• Galena Electric Power - a Situational Analysis

      Chaney, Robert E.; Colt, Steve; Johnson, Ronald A.; Wies, Richard W.; White, Gregory J. (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2004)
      The purpose of the investigation is to compare the economics of various electrical power generation options for the City of Galena. Options were assessed over a 30-year project period, beginning in 2010, and the final results were compared on the basis of residential customer electric rates ($/kWh). Galena’s electric utility currently generates power using internal combustion diesel engines and generator sets. Nearby, there is an exposed coal seam, which might provide fuel for a power plant. Contributions to the energy mix might come from solar, municipal solid waste, or wood. The City has also been approached by Toshiba, Inc., as a demonstration site for a small (Model 4S) nuclear reactor power plant. The Yukon River is possibly a site for in-river turbines for hydroelectric power. This report summarizes the comparative economics of various energy supply options.
    • The Gas Reserves Tax Ballot Initiative: Risky State Policy

      Goldsmith, Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2006)
      Alaska voters will decide whether the state government should start taxing the natural gas reserves in the two largest North Slope gas fields. The idea behind the proposal is to jump-start construction of a gas pipeline. The North Slope has one of the largest accumulations of natural gas in the U.S., and Alaskans have been waiting a long time for a pipeline to carry that gas to market. Recent higher gas prices have made the project more attractive. Several oil companies hold leases on the gas. They’ve taken steps toward a pipeline—like negotiating fiscal terms with the state—but they haven’t committed to building one. Supporters of the reserves tax think they’re delaying the project (for various possible reasons) and should be pushed. The ballot proposal calls for the oil companies to pay a reserves tax—a tax on gas in the ground—until a pipeline is completed and North Slope gas is up for sale. It offers incentives for them to speed up the project: the sooner the pipeline is finished, the less they pay; and later they would recover some of what they did pay, in credits on gas production taxes. This report is summarized in the fifth Fiscal Policy Note which is included with this document record.
    • Gender and Violence in Spanish Culture

      Garcia, Rebeca Maseda (University of Alaska Anchorage. Bookstore, 2018-04-19)
    • General Communication, Inc. Project Management Office Reporting for Results Project

      Neill, Donna (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-12-01)
      General Communication Incorporated (GCI) is a project-driven company. As the PMO is established there is a need to document current reporting practices and improve the organizations project management maturity level by standardizing the reporting process and methodology, and determining the foundation to practice continuous improvement within the program management group. Research is needed to document an effective reporting system and implement improvements to the current reporting system with input from GCI team members. The goal of this project is to develop an effective reporting guide that documents current reporting templates and practices, and considers best practices and project management maturity for areas of improvements and more effective reporting.
    • Getting started with the ContentDM Project Client Part 1: The things you need to do ahead of time

      Schmuland, Arlene B. (2021-03-02)
      This is the first part of a five-step tutorial on setting up the software for participation in the Alaska's Digital Archives project. It describes the steps that must be completed before downloading the software. Part 2 is installing the software, Part 3 is Creating a project, Part 4 is Setting up a project, Part 5 is Adding files to a project.
    • Getting started with the ContentDM Project Client Part 2: installing the software

      Schmuland, Arlene B. (2021-03-03)
      This is the second part of a five-step tutorial on setting up the software for participation in the Alaska's Digital Archives project. It describes the steps to download and install the software. Part 1 is the steps that must be complete prior to installing the software, Part 3 is Creating a project, Part 4 is Setting up a project, Part 5 is Adding files to a project.
    • Getting started with the ContentDM Project Client part 3: Creating a project

      Schmuland, Arlene B. (2021-03-03)
      This is the third part of a five-step tutorial on setting up the software for participation in the Alaska's Digital Archives project. It describes the steps that must be completed to create a project: the function within the ContentDM software that allows you to attach metadata to files. Part 1 is the steps that must be complete prior to installing the software, Part 2 is installing the software, Part 4 is Setting up a project, Part 5 is Adding files to a project.
    • Getting started with the ContentDM Project Client Part 4: setting up your project

