• Parole and Probation in Alaska, 2002–2016

      Reamey, Random (Alaska Justice Information Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-06-05)
      This fact sheet presents data on the characteristics of offenders who came under the supervision of the Alaska Department of Corrections, Division of Probation and Parole (DOC-PP) between 2002 and 2016. Probation and parole offender data are from the Alaska Department of Corrections’ annual Offender Profile publication. Overall trends saw numbers of probationers and parolees increasing from 2002 to 2012, then decreasing through 2016. The majority of probationers and parolees are between 20 and 34 years old. The trend for both males and females followed the overall trend, increasing from 2002 to 2012 then decreasing. On average, from 2002 to 2016, Alaska Natives were 26.7% of the probation and parole population, Asian & or Pacific Islander 4.1%, Black 8.7%, and White 56.1%.
    • Passport series

      Jeon, Jin Yeong; McTier, Jackson; Medvedko, Anastasia (University of Alaska Anchorage. Bookstore, 2015-04-13)
      The Passport series idea is to hear about students' life before coming to UAA and the challenges you face living in Anchorage and going to school at UAA. This episode features: Jin Yeong Jeon from South Korea, Jackson McTier from Australia, and Anastasia Medvedko from Russia.
    • Passport series: China and Brazil

      Wang, Yuqing; Na, Xinlei; Rodrigues, Ana Spaic (University of Alaska Anchorage. Bookstore, 2015-04-20)
      Come and hear about international studetns' lives before coming to UAA and the challenges they face living in Anchorage and going to school at UAA. China and Brazil with Yuqing Wang, Xinlei Na, and Ana Spaic Rodrigues.
    • Passport Series: South Korea, Hungary, Gambia

      Choi, Kyung Yeun; Berecz, Anna; Forster, Doreen (University of Alaska Anchorage. Bookstore, 2015-04-16)
      Come and hear about international students' life before coming to UAA and the challenges they face living in Anchorage and going to school at UAA. Kyung Yeun Choi, South Korea; Anna Berecz, Hungary, Doreen Forster, Gambia.
    • The Past and Future of LNG in Alaska

      Tussing, Arlon R. (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2005)
      Why do negotiations between the State and the North Slope gas producers ignore LNG [liquefied natural gas] export proposals, including that of the Alaska Gasline Port Authority [AGPA]? The three main North Slope gas producers [ConocoPhillips, BP and ExxonMobil], and Alaska’s Murkowski Administration, agree that an overland pipeline from Prudhoe Bay, crossing Canada to the U.S. Midwest, is the most promising transport system under present and foreseeable conditions, for marketing Arctic gas. Nevertheless, plans to ship LNG in “cryogenic” [low-pressure refrigerated] tankers from a Southcentral Alaska port such as Valdez or Kenai, to the Lower 48 or East Asia remain technically plausible marketing alternatives to a transcontinental gas pipeline. Currently, the most prominent proposal for such an alternative is sponsored by the Alaska Gasline Port Authority [AGPA], a coalition of three municipalities—the North Slope and Fairbanks North Star Boroughs, and the City of Valdez—which are located North to South along the route of the TransAlaska oil pipeline from the Arctic Ocean to Prince William Sound.
    • The Path to a Fiscal Solution: Use Earnings from All Our Assets

      Goldsmith, Oliver Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-04-23)
      Thanks to a combination of good decisions and a little luck, today Governor Hammond’s vision has become a reality. More than $60 billion in financial accounts now generates more income for the state government than petroleum production. Yet we continue to rely mostly on current petroleum revenues to pay for public services—and as oil production declines, “sliding down the falling Prudhoe Bay revenue curve” is proving to be a formula for fiscal and economic disaster. In fiscal year 2016, General Fund revenues are expected to be only about $2.2 billion. That will leave an apparent “deficit” of about $3.3 billion, based on spending of $5.5 billion. But the state doesn’t have to face such a huge shortfall. There is a straightforward solution that Jay Hammond foresaw: using both current revenues and earnings from the state’s portfolio of assets (financial accounts and future petroleum revenues) to pay for public services.
    • Pathways to College Preparatory Advanced Academic Offerings in the Anchorage School District

