• Race and Record: A Study of Juvenile Referrals in Alaska

      Schafer, N. E. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1997-09)
      The disproportionate representation of minorities in the justice system of the U.S. has been viewed with growing alarm by both researchers and policymakers. Studies of the problem tend to focus on African Americans and on the end points of the process — sentencing disparities and, especially, sentences to death at the adult level and on court outcomes and detention decisions at the juvenile level. The research presented here explores the relationship between race and prior record using juvenile referral data from Alaska. White, Alaska Native, and African American youth are compared using four years of statewide data. The research includes an in-depth examination of the files of a sample of the juveniles referred to the Alaska juvenile justice system in order to better assess the relationship between race and record.
    • Racial and Ethnic Diversity in Anchorage

      Goldsmith, Scott; Frazier, Rosyland (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2001)
      In the spring of 2001, the Mayor of Anchorage, George Wuerch, tasked a Kitchen Cabinet Task Force with the goal of developing recommendations to help heal racism in Anchorage. The Institute of Social and Economic Research (ISER) of the University of Alaska Anchorage agreed to assist the Task Force by conducting a series of focus groups in the community. The purpose of these focus groups was to obtain an assessment of attitudes and opinions about the quality of life in Anchorage from the perspective different racial groups and to solicit recommendations for improving race relations within the community....A more detailed analysis of the focus groups, based on a review of the focus group transcripts, would add more depth and detail, but we feel the main ideas identified during the focus groups are described in this report.
    • Reading and Writing with UAA Undergraduate English Students

      University of Alaska Anchorage. Bookstore, 2015-04-15
      Undergraduate creative writing students in the English Department come together to present their current work.
    • Readings and Craft Talk

      Gregovich, Andrea (University of Alaska Anchorage. Bookstore, 2015-04-28)
      Andrea Gregovich earned a MFA in Creative Writing from the University of Nevada Las Vegas and has been honing her skills as a translator of Russian literature with a focus on the work of Vladimir Kozlov. Author Vladimir Kozlov was born in 1972 in Belarus. His fiction and nonfiction has been long-listed for awards in Russia such as the National Bestseller prize, the Big Book prize, and was nominated twice for GQ Russia's Writer of the Year. His book USSR: Diary of a Perestroika Kid is about growing up in the crumbling industrial city Mogilev during the last few years of the Soviet Union.
    • Readings and Writings Presented by UAA Undergraduate English Students

      University of Alaska Anchorage. Bookstore, 2014-12-03
      Faculty-chosen undergraduate creative writing students in the English Department come together to present their course work. Everyone is welcome to attend and be enchanted.
    • Readings with Richard, a poem

      Hope, Ishmael Khaagwáask’ (2015-08-20)
    • Recent Graduates of Mt. Edgecumbe: Why Did They Attend and How Has It Affected Their Lives?

      Hirshberg, Diane; DelMoral, Brit (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2008-04)
    • Recommendations for Updating the Alaska Department of Transportation Construction Project Documentation Manual

      O'Neill, Raymond (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-05-01)
      This project began as work sponsored by a multidisciplinary engineering consulting firm providing construction administration services to the State of Alaska Department of Transportation & Public Facilities (AKDOT). Managers in the firm’s construction administration department requested documentation protocols to assist staff in meeting their clients’ quality assurance objectives and improve the firm’s business performance. Construction administration (CA) refers to managing all project-related functions between parties to a construction contract. CA involves considerable field presence and construction experience. CA includes inspections, quality assurance, site safety, and other construction duties beyond contract administration (Fisk & Reynolds, 2006). The consultant’s AKDOT quality assurance assessments indicate the need for improved project documentation, and project managers realize that improved documentation processes are necessary for effective monitoring, controlling and closing of construction projects. The original scope of this project was to deliver a manual for documenting CA; however, research uncovered existing AKDOT manuals addressing documentation processes for CA. Therefore, the project delivers recommendations for updating the AKDOT Construction Project Documentation procedures manual published by Central Region AKDOT (AKDOT 2013). This manual is one of the resources identified as a reference for CA staff providing CA documentation. The research plan includes methods to identify areas of CA documentation where improvements will be recommended. The research consists of a survey of CA professionals, formal and informal interviews, and a literature review. Recommendations for updating the AKDOT Construction Documentation Manual are provided that will improve documentation quality and project communications, and will reduce the effort currently required for project closeout.
    • Recover Alaska: Healing Alaska's Alcohol Problems

      Rivera, Marny; Hall, Tiffany (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-12-23)
      This article provides an overview of the strategies being implemented by the Recover Alaska initiative in its mission to reduce excessive alcohol use and related harm in Alaska by influencing social norms and perceptions about alcohol use and abuse. Includes a list of online resources.
    • Recreation and Tourism in South-Central Alaska: Patterns and Prospects prepared for the US Forest Service Pacific Northwest Station

