• Parole and Probation in Alaska, 2002–2016

      Reamey, Random (Alaska Justice Information Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-06-05)
      This fact sheet presents data on the characteristics of offenders who came under the supervision of the Alaska Department of Corrections, Division of Probation and Parole (DOC-PP) between 2002 and 2016. Probation and parole offender data are from the Alaska Department of Corrections’ annual Offender Profile publication. Overall trends saw numbers of probationers and parolees increasing from 2002 to 2012, then decreasing through 2016. The majority of probationers and parolees are between 20 and 34 years old. The trend for both males and females followed the overall trend, increasing from 2002 to 2012 then decreasing. On average, from 2002 to 2016, Alaska Natives were 26.7% of the probation and parole population, Asian & or Pacific Islander 4.1%, Black 8.7%, and White 56.1%.
    • The Path to a Fiscal Solution: Use Earnings from All Our Assets

      Goldsmith, Oliver Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-04-23)
      Thanks to a combination of good decisions and a little luck, today Governor Hammond’s vision has become a reality. More than $60 billion in financial accounts now generates more income for the state government than petroleum production. Yet we continue to rely mostly on current petroleum revenues to pay for public services—and as oil production declines, “sliding down the falling Prudhoe Bay revenue curve” is proving to be a formula for fiscal and economic disaster. In fiscal year 2016, General Fund revenues are expected to be only about $2.2 billion. That will leave an apparent “deficit” of about $3.3 billion, based on spending of $5.5 billion. But the state doesn’t have to face such a huge shortfall. There is a straightforward solution that Jay Hammond foresaw: using both current revenues and earnings from the state’s portfolio of assets (financial accounts and future petroleum revenues) to pay for public services.
    • Pathways to College Preparatory Advanced Academic Offerings in the Anchorage School District

      Hirshberg, Diane; Frazier, Rosyland (Center for Alaska Education Policy Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-10-14)
      There are many ways a child in the Anchorage School District (ASD) can access advanced course offerings. To a parent these pathways may seem complex. ASD offers options for gifted and highly gifted students at the elementary and middle school level, and accelerated, and enriched learning opportunities such as honors and advanced placement courses at the secondary level. These opportunities, though linked, are not the same, nor do they necessarily follow from one to another in a straight path. Moreover, pathways to and through these opportunities can be quite different. Offerings are different at the elementary, middle and high school levels, with differing qualifications and eligibility. And, some of the programs are only offered in a few particular schools. This variety provides lots of flexibility. It also creates a complex path of choices and decisions. In all of these pathways and choices, active advocacy by a parent is necessary to ensure that their child receive the best and most appropriate opportunities. In this report we describe the many advanced and accelerated learning opportunities available in Anchorage elementary, middle and high schools, and the ways students can access these opportunities. We provide visuals including figures, tables and text to highlight the pathways to and through advanced offerings from Kindergarten to 12th grade. This document is based upon publicly available information. We have combined information from the ASD gifted program website the ASD High School Handbook, the ASD High School Program of Studies guide, and minutes of the ASD Board meetings. We also spoke with staff in the gifted program at ASD. Individual school-level issues that are outside of ASD policy and procedures have not been included. This report focused on the services, programs and schools within the Anchorage School District that service as pathways to college preparation and advance academic course offerings. As we describe in more detail in this report, there are very different offerings and paths at the elementary, middle and high school. In general, there are gifted and highly gifted programs at the elementary and middle school level, and a highly gifted program at the high school level. At all school levels, the highly gifted programs are offered at a limited number of schools. In high school, all students (including those in the highly gifted program) have the opportunity to take honors and advanced placement classes. Math is not included in the middle and high school gifted program. Math instead is a curriculum progression. Advanced math opportunities usually start in 6th grade, when students can choose placement into math courses that are a higher than the usual level. Opting for advanced math in 6th grade puts a student on track to reach Algebra I in 8th grade and calculus in 12th. At the elementary school level ASD operates gifted programs in all schools and a highly gifted program in one. There are also alternative and optional schools, which offer accelerated and enriched learning environments. If a student is in the highly gifted or gifted program in elementary school, he or she usually transitions to gifted and highly gifted middle school programs. In middle school these programs 3 include gifted language arts and science classes. Students who were not a part of the gifted program in elementary school can access the middle school gifted program, by testing in. Many optional and alternative programs provide enriched and accelerated classes to all students in them. For high school students there is a greater variety of advanced offerings. Starting in 9th grade there are honors and Advanced Placement (AP) courses, Credit-by-Choice options, and optional programs within the high schools and alternative schools. Students in the middle school gifted and highly gifted program have the opportunity to transition into the high school Highly Gifted Program.
    • Pathways to College Preparatory Advanced Academic Offerings in the Anchorage School District