      Hirshberg, Diane; Frazier, Rosyland (Center for Alaska Education Policy Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-10-14)
      There are many ways a child in the Anchorage School District (ASD) can access advanced course offerings. To a parent these pathways may seem complex. ASD offers options for gifted and highly gifted students at the elementary and middle school level, and accelerated, and enriched learning opportunities such as honors and advanced placement courses at the secondary level. These opportunities, though linked, are not the same, nor do they necessarily follow from one to another in a straight path. Moreover, pathways to and through these opportunities can be quite different. Offerings are different at the elementary, middle and high school levels, with differing qualifications and eligibility. And, some of the programs are only offered in a few particular schools. This variety provides lots of flexibility. It also creates a complex path of choices and decisions. In all of these pathways and choices, active advocacy by a parent is necessary to ensure that their child receive the best and most appropriate opportunities. In this report we describe the many advanced and accelerated learning opportunities available in Anchorage elementary, middle and high schools, and the ways students can access these opportunities. We provide visuals including figures, tables and text to highlight the pathways to and through advanced offerings from Kindergarten to 12th grade. This document is based upon publicly available information. We have combined information from the ASD gifted program website the ASD High School Handbook, the ASD High School Program of Studies guide, and minutes of the ASD Board meetings. We also spoke with staff in the gifted program at ASD. Individual school-level issues that are outside of ASD policy and procedures have not been included. This report focused on the services, programs and schools within the Anchorage School District that service as pathways to college preparation and advance academic course offerings. As we describe in more detail in this report, there are very different offerings and paths at the elementary, middle and high school. In general, there are gifted and highly gifted programs at the elementary and middle school level, and a highly gifted program at the high school level. At all school levels, the highly gifted programs are offered at a limited number of schools. In high school, all students (including those in the highly gifted program) have the opportunity to take honors and advanced placement classes. Math is not included in the middle and high school gifted program. Math instead is a curriculum progression. Advanced math opportunities usually start in 6th grade, when students can choose placement into math courses that are a higher than the usual level. Opting for advanced math in 6th grade puts a student on track to reach Algebra I in 8th grade and calculus in 12th. At the elementary school level ASD operates gifted programs in all schools and a highly gifted program in one. There are also alternative and optional schools, which offer accelerated and enriched learning environments. If a student is in the highly gifted or gifted program in elementary school, he or she usually transitions to gifted and highly gifted middle school programs. In middle school these programs 3 include gifted language arts and science classes. Students who were not a part of the gifted program in elementary school can access the middle school gifted program, by testing in. Many optional and alternative programs provide enriched and accelerated classes to all students in them. For high school students there is a greater variety of advanced offerings. Starting in 9th grade there are honors and Advanced Placement (AP) courses, Credit-by-Choice options, and optional programs within the high schools and alternative schools. Students in the middle school gifted and highly gifted program have the opportunity to transition into the high school Highly Gifted Program.
    • Pathways to College Preparatory Advanced Academic Offerings in the Anchorage School District

      Frazier, Rosyland (Center for Alaska Education Policy Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-10-01)
      There are many ways a child in the Anchorage School District (ASD) can access advanced course offerings. To a parent these pathways may seem complex. ASD offers options for gifted and highly gifted students at the elementary and middle school level, and accelerated, and enriched learning opportunities such as honors and advanced placement courses at the secondary level. These opportunities, though linked, are not the same, nor do they necessarily follow from one to another in a straight path. Moreover, pathways to and through these opportunities can be quite different. Offerings are different at the elementary, middle and high school levels, with differing qualifications and eligibility. And, some of the programs are only offered in a few particular schools. This variety provides lots of flexibility. It also creates a complex path of choices and decisions. In all of these pathways and choices, active advocacy by a parent is necessary to ensure that their child receive the best and most appropriate opportunities. In this report we describe the many advanced and accelerated learning opportunities available in Anchorage elementary, middle and high schools, and the ways students can access these opportunities. We provide visuals including figures, tables and text to highlight the pathways to and through advanced offerings from Kindergarten to 12th grade. This document is based upon publicly available information. We have combined information from the ASD gifted program website the ASD High School Handbook, the ASD High School Program of Studies guide, and minutes of the ASD Board meetings. We also spoke with staff in the gifted program at ASD. Individual school-level issues that are outside of ASD policy and procedures have not been included. This report focused on the services, programs and schools within the Anchorage School District that service as pathways to college preparation and advance academic course offerings. As we describe in more detail in this report, there are very different offerings and paths at the elementary, middle and high school. In general, there are gifted and highly gifted programs at the elementary and middle school level, and a highly gifted program at the high school level. At all school levels, the highly gifted programs are offered at a limited number of schools. In high school, all students (including those in the highly gifted program) have the opportunity to take honors and advanced placement classes. Math is not included in the middle and high school gifted program. Math instead is a curriculum progression. Advanced math opportunities usually start in 6th grade, when students can choose placement into math courses that are a higher than the usual level. Opting for advanced math in 6th grade puts a student on track to reach Algebra I in 8th grade and calculus in 12th. At the elementary school level ASD operates gifted programs in all schools and a highly gifted program in one. There are also alternative and optional schools, which offer accelerated and enriched learning environments. If a student is in the highly gifted or gifted program in elementary school, he or she usually transitions to gifted and highly gifted middle school programs. In middle school these programs 3 include gifted language arts and science classes. Students who were not a part of the gifted program in elementary school can access the middle school gifted program, by testing in. Many optional and alternative programs provide enriched and accelerated classes to all students in them. For high school students there is a greater variety of advanced offerings. Starting in 9th grade there are honors and Advanced Placement (AP) courses, Credit-by-Choice options, and optional programs within the high schools and alternative schools. Students in the middle school gifted and highly gifted program have the opportunity to transition into the high school Highly Gifted Program. The following table provides a look at advanced offerings at different school levels. Each of these offerings is discussed in the report.
    • Pediatric Lead Screening in the United States: A Comparative Analysis