      Schmuland, Arlene B. (2021-03-02)
      This is the fourth part of a five-step tutorial on setting up the software for participation in the Alaska's Digital Archives project. It describes the steps that must be completed to fill in the default information that will apply to all files added to the project. Part 1 is the steps that must be complete prior to installing the software, Part 2 is installing the software, Part 3 is Creating a project, Part 5 is Adding files to a project.
    • Getting started with the ContentDM Project Client part 5: Adding files to your project

      Schmuland, Arlene B. (2021-03-02)
      This is the fifth part of a five-step tutorial on setting up the software for participation in the Alaska's Digital Archives project. It describes how to add the files (images, audio, documents, etc.,) to a project in preparation for attaching descriptive metadata to those files. Part 1 is the steps that must be complete prior to installing the software, Part 2 is installing the software, Part 3 is Creating a project, Part 4 is Setting up a project.
    • Ghana, Africa's newest star

      Lutz, Lawrence (University of Alaska Anchorage. Bookstore, 2014-04-04)
      In 2012, Time magazine called Ghana "Africa's Newest Star." It has a multi-party democracy, a growing economy that includes oil production and a glowing reputation for hospitality. Lawrence Lutz (who works with the NSB Health Department in Barrow, AK) visited Ghana with the Peace Corps in 1990. He returned in 2009 to give HIV/AIDS training to educators. At this event, Lawrence Lutz shares his knowledge about Ghana and the experiences he had living there.
    • Global and local climate change and adaptation: lessons from Paris.

      Wuerth, Soren; Littel, Jeremy (University of Alaska Anchorage. Bookstore, 2016-04-02)
      Soren Wuerth shares stories and photos from his visit to the Paris Climate Change Conference in december. The world of global politics and climate change is discussed. Soren Wuerth is a teacher, environmental activist, and writer living in Girdwood, Alaska. As a traveler on Spaceship Earth, he works to keep fellow passengers aware of systemic problems that threaten the engines of our biosphere. He maintains a blog at glacierwatch.wordpress.com. Joining Soren Wuerth is Jeremy Littel, a USGS climatologis.
    • Globalization and Aquaculture: Challenges, Opportunities, and Questions for the Smoked Seafood Industry

      Knapp, Gunnar (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2007)
      The world economy is experiencing far-reaching changes that are collectively referred to as “globalization.” Among the causes and consequences of globalization are increasingly reliance on markets; reductions in trade barriers and expansion of trade; world economic integration in markets for resources, goods, services, labor, and capital; movement of production to low-cost producers; consolidation and integration resulting in larger and more powerful firms operating in many countries; technological revolutions in communications and transportation; growing consumer incomes in developed and developing countries; and increasing consumer expectations for lower prices, convenience, variety, and quality. The world seafood industry is changing rapidly. This paper describes some of the most important changes that are happening and suggests questions people in the smoked seafood industry should be thinking about in order to respond to these changes.
    • Goals into Action: An Evaluation Report on the Third Bush Justice Conference

      Havelock, John E. (Criminal Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1977-04-23)
      This evaluation reports on the Third Bush Justice Conference, held in Kenai, Alaska on November 8–12, 1976. Prior bush justice conferences were held at Alyeska (1970) and Minto (1974). The report outlines themes addressed in all the bush justice conferences, focuses on ways in which bush justice conferences can improve the administration of justice in rural Alaska, and recommends ways in which state justice agencies and Alaska Native representatives can work together proactively to respond to specific problems identified at conferences.
    • Gold Nuggets: Denali Then and Now

