• 1982 Conference on Violence

      UAA Justice Center (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1982-10-11)
      The 1982 Conference on Violence, sponsored by the Justice Center at University of Alaska Anchorage, was held October 11–13, 1982 at the Hotel Captain Cook in Anchorage. The conference was organized around five central themes: violent people, victims of violence, methods of preventing and controlling violence, firearms and violence, and research and public policy concerning violence.
    • 1987 Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act Compliance Monitoring Report

      Parry, David L. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1989-07)
      The Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act (JJDPA) mandates removal of status offenders and nonoffenders from secure detention and correctional facilities, sight and sound separation of juveniles and adults, and removal of juveniles from adult jails and lockups. In Alaska, 32 instances of a status offender held in secure detention were recorded in 1987; by comparison, there were 485 violations in the baseline year of 1976. 806 separation violations were recorded in 1988, representing a 2% reduction from the 1976 baseline if 824 violations. 601 jail removal violations occurred, representing a 30% reduction from the 1980 baseline. The report includes significant discussion of obstacles to Alaska's compliance with JJDPA and measures being taken to overcome those obstacles.
    • 1988 Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act Compliance Monitoring Report

      Parry, David L. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1990-03)
      The Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act (JJDPA) mandates removal of status offenders and nonoffenders from secure detention and correctional facilities, sight and sound separation of juveniles and adults, and removal of juveniles from adult jails and lockups. In Alaska, 7 instances of a status offender held in secure detention were recorded in 1988; by comparison, there were 485 violations in the baseline year of 1976. (An addittional two status offenders held in secure detention satisfied the "valid court order" exception, and were not counted as violations.) 564 separation violations were recorded in 1988, representing a 32% reduction from the 1976 baseline and 30% since the Alaska Division of Family and Youth Services implemented its revised Jail Removal Plan in December 1987. 409 jail removal violations occurred, representing a 53% reduction from the 1980 baseline.
    • 1989 Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act Compliance Monitoring Report

      Read, Emily E.; Schafer, N. E. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1990-12-03)
      The Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act (JJDPA) mandates removal of status offenders and nonoffenders from secure detention and correctional facilities, sight and sound separation of juveniles and adults, and removal of juveniles from adult jails and lockups. In Alaska, two instances of a status offender held in secure detention were recorded in 1989; but both satisfied the "valid court order" exception, so were not counted as violations; by comparison, there were 485 violations in the baseline year of 1976. 336 separation violations were recorded in 1989, representing a 60% reduction from the 1976 baseline and 41% from 1988. 249 jail removal violations occurred, representing a 71% reduction from the 1980 baseline and an 39% reduction from 1988.
    • 1990 Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act Compliance Monitoring Report

      Read, Emily E.; Schafer, N. E. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1991-10)
      The Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act (JJDPA) mandates removal of status offenders and nonoffenders from secure detention and correctional facilities, sight and sound separation of juveniles and adults, and removal of juveniles from adult jails and lockups. In Alaska, no instances of a status offender held in secure detention were recorded in 1990, as compared with 485 violations in the baseline year of 1976. 135 separation violations were recorded in 1990, representing an 84% reduction from the 1976 baseline and 60% from 1989. 99 jail removal violations occurred, representing a 89% reduction from the 1980 baseline and an 60% reduction from 1989.
    • 1991 Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act Compliance Monitoring Report

      Curtis, Richard W.; Schafer, N. E. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1992-10)
      The Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act (JJDPA) mandates removal of status offenders and nonoffenders from secure detention and correctional facilities, sight and sound separation of juveniles and adults, and removal of juveniles from adult jails and lockups. In Alaska, one instance of a status offender held in secure detention was recorded in 1991, as compared with 485 violations in the baseline year of 1976. 65 separation violations were recorded in 1991, representing a 92% reduction from the 1976 baseline and 48% from 1990. 81 jail removal violations occurred, representing a 90% reduction from the 1980 baseline and an 18% reduction from 1990.
    • 1992 Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act Compliance Monitoring Report

