• Vaccination Hesitation: Investigation Why Parents Decline Pediatric Influenza Vaccines in Juneau, Alaska

      Leder, Lindsey (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-04-14)
      The influenza virus is responsible for hundreds of childhood deaths and costs the health care system millions of dollars each year (Hassan, Lewis, Davis, Gebremariam, and Dombkowski, 2009). The influenza vaccine is the most effective intervention for prevention of pediatric influenza, yet many parents decline this vaccine for their children. Studies completed in various geographic locations cite different factors influencing parents who decline pediatric vaccinations. Alaska has the second lowest rate of influenza vaccination in the country (Center for Disease Control [CDC], 2012). The purpose of this project was to understand the factors that influence parental decision to refuse influenza vaccination in Juneau, Alaska. A modified version of the Childhood Influenza Immunization Questionnaire, an instrument based on the Health Belief Model, was utilized to collect data from a convenience sample of parents at a private pediatric practice in Juneau, AK. Statistical analysis revealed the only significant influencing factor on parents’ decisions on whether to vaccinate against influenza was their perception of vaccine risk (p < .001). Information obtained from this study will be used to educate local providers in the community with the goal of enabling said providers to overcome resistance to vaccination hesitancy based on parent perceptions.
    • Vaccine implementation: Alaska 2017

      Hulstine, Amanda (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2017-05-01)
      Bacterial meningitis is a serious disease that causes permanent dysfunction or death; adolescents and young adults carry the greatest risk. The national Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) has released vaccine recommendations that include incorporation of meningitis vaccine in to the mandatory school vaccine schedule. Throughout the nation, much of legislative policy has made meningitis vaccination a requirement for public school attendance. Alaska does not have such policy; the purpose of the project was to address this policy need. A secondary project goal was to increase community awareness of bacterial meningitis. Project actions were divided into policy advocacy and community awareness. Policy advocacy included the development of a Policy Brief to Persuade designed for the Alaska legislative health care committee members. A legislative survey to assess willingness to incorporate a required meningitis vaccine schedule into existing Alaska vaccine policy was sent electronically with the policy brief. Community awareness interventions included the development of a Meningitis Education Bundle for healthcare professionals and a Protect Alaska’s Future campaign. The education bundle was distributed to local health establishments on Prince of Wales Island and the campaign information was distributed at the 2017 Prince of Wales Community Health Fair. Project outcomes demonstrated a lack of response to the policy survey. Efforts must continue over time with a deliberate plan to gain legislative support for the incorporation of a meningitis vaccination schedule into existing Alaska vaccine policy, as recommended by the ACIP. Community awareness activities at the health fair were successful and should continue.
    • The Value of Evidence-Based Computer Simulation of Oral Health Outcomes for Management Analysis of the Alaska Dental Health Aide Program

      Kiley, Daniel P.; Haley, Sharman; Saylor, Ben; Saylor, Brian L. (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2008-03)
      Objectives: To create an evidence‐based research tool to inform and guide policy and program managers as they develop and deploy new service delivery models for oral disease prevention and intervention. Methods: A village‐level discrete event simulation was developed to project outcomes associated with different service delivery patterns. Evidence‐ based outcomes were associated with dental health aide activities, and projected indicators (DMFT, F+ST, T‐health, SiC, CPI, ECC) were proxy for oral health outcomes. Model runs representing the planned program implementation, a more intensive staffing scenario, and a more robust prevention scenario, generated 20‐year projections of clinical indicators; graphs and tallies were analyzed for trends and differences. Results: Outcomes associated with alternative patterns of service delivery indicate there is potential for substantial improvement in clinical outcomes with modest program changes. Not all segments of the population derive equal benefit when program variables are altered. Children benefit more from increased prevention, while adults benefit more from intensive staffing. Conclusions: Evidence‐ based simulation is a useful tool to analyze the impact of changing program variables on program outcome measures. This simulation informs dental managers of the clinical outcomes associated with policy and service delivery variables. Simulation tools can assist public health managers in analyzing and understanding the relationship between their policy decisions and long‐term clinical outcomes.
    • Value of Stolen Property Reported in Alaska, 1985–2016

      Reamey, Random (Alaska Justice Information Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-01-22)
      This fact sheet presents data on the value of stolen property reported in Alaska from 1985 to 2016 as reported in the Department of Public Safety publication Crime in Alaska. Overall, the 31-year trend reveals that the total value of stolen property in Alaska was relatively static with a trough beginning in 2008 and rising in 2014. The increase in stolen property value from 2014 to 2016 was mainly due to increases in the aggregate values of stolen motor vehicles and miscellaneous items. After adjusting for inflation, the highest total value of stolen property was recorded in 1990 at $61,651,724. The lowest total value of stolen property recorded was in 2011 at $22,189,499. Of the different property types, motor vehicles represented the largest value and share of stolen property. On average, motor vehicles were 53.7% ($24,246,790 per year) of the total value of stolen property.
    • Ventures in Social Media