      Frazier, Rosyland (Center for Alaska Education Policy Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-10-01)
      There are many ways a child in the Anchorage School District (ASD) can access advanced course offerings. To a parent these pathways may seem complex. ASD offers options for gifted and highly gifted students at the elementary and middle school level, and accelerated, and enriched learning opportunities such as honors and advanced placement courses at the secondary level. These opportunities, though linked, are not the same, nor do they necessarily follow from one to another in a straight path. Moreover, pathways to and through these opportunities can be quite different. Offerings are different at the elementary, middle and high school levels, with differing qualifications and eligibility. And, some of the programs are only offered in a few particular schools. This variety provides lots of flexibility. It also creates a complex path of choices and decisions. In all of these pathways and choices, active advocacy by a parent is necessary to ensure that their child receive the best and most appropriate opportunities. In this report we describe the many advanced and accelerated learning opportunities available in Anchorage elementary, middle and high schools, and the ways students can access these opportunities. We provide visuals including figures, tables and text to highlight the pathways to and through advanced offerings from Kindergarten to 12th grade. This document is based upon publicly available information. We have combined information from the ASD gifted program website the ASD High School Handbook, the ASD High School Program of Studies guide, and minutes of the ASD Board meetings. We also spoke with staff in the gifted program at ASD. Individual school-level issues that are outside of ASD policy and procedures have not been included. This report focused on the services, programs and schools within the Anchorage School District that service as pathways to college preparation and advance academic course offerings. As we describe in more detail in this report, there are very different offerings and paths at the elementary, middle and high school. In general, there are gifted and highly gifted programs at the elementary and middle school level, and a highly gifted program at the high school level. At all school levels, the highly gifted programs are offered at a limited number of schools. In high school, all students (including those in the highly gifted program) have the opportunity to take honors and advanced placement classes. Math is not included in the middle and high school gifted program. Math instead is a curriculum progression. Advanced math opportunities usually start in 6th grade, when students can choose placement into math courses that are a higher than the usual level. Opting for advanced math in 6th grade puts a student on track to reach Algebra I in 8th grade and calculus in 12th. At the elementary school level ASD operates gifted programs in all schools and a highly gifted program in one. There are also alternative and optional schools, which offer accelerated and enriched learning environments. If a student is in the highly gifted or gifted program in elementary school, he or she usually transitions to gifted and highly gifted middle school programs. In middle school these programs 3 include gifted language arts and science classes. Students who were not a part of the gifted program in elementary school can access the middle school gifted program, by testing in. Many optional and alternative programs provide enriched and accelerated classes to all students in them. For high school students there is a greater variety of advanced offerings. Starting in 9th grade there are honors and Advanced Placement (AP) courses, Credit-by-Choice options, and optional programs within the high schools and alternative schools. Students in the middle school gifted and highly gifted program have the opportunity to transition into the high school Highly Gifted Program. The following table provides a look at advanced offerings at different school levels. Each of these offerings is discussed in the report.
    • Pediatric Lead Screening in the United States: A Comparative Analysis

      Sykes, Genevieve (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-01-05)
      The purpose of this project is identification of approaches to pediatric lead screening in the United States by each of the fifty states and evaluation of whether best practice is being utilized. Data was obtained from publicly available state based websites and interaction with state departments; there were no participants in this project. The data was compared and contrasted among each of the fifty states and against current screening recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC]. Only one state, Delaware, has screening recommendations current with CDC standards. There is a large amount of variation between how state approaches pediatric lead screening. Several recommendations were proposed for the improvement of pediatric lead screening in the United States, including the following; all test results be reported in every state, states should assess need for screening universally versus screening Medicaid-eligible children only, states update their geographic risk areas yearly, screening recommendations be made available in a single area, and all questionnaire include questions about symptoms, lead sources, hand washing, and children with risk.
    • The Perceptions of Parents of Adolescents Who Have Experienced Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) Occurrences: Support and Parental Role