      Tomeo, Martha; Colt, Steve; Martin, Stephanie; Mieren, Jenna (U.S. Department of Agriculture (Forest Service) - Pacific Northwest Research Station, 2002)
      Based on data from various sources, this report describes the extent and nature of recreation and tourism in south-central Alaska. Current activities, past trends, and prospective developments are presented. Particular attention is given to activities that occur on, or are directly affected by management of, the Chugach National Forest. Recreation and tourism in and around the forest are also placed in a larger context. The Chugach National Forest is heavily used as a scenic resource by motorists and waterborne passengers; road access to the forest supports recreation activities such as fishing, camping, hiking, and wildlife viewing. Although the annual rate of increase in visitors to south-central Alaska seems to have slowed in the late 1990s, evidence indicates that currently both visitors and Alaska residents are increasingly seeking active forms of recreation and ?soft adventure.? These demands, combined with likely capacity constraints at well-known attractions in Alaska and entrepreneurial efforts to provide short-duration recreation and tourism experiences, may lead to increasing use of the Chugach National Forest.
    • Recreational Trails Program Applicant Accountability and Process Efficiency Project

      Harris, Darcy B. (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-04-01)
      The Recreational Trails Program provides reimbursable grant funding for recreational trail development and repair, and environmental protection and safety/education programs relating to recreational trail use. The Recreational Trails Program Applicant Accountability and Process Efficiency Project developed two tools to improve the effectiveness of the program, New grant applicants and current grantees require clear guidance about state and federal procurement requirements, federal regulations, and programmatic guidelines for the Recreational Trails Program in Alaska. The iterative tool and administrative controls created for this project will help to guide and inform the applicants and add legal protection for the State of Alaska, Department of Natural Resources (DNR) immediately and into the future. The Application Instruction and Information Manual (Manual) details the rules, regulations, requirements, and processes for compliance surrounding procurement and federal grants and is publically-available for applicants to utilize during the grant cycle. Legal language has been added to the signature page of the application so each applicant understands the importance of compliance and integrity when managing a federal grant. The Manual is intended to be a generalizable tool that will continue to evolve as different groups of stakeholders provide input and feedback with regard to its utility. This project was initiated to assist the majority of grant applicants with processes, regulations, and guidelines, increase comprehension and success, and reduce management time coaching and frustration for applicants. To a lesser degree but intended to mitigate a higher risk, this project researched, created, and added supplementary legal language into the application that will serve to both add a layer of legal protection for the DNR and remind applicants of their fiscal responsibilities when managing federal grant funds. The hypothesis for this project is that when applicants have an improved means by which to meet the requirements of the grant program they will become more self-sufficient, knowledgeable, successful, and compliant. It is the program manager’s responsibility to ensure compliance with federal and state regulations, as well as program guidance, and there are now effective tools and administrative controls to consistently achieve this.
    • Reducing Recidivism in Alaska Throough Access to Extended-Release Injectable Naltrexone

      Green, Jyll K. (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-12-01)
      The goal of this evidence-based project was to provide access to extended-release injectable naltrexone (XR-NTX) upon release from incarceration for individuals who had a self-identified substance or alcohol abuse history, and evaluate whether or not XR-NTX reduced recidivism in comparison with those who declined to use XR-NTX. This project was completed in collaboration with Partners Reentry Center, located in Anchorage, Alaska, who collected and offered retrospective de-identified data for this project. A total of 98 individuals with a self-identified history of substance or alcohol abuse were offered XR-NTX through Partners Reentry Center from September 15, 2015 to September 15, 2016. Of these, 52 were offered XR-NTX in the first six months of this evidenced-based quality improvement project. Of those who accepted XR-NTX (n = 32), 62% remained in the community at the end of 12 months from project initiation. Of those who declined XR-NTX (n = 20), 95% recidivated. The results of this project demonstrate the benefit of using XR-NTX in released prisoners to reduce recidivism. Implications for use the of XR-NTX in Alaska Department of Corrections inmates and the general population who meet criteria for use should be evaluated.
    • Referrals to the Alaska Division of Juvenile Justice: 2003–2008

      Rosay, André B. (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2009-10-01)
      This research overview presents statistics on juveniles referred by law enforcement agencies to the Alaska Division of Juvenile Justice (DJJ) from 2003 to 2008. Juveniles are referred to DJJ if there is probable cause that a youth (1) committed an offense which would be criminal if committed by an adult, (2) committed a felony traffic offense, or (3) committed an alcohol offense after two prior convictions in District Court for minor consuming. Adults may be referred to the Alaska Division of Juvenile Justice if their offenses were committed as juveniles.
    • Reflections on Surviving an Alaskan Childhood

      Newman, Leigh; Simpson, Sherry (University of Alaska Anchorage. Bookstore, 2013-04-24)
      Leigh Newman (author of Still Points North) and Sherry Simpson (CWLA/MFA program and author of Accidental Explorer) share memories, experiences, and the unusual influence of Alaska on the shaping of their adult lives.
    • Reflections on the Surplus Economy and the Alaska Permanent Fund