      Burgert, Lisa; Nann, Alejandra; Sterling, Lorelei (Louisiana Chapter of the Association of College and Research Libraries, 2014)
      Academic libraries are actively involved in social media platforms as part of their campus communities. They have moved past the debate of whether to participate in social media and are focusing on strategies to develop engaging content and assessment of their efforts. Social media use in the campus classroom continues to grow with more faculty using social media in academic context. Given the widespread adoption of social media on the University of San Diego campus Copley Library formed a Social Media Committee (SMC) to manage the library’s social media presence with a mission to promoting the library’s services and events. After establishing Facebook and Twitter accounts the committee looked to expand their presence on other platforms. To determine which social media platforms undergraduates were using, the committee designed and administered a survey in the fall of 2013. The survey confirmed that USD undergraduates were still using Facebook and showed 56% now use multiple social media sites: Twitter, Pinterest, Tumblr, and Instagram. The SMC diversified onto Instagram and Pinterest platforms to interact with students on visual platforms.
    • A Very Brief Introduction to Alaska’s Economy

      Knapp, Gunnar (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2013-06)
    • Victim-Offender Mediation in Anchorage

      Trostle, Lawrence C.; Cunningham, Patrick (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1994-10)
      Victim-offender mediation programs provide an opportunity for victims to meet the offenders face-to-face in the presence of a trained mediator for the purpose of resolving the injury of the crime in some way. Mediation is offered as a diversion from the justice system which the offender may accept to avoid more formal adjudication. This paper describes a pilot victim-offender mediation program in Anchorage which involves juveniles accused of certain offenses and the victims of those crimes.
    • Victim-Suspect Relationship in Sexual Assault Cases Reported to Law Enforcement: Alaska and National Data

      Rosay, André B.; Amundson, Steven (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2009-04-01)
      An overview of key research findings nationally and in Alaska on the relationships between victims and suspects in sexual assault cases.
    • Violence against American Indian and Alaska Native Women and Men

      Rosay, André B. (U.S. Department of Justice, National Institute of Justice, 2016-09)
      More than four in five American Indian and Alaska Native women and men have experienced violence in their lifetime, and more than one in three experienced violence in the past year, according to a new report from an NIJ-funded study. The study, part of NIJ's research program on violence against American Indian and Alaska Native women, looked at how prevalent psychological aggression and physical violence by intimate partners, stalking, and sexual violence were among American Indian and Alaska Native women and men. It also examined the perpetrators' race and the impact of the violence.
    • Violence against American Indian and Alaska Native Women and Men: 2010 Findings from the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey

      Rosay, André B. (U.S. Department of Justice, National Institute of Justice, 2016-05)
      This report examines the prevalence of violence against American Indian and Alaska Native women and men, using a large nationally representative sample from the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS). More specifically, it provides estimates of sexual violence, physical violence by intimate partners, stalking, and psychological aggression by intimate partners. It also provides estimates of interracial and intraracial victimizations and briefly examines the impact of violence. Results should be used to raise awareness and understanding about violence against American Indian and Alaska Native women and men.
    • Violence against American Indian and Alaska Native Women and Men: 2010 Findings from the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey

      Rosay, André B. (U.S. Department of Justice, National Institute of Justice, 2016-05-18)
      This Powerpoint, presented as part of a webinar held at the National Indigenous Women's Resource Center (NIWRC), examines findings from a study of the prevalence of violence against American Indian and Alaska Native women. Few estimates are available to describe the prevalence of violence experienced by American Indian (AI) and Alaska Native (AN) women and men. In addition, these estimates are often based on local rather than national samples. The few available national estimates are often based on very small samples. These small samples do not always accurately represent the AI and AN population in the United States. This study provides the first set of estimates from a national large-scale survey of victimization among self-identified AI and AN men and women on psychological aggression, coercive control and entrapment, physical violence, stalking, and sexual violence, using detailed behaviorally specific questions. These results are expected to raise awareness and understanding of violence experienced by AI and AN people. The webinar also will highlight the need for additional services that are needed for AI and AN victims of crime—a need that has been persistently noted but lacked the research to support efforts to increase resources or allocate them appropriately.
    • Violence against Women in Alaska: Justice Perspective