      Sykes, Genevieve (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-01-05)
      The purpose of this project is identification of approaches to pediatric lead screening in the United States by each of the fifty states and evaluation of whether best practice is being utilized. Data was obtained from publicly available state based websites and interaction with state departments; there were no participants in this project. The data was compared and contrasted among each of the fifty states and against current screening recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC]. Only one state, Delaware, has screening recommendations current with CDC standards. There is a large amount of variation between how state approaches pediatric lead screening. Several recommendations were proposed for the improvement of pediatric lead screening in the United States, including the following; all test results be reported in every state, states should assess need for screening universally versus screening Medicaid-eligible children only, states update their geographic risk areas yearly, screening recommendations be made available in a single area, and all questionnaire include questions about symptoms, lead sources, hand washing, and children with risk.
    • The Perceptions of Parents of Adolescents Who Have Experienced Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) Occurrences: Support and Parental Role

      Costello, Florence (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-04-01)
      This descriptive qualitative scholarly project explored the perceptions of parents of adolescents who have experienced non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI). Eight interviews were conducted and transcriptions were produced from digital recordings. A software program was used to organize, analyze, and produce findings from the transcribed interviews. Major themes were feelings of shock and helplessness and thoughts of wanting to know. Sub-themes for shock and helplessness were feelings of guilt, feeling of disbelief, feeling anxious, and feeling frightened. Sub-themes for thoughts of wanting to know about were awareness, parental involvement and available support.
    • Perceptions of UAA Culinary Medicine Curriculum by Dietetics Students

      Hillen, Allison Michelle (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2020-05-01)
      Participation in culinary medicine courses has resulted in significant health benefits to both medical personnel and students taking part in these courses, as well as the patients they subsequently treat. As culinary medicine curriculums are implemented across the country, evaluating outcomes becomes necessary. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate and identify which components of the University of Alaska Anchorage culinary medicine curriculum were most and least beneficial in supporting the achievement of course student learning outcomes (SLOs) and a resulting sense of competency in culinary medicine among students. Determining qualitative outcomes of education and comparing these with expected SLOs helps to further develop the culinary medicine curriculum. Adding to the established literature strengthens the basis for culinary medicine’s expansion. Outcomes indicate that the courses’ major project, the Community Culinary Nutrition Intervention (CCNI), had the greatest impact on the student learning experience. Students’ culinary skills were strengthened as was their creativity. Students experienced what they referred to as an “eye-opening” look at their communities, seeing them in a new light after completing the CCNI. A small study size as well as limited diversity in demographics limit the generalizability of this study. The findings of this study help to inform faculty with making modifications to the existing course framework.
    • Perceptions of Universal Ballet Delivery Systems

