• Walking the Talk: A Guide to Assessment Using the CAPRA Community Problem Solving Model

      Wood, Darryl S.; Rieger, Lisa (Alaska Native Technical Assistance and Resource Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2001-03)
      CAPRA is a community problem-solving model with five stages: C = Clients, A = Analysis, P = Partnership, R = Response, and A = Assessment. CAPRA was the problem-solving method used by the Alaska Native and Technical Resource Center (ANTARC). This guide describes the final stage of the CAPRA model—assessment—including the reasons for conducing an assessment, the documentation needed and why it is needed, and methods for evaluation. Discussion is with a particular focus on assessment methods for community problem-solvers in rural Alaska Native villages. Some background about CAPRA is assumed.
    • Webnote 21. The Growing Number of Alaska Children in Foster Care, 2011-2015

      Passini, Jessica; Vadapalli, Diwakar (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 3/1/2016)
    • What are the economic impacts of the vetoes?

      Guettabi, Mouhcine (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2019-07-08)
    • What are the economic impacts of the vetoes?

      Guettabi, Mouhcine (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 7/8/2019)
    • What are the Implications of the Fiscal Options?

      Guettabi, Mouhcine (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-10-01)
    • What do we know about Narcan Utilization among Alaskans? Findings from 3 years

      Porter, Rebecca; Druffel, Ryan; Hanson, Bridget (Center for Behavioral Health Research & Services, 1/22/2020)
    • What do we know about the Alaska economy and where is it heading?

      Guettabi, Mouhcine (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1/1/2017)
    • What do we know about the effects of the Alaska Permanent Fund Dividend?

      Guettabi, Mouhcine (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2019-05-20)
      The Alaska Permanent Fund Dividend (PFD) has been distributed to Alaska residents for 37 years, providing each resident an equal share of a yearly government appropriation based on the earnings of the Alaska Permanent Fund. While support for the program is high, work assessing the PFD’s influence on the lives of Alaskans is limited. Recently, a number of researchers have analyzed the causal effect of the PFD on a variety of socio-economic outcomes including employment, consumption, income inequality, health, and crime. This paper summarizes this empirical literature and highlights future areas of research.
    • What do we know about the effects of the Alaska Permanent Fund Dividend?

      Guettabi, Mouhcine (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 5/20/2019)
      The Alaska Permanent Fund Dividend (PFD) has been distributed to Alaska residents for 37 years, providing each resident an equal share of a yearly government appropriation based on the earnings of the Alaska Permanent Fund. While support for the program is high, work assessing the PFD�s influence on the lives of Alaskans is limited. Recently, a number of researchers have analyzed the causal effect of the PFD on a variety of socio-economic outcomes including employment, consumption, income inequality, health, and crime. This paper summarizes this empirical literature and highlights future areas of research.
    • What do we know and where are we heading? An Assessment of the Alaska Economy

      Guettabi, Mouhcine (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-05-11)
    • What do we know to date about the Alaska recession and the fiscal crunch?

      Guettabi, Mouhcine (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-01-01)
      We provide a broad overview of the state’s economic and fiscal conditions. We show how the economic contraction has spread away from natural resource and mining and state government to household spending dependent sectors. We also show that while the rate at which jobs are being lost has slowed, it is inaccurate to think about that as a sign of a recovery. That is because the engine of growth that is O&G employment as of June 2017 was only 75% of what it was in 2014. Additionally, the softness in spending activity may linger for an extended period of time. We also assess the regional effects of the recession and show the significant heterogeneity in experience. Unsurprisingly, areas with economic bases not associated with Oil and Gas and with relatively little dependence on state government spending are holding up best. After establishing an understanding of the economic conditions, we offer a back of the envelope calculation of the capital investment losses associated with the fiscal uncertainty. Then, we provide a comparison of Alaska’s taxes relative to the rest of the US, and a simulation of the effects of different withdrawal amounts on the permanent fund balance and the earnings reserve.
    • What does the future hold for Alaska: Fiscal Planning in the face of uncertainty

      Guettabi, Mouhcine (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-02-05)
    • What does the future hold for Alaska: Fiscal Planning in the face of uncertainty

      Guettabi, Mouhcine (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2/1/2015)
    • What does the future hold for Alaska: Fiscal Planning in the face of uncertainty

      Guettabi, Mouhcine (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-02-01)
    • What Drives The Alaska Economy?

      Goldsmith, Oliver Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2008-12)
      What drives Alaska’s economy is new money: money coming in from outside the state. How big the economy is, and how much it grows, depends on how much new money comes in. New money comes from “basic” sectors— the sectors that are the basis for all jobs and income across Alaska. They are, in effect, the gears driving the economy. Alaska has eight main basic sectors, but the number of Alaskans they employ directly is small, compared with the number of jobs they support indirectly. Figure 1 shows numbers and shares of jobs for Alaskans that the federal government, the petroleum sector, and the other basic sectors generated on average between 2004 and 2006. The numbers for any specific period aren’t as important as the percentages, which don’t change much from year to year.
    • What drives the cost of education in Alaska?

      DeFeo, Dayna (Center for Alaska Education Policy Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2019-04-15)
    • What patients want: Relevant health information technology for diabetes self-management.

      King, Diane (Springer, 2015-03-05)
      Health information technology has great potential to promote efficiency in patient care and increase patient-provider communication, and patient engagement in their treatment. This paper explored qualitatively what patients with type 2 diabetes want from electronic resources that are designed to support their diabetes self-management. Data were collected via interviews and focus groups from managed care patients who had completed participation in either a web-based (MyPath) or in-person group-based (¡Viva Bien!) longitudinal diabetes self-management study. Content analysis identified common themes that highlighted participant interest in virtual and electronic programs to support diabetes self-management goals, and their desired content and features. Eighteen ¡Viva Bien! participants completed telephone interviews and 30 MyPath participants attended seven focus groups in 2010-2011. All participants expressed a preference for face-to-face contact; however, most participants were also interested in using technology as a tool to support daily diabetes self-management decisions and to receive tailored information. Choice of technology, personalized instruction on how to use program features, and the ability to exchange information with their healthcare team were desired by all participants. Participants were divided on whether virtual social support networks should be closed to friends and family, should include other program members (peers), or should be open to anyone with diabetes. Participants aged 65 and older stressed the desire for technical support. What patients wanted from technology is real-time assistance with daily behavioral decision-making, ability to share information with their healthcare team, connections with others for support, and choice.
    • What role can regional economics plan in addressing health questions?

      Guettabi, Mouhcine (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-01-01)
    • When Mental Illness Becomes a Police Matter

      UAA Justice Center (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2017-10-18)
      Mental illness is not a police matter in and of itself and most people with mental illness (MI) are not involved in the criminal justice system. When police do interact with an individual with MI, care needs to be taken not to label the person as the problem but to focus on behavior that causes harm to self and others.
    • Whitepaper reports to the Municipality of Anchorage - Education

      Cueva, Katie; DeFeo, Dayna (Center for Alaska Education Policy Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2020-05-05)