      Curtis, Richard W.; Schafer, N. E.; Atwell, Cassie (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1993-10)
      The Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act (JJDPA) mandates removal of status offenders and nonoffenders from secure detention and correctional facilities, sight and sound separation of juveniles and adults, and removal of juveniles from adult jails and lockups. In Alaska, one instance of a status offender held in secure detention was recorded in 1992, as compared with 485 violations in the baseline year of 1976. 11 separation violations were recorded in 1992, representing a 99% reduction from the 1976 baseline and 83% from 1992. 44 jail removal violations occurred, representing a 95% reduction from the 1980 baseline and an 46% reduction from 1992.
    • 1993 Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act Compliance Monitoring Report

      Curtis, Richard W.; Atwell, Cassie; Schafer, N. E. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1994-09)
      The Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act (JJDPA) mandates removal of status offenders and nonoffenders from secure detention and correctional facilities, sight and sound separation of juveniles and adults, and removal of juveniles from adult jails and lockups. In Alaska, no instances of a status offender held in secure detention was recorded in 1993, as compared with 485 violations in the baseline year of 1976. 16 separation violations were recorded in 1992, representing a 98% reduction from the 1976 baseline of 824 violations. 59 jail removal violations were projected, representing a 94% reduction from the 1980 baseline and an 25% increase from 1992.
    • 2004 Census and Survey of Homeless Youths in Homer, Alaska

      Rosay, André B. (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2005-06-01)
      In the spring and summer of 2004, we conducted a homeless youth survey and assessed the services available to these youths in order to identify gaps in services. As we interviewed youths, it became clear that we interviewed youths at vastly different stages of homelessness. At the first stage were youths who had less experience being homeless or had just begun their homeless experience. We categorized these youths as runaways. At the second stage were youths who experienced longer, more extensive, or more intense periods of homelessness. We categorized these youths as chronic homeless youths. Runaway youths became homeless primarily because of problems at home, suggesting a need for greater family counseling in Homer. Runaway youths were also heavily involved in drug and alcohol use, suggesting a need for greater drug and alcohol programming. When runaway youths were directly asked about needed services, most expressed needs for additional recreational activities, particularly in terms of places were youth would be welcome. As homelessness progresses from the runaway stage to the chronic homelessness stage, the needs of homeless youths changed. Once at the chronic homelessness stage, the needs of homeless youths become more focused on employment assistance. Chronic homeless youths were homeless because they simply could not afford housing in Homer due to a lack of meaningful employment with decent pay and benefits. Compared to runaways, it is more difficult for chronic homeless youths to transition back into permanent housing. However, employment assistance would allow these youths to transition back into permanent housing. Results from the services survey indicate that many services are already available to homeless youths in Homer. In particular, the basic physical needs of homeless youths appear to be adequately satisfied. Few youths expressed needs for these services. Youths who did express such needs were able to receive these services and held favorable opinions about the services they had received. However, fewer agencies provided employment assistance, drug and alcohol programming, family counseling, or recreational opportunities to homeless youths. At the same time, these were significant needs expressed either directly or indirectly by the homeless youths surveyed. The recommendations that emerge from this study are therefore to enhance employment assistance (particularly for chronic homeless youths) and to enhance drug and alcohol programming, family counseling, and recreational opportunities (particularly for runaway youths). Employment assistance should be designed to lead youths into productive and meaningful careers that provide enough pay to afford housing. All services should be developed so that they are available during the summer (when youths are out of school) and to all youths, including ones who have stopped going to school. Furthermore, it is critical to keep the costs of these services as low as possible, as most of these youths (and their families) have few financial resources. Finally, more should be done to make available services known to homeless youths, particularly to runaway youths. Although many services are already provided to youths in Homer, most runaway youths were unaware of these services. With help and guidance, all youths can successfully transition back into permanent housing. At the same time, these services may prevent youths from becoming homeless.
    • 2009 Alaska Health Workforce Vacancy Study