      Lovegreen, Lynn; Lovegreen, Mark; Bale, Nancy (University of Alaska Anchorage. Bookstore, 2015-04-04)
      Lynn Lovegreen's Gold Rush series includes: Worth Her Weight in Gold (Juneau, 1886); Fool's Gold (Skagway, 1898), Quicksilver to Gold (Nome, 1900); Golden Days (Fairbanks, 1906); Gold Nuggets (Denali and Kantishna, 1916). Lynn Lovegreen was raised and lives in Anchorage, Alaska and has taught at the Anchorage School District. Mark Lovegreen, veteran tour driver in Denali National Park and Preserve, adds information on the natural history of the area. And Nancy Bale, board member of the Denali Citizens Council, provides perspective on the environmental movement of Denali Park.
    • Good collaborations: A case study of the Health Information Technology partnership

      DeFeo, Dayna Jean (Center for Alaska Education Policy Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-01-01)
      The Health Information Technology grant was a collaborative partnership between the Cook Inlet Tribal Council (CITC), the University of Alaska Community & Technical College (UAA CTC) and the University of Alaska Southeast (UAS) to establish the infrastructure for a distance-delivered Occupational Endorsement in Health Information Technology. This document describes a case study research project that explored the activities of the collaboration, specifically as they pertain to student services and outcomes. Student eligibility criteria included: Alaska Native, low-income, GED or high school diploma, and a 10th grade TABE test score; many of the student participants exhibited demographic characteristics that placed them at high risk for noncompletion. Ultimately, 10 of 25 (40%) completed the credential, and of these graduates, five are continuing their postsecondary studies for an associate’s or bachelor’s degree. These success rates that exceed national averages for community college students prompted the team to explore the program elements that contributed to student success. A qualitative case study collected interview data from student completers, program staff, and faculty. It also reviewed program documents, and included visits to the physical spaces where the program was delivered. Tangible or material resources that contributed to the program’s success included stipends for student tuition and fees plus hourly compensation for time spent in class; the provision of laptops; adequate technology; staff and services that supported college transitions, social and personal needs, and academic success; a face-to-face kickoff event; and a cohort model. Qualitative aspects of the program that fostered success include staff commitment and positive attitude; clear roles for partners with a distributed workload; alignment of program objectives to each of the partners’ missions; communication; and student perseverance. Program elements that need to be revised, expanded, or improved prior to a second iteration include course sequencing, recruitment, technology, class times, and additional stipends. Opportunities for additional programming include industry involvement, career exploration, options for students who “change majors” or decide that the HIT field is not a good fit for their interests, job seeking and career planning support, additional attention to college readiness and soft skills, and incorporation of Alaska Native culture. A review of program elements that worked and need improvement identified opportunities to better align theory and philosophy, and to strengthen communication between staff and faculty who have complementary responsibilities to one another and to students. These discussions are recommended in order to develop more intentional and focused recruiting, to strengthen communication, and to develop a more culturally responsive curriculum. Though the program does not yet present itself as a best practice model, the program strengths and lessons learned were used to develop considerations for other programs and partnerships wishing to develop similar delivery methods.
    • Good collaborations: A case study of the Health Information Technology partnership