      Rosay, André B. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2013-12-09)
      This Powerpoint slide presentation provides an overview of UAA Justice Center research on violence against women in Alaska through 2013, the current research being conducted through the Alaska Victimization Survey, and efforts to combat intimate partner violence (IPV) and sexual violence in Alaska through the Choose Respect initiative.
    • Violent and Property Offenses in Alaska, 2002–2010

      Parker, Khristy (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2012-07-01)
      This research overview presents crime rates and number of offenses for violent and property crimes in Alaska known to police from 2002 to 2010. Figures presented, from the FBI's Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) program, are for seven of the eight serious offenses defined as Part I offenses: murder/non-negligent manslaughter, forcible rape, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, larceny-theft, and motor vehicle theft. (UCR does not report the other Part I offense, arson, by state. For arson arrests, see Research Overview numbers 15 and 16). Alaska figures for 2010 are compared with those for five other western U.S. states — Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Washington, and Wyoming.
    • Violent and Property Offenses in Anchorage, 2003–2007

      Myrstol, Brad A.; Parker, Khristy (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2009-03-01)
      Presents crime rates and number of offenses for violent and property crimes in Anchorage known to police from 2003 to 2007. Figures presented, from the FBI's Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) program, are for the eight serious offenses defined as Part I offenses: murder/non-negligent manslaughter, forcible rape, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, larceny-theft, motor vehicle theft, and arson.
    • Violent and Property Offenses in Anchorage, 2003–2008

      Myrstol, Brad A. (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2009-06-01)
      Presents crime rates and number of offenses for violent and property crimes in Anchorage known to police from 2003 to 2008. Figures presented, from the FBI's Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) program, are for the eight serious offenses defined as Part I offenses: murder/non-negligent manslaughter, forcible rape, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, larceny-theft, motor vehicle theft, and arson. Figures for 2008 are compared with those for five other western U.S. cities — Boise, Colorado Springs, Portland, Salt Lake City, and Spokane.
    • Violent and Property Offenses in Anchorage, 2003–2009

      Parker, Khristy (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2011-04-01)
      This research overview presents information on serious violent and property crimes reported to Anchorage police for 2003–2009 collected as part of the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s Uniform Crime Reporting Program (UCR).
    • Violent Crime Arrests in Alaska

      Myrstol, Brad A. (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2013-01)
      This fact sheet presents data for 1980–2011 on violent crime arrests in Alaska: murder/non-negligent manslaughter, forcible rape, robbery, and aggravated assault. Data is drawn from the annual Crime in Alaska report of the Alaska Department of Public Safety, which represents the State of Alaska's contribution to the FBI's Uniform Crime Reports (UCR) program.
    • Violent Crime Reported in Alaska, 1986–2015

      Parker, Khristy (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2017-02-20)
      This fact sheet presents data on violent crimes reported in Alaska from 1986 to 2015 as reported in the Alaska Department of Public Safety publication Crime in Alaska. "Violent crime" is an aggregate category that includes homicide (murder and non-negligent manslaughter), rape, robbery, and aggravated assault offenses reported to police. From 1986 to 2015, violent crime rates increased in Alaska although the overall crime rate decreased. Homicide and robbery rates declined over the 30-year period, while rape and aggravated assault rates increased from 1986 to 2015 – with aggravated assault acting as the main driver of increases in the violent crime rate over the period. On average, violent crime accounted for 11 percent of all crime reported in Alaska from 1986 to 2015. Aggravated assault accounted for nearly three-quarters, robbery for nearly 15 percent, rape for nearly 13 percent, and homicide for just over one percent of all violent crime reported in Alaska over the period.
    • Violent Crimes Compensation Board: Claims, FY 2004–FY 2014

      Parker, Khristy (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-04-01)
      This fact sheet presents data from the Alaska Violent Crimes Compensation Board (VCCB) on claims made and compensation granted to victims of violent crime for fiscal years 2004–2014. The report presents data on new claims filed, types of crime and types of expenses for which compensation was claimed, and compensation totals. On average, the five most common violent crimes resulting in applications for compensation over the eleven-year period were sexual abuse of a minor, domestic violence, assault, sexual assault of adults, and homicide.
    • Visiting Rules and Regulations: A Preliminary Study

      Schafer, N. E. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1988-04-04)
      Visiting rules and regulations from 71 long-term adult correctional facilities from 31 states were collected for review. The rules are divided into five areas: visitor application, visitor processing, contraband, conduct, and dress codes. They are reviewed in the light of recent standards which stress the importance of encouraging visits. Suggestions and recommendations for change are included.