      Landon, Beth; Doucette, Sanna; Frazier, Rosyland; Wilson, Meghan; Silver, Darla; Hill, Alexandra; Sanders, Kate; Sharp, Suzanne; Johnson, Kristin; DeRoche, Patricia; et al. (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2009-12)
      Alaska continues to experience health professional shortages. The state has long had a deficient “supply side” characterized by insufficient numbers of key health workers whose recruitment, retention, and training have been impeded by Alaska’s remoteness, harsh climate, rural isolation, low population density, and scarce training resources. Alaska is the only state without a pharmacy school and lacks its own dental and physical therapy schools as well. Health professional shortages can be decreased through the start of new training programs, the expansion of existing programs, and the improvement of the effectiveness of recruitment and retention efforts. However, strategic planning and the execution of such programs require valid and accurate data. To this end, stakeholders such as the Alaska Mental Health Trust Authority (AMHTA) and Alaskan's For Access to Health Care (ACCESS), along with schools and departments within the University of Alaska Anchorage (UAA), funded the Alaska Center for Rural Health-Alaska’s AHEC (ACRH) and the Institute of Social and Economic Research (ISER) to conduct a comprehensive health workforce study during winter and spring of 2009. This report highlights employers’ needs for employees to fill budgeted positions. This is different from a needs assessment that would take into account population demographics and disease incidence and prevalence. This health workforce study is an assessment of health manpower shortage based on budgeted staff positions and their vacancies in organizations throughout the state. Respondents included part-time positions, which resulted in our counting full-time equivalent (FTE) rather than individuals (“bodies”). In situations where a position was divided among more than one occupation (e.g., Dental Assistant and Billing Clerk), we asked the respondent to count the position under which they considered the position’s “primary occupation.” This was a point-in-time cross-sectional study. Recently filled vacancies or imminent vacancies were not counted. Positions filled by relief/temporary/locum/contract health workers were counted as vacancies only if these workers were temporarily filling a currently vacant, budgeted position. Due to budget and time constraints, we were not able to conduct a trend analysis that is a comparison of this study’s findings and the prior 2007 study. The key questions this study sought to answer were (1) How many budgeted positions, either full- or part-time, existed in organizations providing health services in Alaska? (2) How many of these budgeted positions were currently vacant? (3) What was the vacancy rate? (4) How many of the organizations that employ these occupations hired new graduates of training programs? (5) How many of the currently vacant budgeted positions (#2) could be filled by new graduates of training programs? (6) What were the mean and maximum length of time, expressed in months, that the vacancies have existed? (7) What were the principal, underlying causes of vacancies? The study was designed in consultation with an advisory group that included AMHTA, ACCESS, and UAA. The study targeted 93 health occupations. The unit of analysis was the employment site by organization type, which allowed for the allocation of positions and vacancies by geographic region. For each employer, we identified the staff person most knowledgeable about hiring and vacancies. In large organizations this meant that one employer might provide information about multiple sites and organization types; smaller employers were responsible for only a single site.
    • 2010 Alaska Victimization Survey

      Samaniego, Sandy; Morton, Lauree; Rosay, André B.; Myrstol, Brad A.; Rivera, Marny; Wood, Darryl S. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage; Council on Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault, Alaska Department of Public Safety, 2010-09-30)
      This Powerpoint slide presentation presents an overview of key results from the 2010 Alaska Victimization Survey (AVS) for Alaska statewide conducted from May to June 2010, with results released on September 30, 2010 in Anchorage. The study provides the first definitive measures of incidence and prevalence violence against women in Alaska. Findings include: * About 59% of adult women in Alaska have experienced intimate partner violence, sexual violence or both, in their lifetime; * Nearly 12% have experienced intimate partner violence, sexual violence or both, in the past year; * About 37% of adult women in the Alaska have experienced sexual violence in their lifetime; and * About 48% have experienced intimate partner violence in their lifetime.
    • 2010 Alaska Victimization Survey: Report to the Alaska State Legislature

      Rosay, André B.; Morton, Lauree (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage; Council on Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault, Alaska Department of Public Safety, 2011-01-24)
      This Powerpoint slide presentation presents an overview of key results from the statewide Alaska Victimization Survey conducted in 2010, which provides the first definitive measures of the incidence and prevalence of violence against women in Alaska. The study is modeled upon the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Surveillance System (NISVSS) developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in collaboration with the National Institute of Justice and the U.S. Department of Defense.
    • 2010 Anchorage Underage Drinking Survey: A Look at Adult Attitudes, Perceptions, and Norms