      DeFeo, Dayna Jean (Center for Alaska Education Policy Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-01-01)
      The Health Information Technology grant was a collaborative partnership between the Cook Inlet Tribal Council (CITC), the University of Alaska Community & Technical College (UAA CTC) and the University of Alaska Southeast (UAS) to establish the infrastructure for a distance-delivered Occupational Endorsement in Health Information Technology. This document describes a case study research project that explored the activities of the collaboration, specifically as they pertain to student services and outcomes. Student eligibility criteria included: Alaska Native, low-income, GED or high school diploma, and a 10th grade TABE test score; many of the student participants exhibited demographic characteristics that placed them at high risk for noncompletion. Ultimately, 10 of 25 (40%) completed the credential, and of these graduates, five are continuing their postsecondary studies for an associate’s or bachelor’s degree. These success rates that exceed national averages for community college students prompted the team to explore the program elements that contributed to student success. A qualitative case study collected interview data from student completers, program staff, and faculty. It also reviewed program documents, and included visits to the physical spaces where the program was delivered. Tangible or material resources that contributed to the program’s success included stipends for student tuition and fees plus hourly compensation for time spent in class; the provision of laptops; adequate technology; staff and services that supported college transitions, social and personal needs, and academic success; a face-to-face kickoff event; and a cohort model. Qualitative aspects of the program that fostered success include staff commitment and positive attitude; clear roles for partners with a distributed workload; alignment of program objectives to each of the partners’ missions; communication; and student perseverance. Program elements that need to be revised, expanded, or improved prior to a second iteration include course sequencing, recruitment, technology, class times, and additional stipends. Opportunities for additional programming include industry involvement, career exploration, options for students who “change majors” or decide that the HIT field is not a good fit for their interests, job seeking and career planning support, additional attention to college readiness and soft skills, and incorporation of Alaska Native culture. A review of program elements that worked and need improvement identified opportunities to better align theory and philosophy, and to strengthen communication between staff and faculty who have complementary responsibilities to one another and to students. These discussions are recommended in order to develop more intentional and focused recruiting, to strengthen communication, and to develop a more culturally responsive curriculum. Though the program does not yet present itself as a best practice model, the program strengths and lessons learned were used to develop considerations for other programs and partnerships wishing to develop similar delivery methods.
    • Good collaborations: A case study of the Health Information Technology partnership

      Defeo, Dayna (Center for Alaska Education Policy Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1/1/2016)
    • Graduates of Alaska's Teacher Preparation Programs-Where Are They Now?

      Hill, Alexandra (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2007)
      This presentation includes a review of the sources of data, and presents preliminary findings on graduates of initial certification programs in Alaska. It's purpose was to collect feedback on what analyses to add, refine, and revise. Data is presented in a series of charts and graphs with interpretations. We matched teacher program graduation data with Department of Labor data on Permanent Fund Dividend applications – a proxy for Alaska residence. Most people are eligible for a PFD by the time they complete a teacher preparation program here, so we looked at graduates who completed their programs between 2001 and 2003, and PFD applications from 2003 to 2005. Only 10% did not apply for a PFD in 2003,. We expected that number to rise if teachers moved out of state. Teachers who leave Alaska schools but remain in Alaska continue to apply for the PFD; those who don’t apply have probably left the state. By 2005, 16% no longer applied for a PFD and were probably no longer in Alaska. Further information is available in a summary and full report with a similar title.
    • A Great Disobedience against the People: Japan's Siberian Intervention, 1918-1922.

      Dunscomb, Paul E. (University of Alaska Anchorage. Bookstore, 2011-04-04)
      Paul Dunscomb is Associate Professor of East Asian History at the University of Alaska Anchorage and Director of UAA's Confucius Institute. He specializes in the domestic political aspects of Japan's Siberian Intervention, 1918-1922, Japanese popular culture, and the Lost Decade, 1992-2003. His work has appeared in the Journal of Japanese studies, East-West Connections, and Education About Asia. His just released book is called Japan's Siberian Intervention, 1918-1922: A Great Disobedience Against the People.
    • The Great Salmon Run: Competition Between Wild and Farmed Salmon

      Knapp, Gunnar; Roheim, Cathy; Anderson, James (TRAFFIC North America, 2007)
      This report examines economic and policy issues related to wild and farmed salmon in North America. These issues have received a great deal of attention in recent years, reflecting the environmental, economic and cultural importance of salmon to Americans—and the fact that salmon issues span many important policy debates ranging from environmental protection to trade policy. The salmon industry has experienced dramatic change over the past two decades. Two major trends gave rise to many of the issues discussed in this report. The first trend is the rapid and sustained growth in world farmed salmon and salmon trout production, from two percent of world supply in 1980 to 65 percent of world supply in 2004. The growth of farmed salmon and the decline in the value of wild salmon has given rise to two broad sets of questions: • How has salmon farming affected wild salmon resources and the wild salmon industry? • What should be done to protect wild salmon resources and strengthen the wild salmon industry?"