      Goldsmith, Scott (Institute for Public Economics (University of Alberta), 2001)
      The Alaska Permanent Fund was created in 1977, shortly after oil form Alaska's North Slope began flowing to market through the Trans-Alaska Pipeline. It was originally envisioned to serve two general purposes - to set aside a share of oil revenues for the benefit of future generations of Alaskans after the depletion of the oil reserves, and to keep a share of oil revenues out of the hands of the current generation of politicians who could be counted to spend it on wasteful government operations and capital expenditures....The issue is how to design a set of public fiscal institutions that, taking this new revenue into account, will maximize long-term social welfare. Paper presented at a conference held at the University of Alberta, Sept. 2001.
    • Refugee voices

      University of Alaska Anchorage. Bookstore, 2013-04-30
      A presentation on April 30, 2013 at the University of Alaska Anchorage's Bookstore. The Refugee Voices panel features refugees from Togo, Bhutan, Sudan and Somalia who have volunteered to share their refugee stories of struggle and survival. They will speak about the refugee situation abroad and what resettlement in the U.S. means for them. This presentation also features information about Refugee Assistance and Immigration Services in Anchorage.
    • Refugee Voices

      University of Alaska Anchorage. Bookstore, 2013-04-30
      The Refugee Voices panel features refugees from Togo, Bhutan, Sudan, and Somalia who have volunteered to share their refugee stories of struggle and survival. They will speak about the refugee situation abroad and what resettlement in the US means for them. This presentation also features information about refugee assistance and immigration services in Anchorage.
    • A Regional Assessment of Borough Government Finances And Employment

      Guettabi, Mouhcine (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2017-06-01)
      Alaska’s state budget revenues declined by more than 90% from 2012 to 2016, mainly due to a sharp drop in oil prices: oil revenues have paid for most state government operations since the 1980s. This loss of so much revenue has led to a shortfall of billions of dollars in the state budget and a sluggish economy. The health of a state’s tax revenues is critical to its economic growth and ability to finance public services. Considerable attention has been paid to the state’s fiscal woes, which are still ongoing. But the state also provides considerable support to Alaska’s local governments—and there has been little analysis of how the decline of state revenues might affect local governments. This analysis reports how much Alaska’s 19 borough governments rely on state aid—individually and as a group—and considers how vulnerable they are to cuts in state aid as time goes on. Alaska also has city governments, both within and outside organized boroughs, but here we look only at borough governments —which are essentially regional governments that, unlike cities, all have the same mandatory powers. We want to emphasize that our figures are estimates; boroughs report their revenues quite differently, and sometimes in ways that make it nearly impossible to identify allocations from the state. Alaska provides three main kinds of aid to local governments: aid for general government operating expenses (revenue sharing), grants for public works projects, and aid for schools. It has mostly relied on its oil wealth to fund that aid to local governments. Revenue sharing helps ensure that all areas of the state can pay for basic public services and have reasonably equitable and stable local tax rates. Aid to schools is a major part of the state’s budget, and it pays for a large share of school costs. State grants for local capital projects can vary sharply by year. In the years when oil prices were high—much of the time between 2008 and 2012—those grants were large. Since then, the state capital budget has shrunk to a small fraction of what it was a few years back.
    • Reign Consulting Business Plan

      Jessup, Colton T. (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2021-05-01)
      This project provides a business opportunity by creating a local business specializing in construction management consultation and land survey-related work. With heightened construction project demands, specifically in Northwest Alaska, contracts are beginning to be awarded to companies not local to Alaska. The region's opportunity for this type of company includes stakeholders but is not limited to mining, local government agencies, and local community organizations. This project creates a local business plan that will increase market share to locally owned and operated companies. The mining industry is vital for business feasibility as it starts. Following procedures detailed in this plan, the desire to start a company providing surveying, mapping services, and construction management is attainable. Relevant knowledge obtained as a land surveyor in training & Northwest Alaska Region shareholder offers a specialized skill set working in the region. This project applies project management principles to create a plan for developing a small consulting firm in Northwest Alaska and the present option for market and growth within Alaska's state
    • Reinhold Sackmann presents: Employers, Migrants, and Labor Markets in Germany case studies.

      Sackmann, Reinhold (University of Alaska Anchorage. Bookstore, 2014-04-02)
      A presentation on April 2, 2014 at the University of Alaska Anchorage's Bookstore. Reinhold Sackmann presents Employers, Migrants, and Labor Markets in Germany case studies. Reinhold Sackmann is professor at the Institute of Sociology, Martin Luther University in Halle-Wittenberg, Germany. His research interests include analyzing the social structure of modern societies, demographic changes in Germany, migrant workers, and public sector employment. At this event he will discuss economic and social attitudes toward non-German migrant workers in Germany. The event is sponsored with the UAA Sociology Department.