding Formula Review

      Fay, Ginny; Meléndez, Alejandra Villalobos; Schwörer, Tobias (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2012-03)
      The purpose of this study is to examine the current Power Cost Equalization (PCE) program formula’s impacts on incentives for implementation of energy efficiency and renewable energy measures. In addition, it examines if alternative formula structures might improve market signals that are more conducive to investment in energy efficiency and renewable energy in rural Alaska. As part of the analysis we also present information on the history of the PCE program and levels and patterns of electricity consumption across regions of Alaska. Alaska has large regional and intra-regional differences in energy consumption and prices that result from a number of factors including proximity to different types and quantities of resources, community population, remoteness, and transportation costs. Most communities in rural Alaska depend on volatile and high priced fossil fuels for the generation of electricity, space heating and transportation. The Alaska statewide weighted average residential rate for electricity (17.6 cents per kWh in CY2011) is substantially higher than the U.S. average of 11.8 cents per kWh (U.S. EIA, 2012). Yet in Alaska the average residential rate per kWh is currently lower than in Hawaii (34.5 cents), New York (18.4 cents) and Connecticut (18.1 cents). Hidden in the Alaska statewide average is considerable variation with some communities paying less than the national average and some—generally those least able to afford it—paying among the highest in the country. The Railbelt and Southeast regions have the lowest average residential electric rates (Appendix I map). North Slope residential customers also have lower average rates because of access to natural gas and North Slope Borough energy payments in addition to PCE disbursements. Most other regions have rates two to three times as high as Alaska urban rates. Some communities with hydroelectric power have notably low rates but customers are not paying the full, true cost of power because the cost of construction was heavily subsidized by state and federal governments. In Table 3 (p. 20) we present average annual residential electricity consumption and rates for different regions of Alaska.
    • Recreation and Tourism in South-Central Alaska: Patterns and Prospects prepared for the US Forest Service Pacific Northwest Station

      Tomeo, Martha; Colt, Steve; Martin, Stephanie; Mieren, Jenna (U.S. Department of Agriculture (Forest Service) - Pacific Northwest Research Station, 2002)
      Based on data from various sources, this report describes the extent and nature of recreation and tourism in south-central Alaska. Current activities, past trends, and prospective developments are presented. Particular attention is given to activities that occur on, or are directly affected by management of, the Chugach National Forest. Recreation and tourism in and around the forest are also placed in a larger context. The Chugach National Forest is heavily used as a scenic resource by motorists and waterborne passengers; road access to the forest supports recreation activities such as fishing, camping, hiking, and wildlife viewing. Although the annual rate of increase in visitors to south-central Alaska seems to have slowed in the late 1990s, evidence indicates that currently both visitors and Alaska residents are increasingly seeking active forms of recreation and ?soft adventure.? These demands, combined with likely capacity constraints at well-known attractions in Alaska and entrepreneurial efforts to provide short-duration recreation and tourism experiences, may lead to increasing use of the Chugach National Forest.