• An Exploratory Study of Changes Accompanying the Implementation of a Community-Based, Participatory Team Police Organizational Model

      Angell, John E. (Michigan State University, 1975)
      This exploratory research examines the attitudes of citizens, police clientele, and police in an area where a decentralized, participatory (collegial) team police operation has been implemented, and compares these attitudes with those in a similar neighborhood policed by a classical organizational structure and traditional procedures. The Team Police Model of this study consisted basically of 15 generalist police officers who, with the participation of local citizens, were responsible for defining police goals, priorities and procedures and providing all police services in a precisely defined, low-economic, minority, residential area of Holyoke, Massachusetts for a test period of approximately nine months. The Team used collegial methods for decisionmaking and task forces for performing management functions. The Team followed a "service", rather than "law enforcement" operational philosophy. The control neighborhood was policed by an organization arrangement which was in general consistent with Classical tenets as stated by Max Weber. A traditional "law enforcement" philosophy was used in the Classical neighborhood. The basic assumption underlying this study was police effectiveness in crime prevention and order maintenance is dependent on a supportive public. The primary problem researched was whether public and clientele attitudes toward the police were more supportive in the Team Police than a Classical Police area. Of secondary concern was the impact of the Team Police experiment on police officers attitudes. Perhaps the most important conclusion to be derived from this study is that, contrary to conventional wisdom, the collegial Team Police Model as implemented in this project did not have a negative impact on any variable investigated. The positive impact of the project on most variables supports the value of further research with a community-based, collegial team organizational structure for police services.
    • A Pilot Evaluation of the Performance Diagnostic Checklist for Assessing Employee Satisfaction and Support in Call Centers

      Kiester, Rebekah (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2020-04-13)
      Call center employees play a critical role in providing customer service, and directly influence customer satisfaction and retention (Slowiak, 2014). Determining what variables influence employee satisfaction and performance in call centers is crucial for organizations and businesses to support their employees. The Performance Diagnostic Checklist (PDC) was developed to identify variables that influence employee performance (Austin, 2000). The PDC has been found to be effective in a variety of settings, but a review of the literature indicates it has not been used to assess employee support in financial institutions. This study aims to adapt the PDC for use with employees in a financial institution call center to systematically assess factors related to employee support throughout the department. Results of the study indicate overall high levels of employee support, but indicate the potential for improvement in communication of department performance indicators as well as monitoring and providing clear performance feedback.
    • Reducing Recidivism in Alaska Throough Access to Extended-Release Injectable Naltrexone

      Green, Jyll K. (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-12-01)
      The goal of this evidence-based project was to provide access to extended-release injectable naltrexone (XR-NTX) upon release from incarceration for individuals who had a self-identified substance or alcohol abuse history, and evaluate whether or not XR-NTX reduced recidivism in comparison with those who declined to use XR-NTX. This project was completed in collaboration with Partners Reentry Center, located in Anchorage, Alaska, who collected and offered retrospective de-identified data for this project. A total of 98 individuals with a self-identified history of substance or alcohol abuse were offered XR-NTX through Partners Reentry Center from September 15, 2015 to September 15, 2016. Of these, 52 were offered XR-NTX in the first six months of this evidenced-based quality improvement project. Of those who accepted XR-NTX (n = 32), 62% remained in the community at the end of 12 months from project initiation. Of those who declined XR-NTX (n = 20), 95% recidivated. The results of this project demonstrate the benefit of using XR-NTX in released prisoners to reduce recidivism. Implications for use the of XR-NTX in Alaska Department of Corrections inmates and the general population who meet criteria for use should be evaluated.
    • Young Adult Perceptions of Patient-Provider Interactions in Primary Care

      McCafferty, Kelcie; Howard, Veronica (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2020-09-24)
      The patient-provider relationship may significantly impact a variety of health-related factors, ranging from the experience of chronic pain. (Jonsdottir, Oskarsson, & Jonsdottir, 2016) to overall healthcare outcomes (Beach, Keruly, & Moore, 2006). Patient demographics and previous medical history can influence patient perceptions of providers (Marchland, Palis, & Oviedo-Jones, 2016; Dennison et al., 2019), with previous studies exploring differences in the patient experience as a function of race, ethnicity, gender, location, socioeconomic status, and experience of chronic pain. However, few studies have assessed the interaction of multiple demographic and medical factors with patient perceptions of their interactions with providers. This study evaluated whether young adult patients’ demographic, medical, and gender-related factors were associated with perceptions of their most recent Primary Care Provider (PCP) interaction. Participants were surveyed regarding their medical history, experience of chronic pain, patient trust in physicians, patient-provider depth of relationship, quality of interactions with their PCP, and view the overall healthcare experience. Results indicate that women and participants with chronic pain disorders, mental health disorders, and sexual health disorders reported lower levels of satisfaction with interactions with providers. Moreover, inconsistency between quantitative ratings of recent PCP relationship quality and open-ended qualitative responses indicate a potential lingering effect of prior poor provider interactions on participants’ perceptions of health care providers.