• Goals into Action: An Evaluation Report on the Third Bush Justice Conference

      Havelock, John E. (Criminal Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1977-04-23)
      This evaluation reports on the Third Bush Justice Conference, held in Kenai, Alaska on November 8–12, 1976. Prior bush justice conferences were held at Alyeska (1970) and Minto (1974). The report outlines themes addressed in all the bush justice conferences, focuses on ways in which bush justice conferences can improve the administration of justice in rural Alaska, and recommends ways in which state justice agencies and Alaska Native representatives can work together proactively to respond to specific problems identified at conferences.
    • Going Private: The 1968 Sale of the Alaska Communication System

      Jones, Douglas; Tuck, Bradford (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 1997)
      Putting the Alaska long-distance system in private hands was a public policy success. Except for improved service for bush communities, the goals of the sale were all met or exceeded within 10 years. Problems with the adequacy, quality, and reliability of service persisted under RCA. Some problems can be traced to the ownership and management of RC - but the fast growth of demand; an uncertain regulatory environment; lack of a comprehensive telecommunications plan; and state intervention in the industry also contributed. This summary is based on Privatization of State-Owned Utility Enterprises: the Alaska Case Revisited Thirty Years Later, by Douglas N. Jones and Bradford H. Tuck.
    • Gold Nuggets: Denali Then and Now

      Lovegreen, Lynn; Lovegreen, Mark; Bale, Nancy (University of Alaska Anchorage. Bookstore, 2015-04-04)
      Lynn Lovegreen's Gold Rush series includes: Worth Her Weight in Gold (Juneau, 1886); Fool's Gold (Skagway, 1898), Quicksilver to Gold (Nome, 1900); Golden Days (Fairbanks, 1906); Gold Nuggets (Denali and Kantishna, 1916). Lynn Lovegreen was raised and lives in Anchorage, Alaska and has taught at the Anchorage School District. Mark Lovegreen, veteran tour driver in Denali National Park and Preserve, adds information on the natural history of the area. And Nancy Bale, board member of the Denali Citizens Council, provides perspective on the environmental movement of Denali Park.
    • Good collaborations: A case study of the Health Information Technology partnership

      DeFeo, Dayna Jean (Center for Alaska Education Policy Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-01-01)
      The Health Information Technology grant was a collaborative partnership between the Cook Inlet Tribal Council (CITC), the University of Alaska Community & Technical College (UAA CTC) and the University of Alaska Southeast (UAS) to establish the infrastructure for a distance-delivered Occupational Endorsement in Health Information Technology. This document describes a case study research project that explored the activities of the collaboration, specifically as they pertain to student services and outcomes. Student eligibility criteria included: Alaska Native, low-income, GED or high school diploma, and a 10th grade TABE test score; many of the student participants exhibited demographic characteristics that placed them at high risk for noncompletion. Ultimately, 10 of 25 (40%) completed the credential, and of these graduates, five are continuing their postsecondary studies for an associate’s or bachelor’s degree. These success rates that exceed national averages for community college students prompted the team to explore the program elements that contributed to student success. A qualitative case study collected interview data from student completers, program staff, and faculty. It also reviewed program documents, and included visits to the physical spaces where the program was delivered. Tangible or material resources that contributed to the program’s success included stipends for student tuition and fees plus hourly compensation for time spent in class; the provision of laptops; adequate technology; staff and services that supported college transitions, social and personal needs, and academic success; a face-to-face kickoff event; and a cohort model. Qualitative aspects of the program that fostered success include staff commitment and positive attitude; clear roles for partners with a distributed workload; alignment of program objectives to each of the partners’ missions; communication; and student perseverance. Program elements that need to be revised, expanded, or improved prior to a second iteration include course sequencing, recruitment, technology, class times, and additional stipends. Opportunities for additional programming include industry involvement, career exploration, options for students who “change majors” or decide that the HIT field is not a good fit for their interests, job seeking and career planning support, additional attention to college readiness and soft skills, and incorporation of Alaska Native culture. A review of program elements that worked and need improvement identified opportunities to better align theory and philosophy, and to strengthen communication between staff and faculty who have complementary responsibilities to one another and to students. These discussions are recommended in order to develop more intentional and focused recruiting, to strengthen communication, and to develop a more culturally responsive curriculum. Though the program does not yet present itself as a best practice model, the program strengths and lessons learned were used to develop considerations for other programs and partnerships wishing to develop similar delivery methods.
    • Good collaborations: A case study of the Health Information Technology partnership