      Hanna, Virgene; Passini, Jessica (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-06-22)
      A total of 412 registered voters in the Bethel, Dillingham, and Kusilvak Census Areas completed surveys with ISER interviewers in March and April of 2018. The majority (74%) of respondents reported their race as Alaska Native and 13% were White. Near the beginning of the survey, interviewers asked respondents how they preferred to receive their ballot and 60% said they preferred to get it in person on Election Day, 21% would prefer to receive it by mail, and 17% would prefer to receive their ballot online. After respondents heard a description of three voting methods being considered: 1) keep voting the way it is now; 2) mail out and mail back; and 3) receive ballot in the mail and have different ways to return it their preferences changed somewhat. Of the three methods, keep voting the way it is now was the first choice by 49% of respondents, followed by 36% for option 3, and 14% for option 2. Respondents had little experience with voting methods other than in-person. When asked what made it difficult for them and other members of their community to vote, personal reasons, such as being sick or out of town, was the most frequent (37%) response. About two-thirds (64%) reported personal reasons made it difficult for people in their community to vote followed by 46% saying that the ballot being written in English made it difficult for people in their community. Over half (56%) of respondents reported they are satisfied with their mail service, only 17% of those who were satisfied said they would prefer to receive or return their ballot by mail.
    • Perceptions of Universal Ballot Delivery Systems

      Hanna, Virgene; Passini, Jessica (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 6/22/2018)
      A total of 412 registered voters in the Bethel, Dillingham, and Kusilvak Census Areas completed surveys with ISER interviewers in March and April of 2018. The majority (74%) of respondents reported their race as Alaska Native and 13% were White. Near the beginning of the survey, interviewers asked respondents how they preferred to receive their ballot and 60% said they preferred to get it in person on Election Day, 21% would prefer to receive it by mail, and 17% would prefer to receive their ballot online. After respondents heard a description of three voting methods being considered: 1) keep voting the way it is now; 2) mail out and mail back; and 3) receive ballot in the mail and have different ways to return it their preferences changed somewhat. Of the three methods, keep voting the way it is now was the first choice by 49% of respondents, followed by 36% for option 3, and 14% for option 2. Respondents had little experience with voting methods other than in-person. When asked what made it difficult for them and other members of their community to vote, personal reasons, such as being sick or out of town, was the most frequent (37%) response. About two-thirds (64%) reported personal reasons made it difficult for people in their community to vote followed by 46% saying that the ballot being written in English made it difficult for people in their community. Over half (56%) of respondents reported they are satisfied with their mail service, only 17% of those who were satisfied said they would prefer to receive or return their ballot by mail.
    • Peregrine

      Goodwin, Caroline (University of Alaska Anchorage. Bookstore, 2015-12-14)
      Born and raised in Anchorage, Alaska, Caroline Goodwin received her MFA in Poetry from the University of British Columbia and was awarded the Wallace Stegner fellowship in poetry at Stanford University in 1999. Today, while fulfilling her role as the first appointed Poet Laureate in San Mateo County, California, Caroline teaches in the MFA Writing and the undergraduate Writing and Literature programs at California College of the Arts in Oakland, California, and also at the Stanford Writer's Studio. Her first collection of poetry, Trapline, was published in 2013. In a review of Peregrine, poet Louise Mathias writes: "Both a charm against, and a love song to the fleeting, Goodwin masterfully weaves together disparate sources--Metallica and magic, ravines and wildflowers, this work is lovely and terrifying, singular, and true."
    • Permanent Fund Dividends and Poverty in Alaska

      Berman, Matthew; Reamey, Random (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-10-18)
    • Personal Transportation in Rural Alaska

      Schwörer, Tobias (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2013-05-01)
    • Petroleum and the Alaska Economy

      Goldsmith, Oliver Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2011-06)
    • Petroleum in Alaska's Future: Why Should Rural Alaska Care?

      Goldsmith, Oliver Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2012-02-16)
    • Petroleum: Jobs and Revenues

      Goldsmith, Oliver Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2013-02-25)
    • Physical Assessment of Children With FASD: Evidence Based Practice

      Waller, Tabitha (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-12-01)
      Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) is the leading preventable cause of developmental delay worldwide. Early diagnosis and intervention are vital to the prevention of secondary disabilities for those with FASD. Current diagnostic guidelines fail to identify the many physical malformations associated with prenatal alcohol exposure and recommendations for diagnostic differentials vary between guidelines. A critical appraisal of the literature and review of current guidelines was conducted to create an evidence-based physical anomaly checklist and differential diagnostic table. The critical appraisal consisted of 27 articles and resulted in 85 physical anomalies associated with prenatal alcohol exposure. The review of current guidelines resulted in five guidelines and four supportive articles that identified 20 different genetic disorder differentials and four exposure related differentials. A Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA) quality improvement model was used to implement education on the reference tools and encourage practice implementation in a North American FASD diagnostic team. All providers directly participating in the diagnosis of FASDs must be aware of the many physical anomalies associated with prenatal alcohol exposure and should have a working knowledge of potential differential diagnoses. The physical anomaly checklist and differential diagnoses tables help to provide this information in a clinically practical way.