      Costello, Florence (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-04-01)
      This descriptive qualitative scholarly project explored the perceptions of parents of adolescents who have experienced non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI). Eight interviews were conducted and transcriptions were produced from digital recordings. A software program was used to organize, analyze, and produce findings from the transcribed interviews. Major themes were feelings of shock and helplessness and thoughts of wanting to know. Sub-themes for shock and helplessness were feelings of guilt, feeling of disbelief, feeling anxious, and feeling frightened. Sub-themes for thoughts of wanting to know about were awareness, parental involvement and available support.
    • Perceptions of Universal Ballet Delivery Systems

      Hanna, Virgene; Passini, Jessica (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-06-22)
      A total of 412 registered voters in the Bethel, Dillingham, and Kusilvak Census Areas completed surveys with ISER interviewers in March and April of 2018. The majority (74%) of respondents reported their race as Alaska Native and 13% were White. Near the beginning of the survey, interviewers asked respondents how they preferred to receive their ballot and 60% said they preferred to get it in person on Election Day, 21% would prefer to receive it by mail, and 17% would prefer to receive their ballot online. After respondents heard a description of three voting methods being considered: 1) keep voting the way it is now; 2) mail out and mail back; and 3) receive ballot in the mail and have different ways to return it their preferences changed somewhat. Of the three methods, keep voting the way it is now was the first choice by 49% of respondents, followed by 36% for option 3, and 14% for option 2. Respondents had little experience with voting methods other than in-person. When asked what made it difficult for them and other members of their community to vote, personal reasons, such as being sick or out of town, was the most frequent (37%) response. About two-thirds (64%) reported personal reasons made it difficult for people in their community to vote followed by 46% saying that the ballot being written in English made it difficult for people in their community. Over half (56%) of respondents reported they are satisfied with their mail service, only 17% of those who were satisfied said they would prefer to receive or return their ballot by mail.
    • Permanent Fund Dividends and Poverty in Alaska

      Berman, Matthew; Reamey, Random (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-10-18)
    • Personal Transportation in Rural Alaska

      Schwörer, Tobias (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2013-05-01)
    • Petroleum and the Alaska Economy

      Goldsmith, Oliver Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2011-06)
    • Petroleum in Alaska's Future: Why Should Rural Alaska Care?

      Goldsmith, Oliver Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2012-02-16)
    • Petroleum: Jobs and Revenues

      Goldsmith, Oliver Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2013-02-25)
    • Physical Assessment of Children With FASD: Evidence Based Practice

      Waller, Tabitha (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-12-01)
      Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) is the leading preventable cause of developmental delay worldwide. Early diagnosis and intervention are vital to the prevention of secondary disabilities for those with FASD. Current diagnostic guidelines fail to identify the many physical malformations associated with prenatal alcohol exposure and recommendations for diagnostic differentials vary between guidelines. A critical appraisal of the literature and review of current guidelines was conducted to create an evidence-based physical anomaly checklist and differential diagnostic table. The critical appraisal consisted of 27 articles and resulted in 85 physical anomalies associated with prenatal alcohol exposure. The review of current guidelines resulted in five guidelines and four supportive articles that identified 20 different genetic disorder differentials and four exposure related differentials. A Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA) quality improvement model was used to implement education on the reference tools and encourage practice implementation in a North American FASD diagnostic team. All providers directly participating in the diagnosis of FASDs must be aware of the many physical anomalies associated with prenatal alcohol exposure and should have a working knowledge of potential differential diagnoses. The physical anomaly checklist and differential diagnoses tables help to provide this information in a clinically practical way.
    • Pilot Project: A Script About Health and the People of Juneau, Alaska

      Henderson, Audra (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-05-01)
      This paper contains a comprehensive report for the Masters of Public Health Project Practicum, Pilot Project: A Script about Health and the People of Juneau, Alaska. The goal of the project was to use health theory, health research methods, and television writing elements to explore how people living in Juneau, Alaska practice healthy behaviors. The aim of this project was to create a sample script of the first episode and a brief synopsis (i.e., treatment) of a show entitled Health Around the World. Using qualitative research methods of purposive sampling and key informant interviews, the expected outcomes were increased knowledge of the health behaviors of people living in Juneau, Alaska. Findings suggest that outdoor activity, a sense of community, access to nature and natural beauty are the top reasons why people live in Juneau; and involving one’s self within the community and taking advantage of the natural resources, such as engaging in outdoor activity, are factors directly related to the health and wellbeing of Juneau residents. The completed script and treatment will be sent to television networks and producers until purchase.
    • PMIAK Chapter Volunteer Handbook