      DeFeo, Dayna Jean (Center for Alaska Education Policy Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-01-01)
      The Health Information Technology grant was a collaborative partnership between the Cook Inlet Tribal Council (CITC), the University of Alaska Community & Technical College (UAA CTC) and the University of Alaska Southeast (UAS) to establish the infrastructure for a distance-delivered Occupational Endorsement in Health Information Technology. This document describes a case study research project that explored the activities of the collaboration, specifically as they pertain to student services and outcomes. Student eligibility criteria included: Alaska Native, low-income, GED or high school diploma, and a 10th grade TABE test score; many of the student participants exhibited demographic characteristics that placed them at high risk for noncompletion. Ultimately, 10 of 25 (40%) completed the credential, and of these graduates, five are continuing their postsecondary studies for an associate’s or bachelor’s degree. These success rates that exceed national averages for community college students prompted the team to explore the program elements that contributed to student success. A qualitative case study collected interview data from student completers, program staff, and faculty. It also reviewed program documents, and included visits to the physical spaces where the program was delivered. Tangible or material resources that contributed to the program’s success included stipends for student tuition and fees plus hourly compensation for time spent in class; the provision of laptops; adequate technology; staff and services that supported college transitions, social and personal needs, and academic success; a face-to-face kickoff event; and a cohort model. Qualitative aspects of the program that fostered success include staff commitment and positive attitude; clear roles for partners with a distributed workload; alignment of program objectives to each of the partners’ missions; communication; and student perseverance. Program elements that need to be revised, expanded, or improved prior to a second iteration include course sequencing, recruitment, technology, class times, and additional stipends. Opportunities for additional programming include industry involvement, career exploration, options for students who “change majors” or decide that the HIT field is not a good fit for their interests, job seeking and career planning support, additional attention to college readiness and soft skills, and incorporation of Alaska Native culture. A review of program elements that worked and need improvement identified opportunities to better align theory and philosophy, and to strengthen communication between staff and faculty who have complementary responsibilities to one another and to students. These discussions are recommended in order to develop more intentional and focused recruiting, to strengthen communication, and to develop a more culturally responsive curriculum. Though the program does not yet present itself as a best practice model, the program strengths and lessons learned were used to develop considerations for other programs and partnerships wishing to develop similar delivery methods.
    • Good collaborations: A case study of the Health Information Technology partnership

      Defeo, Dayna (Center for Alaska Education Policy Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1/1/2016)
    • Graduates of Alaska's Teacher Preparation Programs-Where Are They Now?

      Hill, Alexandra (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2007)
      This presentation includes a review of the sources of data, and presents preliminary findings on graduates of initial certification programs in Alaska. It's purpose was to collect feedback on what analyses to add, refine, and revise. Data is presented in a series of charts and graphs with interpretations. We matched teacher program graduation data with Department of Labor data on Permanent Fund Dividend applications – a proxy for Alaska residence. Most people are eligible for a PFD by the time they complete a teacher preparation program here, so we looked at graduates who completed their programs between 2001 and 2003, and PFD applications from 2003 to 2005. Only 10% did not apply for a PFD in 2003,. We expected that number to rise if teachers moved out of state. Teachers who leave Alaska schools but remain in Alaska continue to apply for the PFD; those who don’t apply have probably left the state. By 2005, 16% no longer applied for a PFD and were probably no longer in Alaska. Further information is available in a summary and full report with a similar title.
    • A Great Disobedience against the People: Japan's Siberian Intervention, 1918-1922.

      Dunscomb, Paul E. (University of Alaska Anchorage. Bookstore, 2011-04-04)
      Paul Dunscomb is Associate Professor of East Asian History at the University of Alaska Anchorage and Director of UAA's Confucius Institute. He specializes in the domestic political aspects of Japan's Siberian Intervention, 1918-1922, Japanese popular culture, and the Lost Decade, 1992-2003. His work has appeared in the Journal of Japanese studies, East-West Connections, and Education About Asia. His just released book is called Japan's Siberian Intervention, 1918-1922: A Great Disobedience Against the People.
    • The Great Salmon Run: Competition Between Wild and Farmed Salmon

      Knapp, Gunnar; Roheim, Cathy; Anderson, James (TRAFFIC North America, 2007)
      This report examines economic and policy issues related to wild and farmed salmon in North America. These issues have received a great deal of attention in recent years, reflecting the environmental, economic and cultural importance of salmon to Americans—and the fact that salmon issues span many important policy debates ranging from environmental protection to trade policy. The salmon industry has experienced dramatic change over the past two decades. Two major trends gave rise to many of the issues discussed in this report. The first trend is the rapid and sustained growth in world farmed salmon and salmon trout production, from two percent of world supply in 1980 to 65 percent of world supply in 2004. The growth of farmed salmon and the decline in the value of wild salmon has given rise to two broad sets of questions: • How has salmon farming affected wild salmon resources and the wild salmon industry? • What should be done to protect wild salmon resources and strengthen the wild salmon industry?"
    • The Great Uncomformity