      Rivera, Marny; Parker, Khristy; McMullen, Jennifer (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2012-07-12)
      The Anchorage Underage Drinking Survey (AUDS) was conducted to assess adults’ recent exposure to Communities Mobilizing for Change on Alcohol media campaign about underage drinking, as well as adult attitudes, norms, and perceptions regarding the underage drinking problem in Anchorage. Our interest was in understanding community perceptions regarding the extent of the underage drinking problem, underage access to alcohol through social and retail outlets, consequences of underage drinking, and laws and policies designed to reduce underage drinking and the consequences stemming from it. The survey contained six major sections: (1) underage drinking problem, (2) adult influences on underage drinking, (3) alcohol consumption, (4) responses to underage drinking, (5) public service advertisements, and (6) respondent background information.
    • 2013 Alaska's Construction Spending Forecast

      Goldsmith, Oliver Scott; Guettabi, Mouhcine (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2013-02)
      The Construction Industry Progress Fund (CIPF) and the Associated General Contractors (AGC) of Alaska are pleased to have produced another edition of “Alaska’s Construction Spending Forecast.” Compiled and written by Scott Goldsmith and Mouhcine Guettabi of the University of Alaska’s Institute of Social and Economic Research (ISER), the “Forecast” reviews construction activity, projects and spending by both the private and public sectors for the year ahead. The construction trade is Alaska’s third largest industry, paying the second highest wages, employing nearly 16,000 workers with a payroll over $1 billion. It accounts for 20 percent of Alaska’s total economy and currently contributes approximately $8 billion to the state’s economy. The construction industry reflects the pulse of the economy. When it is vigorous, so is the state’s economy. Both CIPF and AGC are proud to make this publication available annually and hope it provides useful information for you. AGC is a non-profit, full service construction association for commercial and industrial contractors, subcontractors and associates. CIPF is organized to advance the interests of the construction industry throughout the state of Alaska through a management and labor partnership.
    • 2014 Alaska Department of Corrections Institutional Population

      University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-11-06)
      This article looks at highlights from the 2014 Alaska Offender Profile published by the Alaska Department of Corrections (DOC), with a focus on institutional populations housed both in-state and out-of-state for the period 2005–2014. Institutional populations include pretrial detainees, post-conviction inmates, and probation and/or parole violators housed in a correctional facility. A brief sidebar describes Alaska's unified system of corrections.
    • 2014 Alaska Native Studies Conference Program

      UAS Organizing Committee (2015-08-20)
    • 2014 Alaska's Construction Spending Forecast

      Goldsmith, Oliver Scott; Killorin, Mary; Leask, Linda (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2014-02)
      The Construction Industry Progress Fund (CIPF) and the Associated General Contractors (AGC) of Alaska are pleased to have produced another edition of “Alaska’s Construction Spending Forecast.” Underwritten by Northrim Bank, compiled and written by Scott Goldsmith, Mary Killorin and Linda Leask of the University of Alaska’s Institute of Social and Economic Research (ISER), the “Forecast” reviews construction activity, projects and spending by both the private and public sectors for the year ahead. The construction trade is Alaska’s third largest industry, paying the second highest wages, employing nearly 16,000 workers with a payroll over $1 billion. It accounts for 20 percent of Alaska’s total economy and currently contributes approximately $9 billion to the state’s economy. The construction industry reflects the pulse of the economy. When it is vigorous, so is the state’s economy. Both CIPF and AGC are proud to make this publication available annually and hope it provides useful information for you. AGC is a non-profit, full service construction association for commercial and industrial contractors, subcontractors and associates. CIPF is organized to advance the interests of the construction industry throughout the state of Alaska through a management and labor partnership
    • 2015 Alaska Native Studies Conference Program

      Alaska Native Studies Conference Organizing Committee (2015-03-06)
    • 2016 Alaska's Construction Spending Forecast

      Cravez, Pamela; Goldsmith, Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1/1/2016)
    • 2017 Alaska's Construction Spending Forecast

      Cravez, Pamela; Goldsmith, Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1/1/2017)