      Baatarbileg, Badam (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-12-01)
      Volunteers are the foundation and strength of Project Management Institute Alaska Chapter (PMIAK). To ensure continued growth and future success of the Chapter, proper guidance needed to be developed to recruit, retain, and recognize Chapter volunteers. Volunteering provides chapter members with an opportunity to influence and promote the project management profession, and to contribute to development of the Chapter. The purpose of this project was to create a PMIAK Chapter Volunteer Handbook with efficient processes to assist leadership engaging with volunteers. The Volunteer Handbook provides Chapter leadership with information related to recruitment, retention and recognition with step-by-step guidance for using a Volunteer Relationship Management System (VRMS). Research for development of the handbook included a literature review, best practices of Volunteer Handbooks from other Chapters, and surveys and interviews with PMIAK Chapter leadership and active volunteers.
    • Police Alcohol-Related Services Study (PASS), Phase II: A Description of the Beliefs, Perceptions and Attitudes of Anchorage Police Department Employees

      Myrstol, Brad A.; Langworthy, Robert H. (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2005-05-01)
      The principal aim of the Police Alcohol-related Services Study (PASS) was to expand knowledge about the fiscal, organizational, and cultural impact of citizen alcohol use on the Anchorage Police Department (APD). Phase II of the study employed a voluntary, self-administered questionnaire provided to all members of the APD regardless of rank, sworn status, or operational division. The questionnaire was designed to explore respondents' perceptions of their alcohol-related workload; perceptions of community problems; perceived links between alcohol use and selected social problems; attitudes, perceptions, and beliefs about the policing of alcohol-related incidents and the people involved with them; and personal and vicarious experience with alcohol-related incidents. The report describes survey response through comparison of APD employee responses across divisions within the department: operations vs. administration, patrol vs. non-patrol, and sworn vs. non-sworn.
    • The Police Alcohol-Related Services Study (PASS): A Study of the Intersection of Public Alcohol Use and Routine Police Patrol

      Myrstol, Brad A.; Langworthy, Robert H. (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2004-06-01)
      The principal aim of the Police Alcohol-related Services Study (PASS) was to expand knowledge about the fiscal, organizational, and cultural impact of citizen alcohol use on the Anchorage Police Department (APD). This report presents results from Phase I of the study, which examines the impact of citizen alcohol use as it relates directly to police patrol with a primary focus on issues of time-task allocations among Anchorage patrol officers. Data was collected through direct field observations of routine patrol operations of Anchorage police officers by professionally trained and certified interviewers.
    • Police Organization and Community Relations

      Angell, John E. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1980-10-22)
      Police scholars approached the decade of the 1970s with optimistic expectations that the use of alternative organizational designs could improve the responsiveness and effectiveness of American policing. These expectations were not fulfilled. The 1970s ended with the traditional bureaucratic philosophy more firmly entrenched in the police managerial psyche than it was in the 1960s. The author argues that this is not because the traditional bureaucratic arrangements are superior, and proposes specific changes to police organization to improve community relations and the effectiveness of the police function.
    • Police: An Agenda for the 80's

      Angell, John E. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1980-03)
      Arguing that the police field suffers from excessively narrow frames of reference and perspectives, this paper asserts that a top priority for the 1980s police agenda must be on establishing a broader perspective for the development of theory and study of policing and explores the implications of those values and trends which the author contends will shape policing for the remainder of the 20th century, identified as (1) demographic changes, (2) the diminishing quantity of fossil fuels, (3) the accelerating rate of monetary inflation, (4) rapid developments in technology (5) changing attitudes toward the acceptance of a conflict model for achieving social change objectives, (6) continuing democratization and equalization of human society and its institutions, (7) increased danger and damaging consequences from natural and manmade disasters, and (8) need for higher levels of knowledge and skill for performing future police responsibilities.
    • Policies and Procedures for Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act Compliance Monitoring

      Parry, David L. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1990-11)
      Pursuant to Section 223(1)(15) of the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act (JJDPA) of 1974 and 28 CFR Part 31.303(f), states are required to describe their plans and procedures for annually monitoring compliance with JJDPA. This document presents Alaska's monitoring procedures developed by the Justice Center of the University of Alaska Anchorage under contract with the Alaska Division of Family and Youth Services (DFYS).