      Troll, Kate (University of Alaska Anchorage. Bookstore, 2017-04-24)
      Kate Troll's new book, The Great Unconformity: Reflections on Hope in an Imperiled World, is an adventure memoir wrapped up in the global events of sustainability and climate change. Kate Troll is an activist on the front line of climate change. With twenty-two years of experience in fish politics, coastal management, and energy policy, as well as being an elected official, her insights, advice, and guidance--including "hope spots"--on how to proceed in our changing times will be shared. Executive Director of the Alaska Conservation Voters, Executive Director for United Fisherman of Alaska, Fisheries development specialist and policy analyst for the State of Alaska, Regional Fisheries Director (North and South America) for the Marine stewardship Council, a global eco-label program, elected twice to public office, serving on the Juneau-Douglas Bourough and on the Ketchikan Borough Assemblies.
    • Green Bay Chronic Nuisance Notification Evaluation, 2006–2010

      Payne, Troy C.; Arneson, Michelle (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2012-09-04)
      Green Bay City Ordinance Chapter 28 allows the City of Green Bay, Wisconsin to recover the cost of providing police services for chronic nuisances. Enforcement of Chapter 28 began in October 2006 and continues as of this writing. This report examined calls for service at properties with chronic nuisance enforcement to determine if enforcement was associated with a reduction in calls for service. Enforcing the chronic nuisance ordinance is associated with reduced calls for service but is costly in terms of officer and analyst hours. The best use of the chronic nuisance ordinance may be as a credible threat to entice property owners to partner with the Green Bay Police Department on crime prevention and nuisance abatement efforts.
    • Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Inventory From Transportation UAA

      Meléndez, Alejandra Villalobos; Gerd, Sarah Christine; Fay, Ginny (2011-01)
    • Growing Minds and Strengthening Communities: An Economic Valuation Study of the Anchorage Public Library

      Ralph, Kelsey (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2008-06-01)
      As one of the oldest educational and research institutions in the community, the Anchorage Public Library has been an important resource for enriching the daily lives and empowering the future of the people of Anchorage for many generations. While it has long been recognized that the Anchorage Public Library is an important part of the community, this study is the first to provide an economic valuation for the many benefits offered by APL. This report was commissioned by the Anchorage Public Library to determine the benefits of the library, and where possible, assign a dollar value to those benefits. The report proves that not only is APL still an irreplaceable resource for education and research, it contributes many substantial benefits that are not replicated anywhere else in the community.
    • The Growing Number of Alaska Children in Foster Care, 2011-2015

      Vadapalli, Diwakar; Passini, Jessica (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-03-01)
      The number of Alaska children in foster care was up sharply in 2015, with the average monthly number jumping more than 20%. We don’t have the data to document why the number went up, but state officials have said it might be partly because the Office of Children’s Services (OCS) is investigating more cases and taking more aggressive measures to protect children and avoid another spate of child deaths, as happened in 2014. Recent news reports also point to increased abuse of heroin among parents as potentially contributing to more child abuse and neglect.
    • Growing our own: Recruiting Alaska�s youth and paraprofessionals into teaching

      Defeo, Dayna; Tran, Trang (Center for Alaska Education Policy Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 9/12/2019)
      Good teachers are critical to student success, and Alaska faces significant challenges in staffing its public schools. About 200 new teachers graduate from Alaska colleges every year, but the state needs to hire many more than that to fill open positions. This paper explores two key Grow Your Own (GYO) initiatives: education career exploration courses for high school students and career pathways for paraprofessional educators. It reviews the current literature on these initiatives, outlines Alaska's efforts in these areas, and makes policy recommendations.
    • Growing up Anchorage 2015: Anchorage Youth and Young Adult Behavioral Health and Wellness Assessment

      Heath, Karen; Garcia, Gabriel M.; Hanson, Bridget; Rivera, Marny; Hedwig, Travis; Moras, Rebekah; Reed, Danielle; Smith, Curtis; Craig, Sylvia (University of Alaska Anchorage Center For Human Development, 2015-01-01)
      This report presents results of a community assessment to evaluate behavioral health indicators and related demographic, social, economic, and environmental factors pertaining to youth and young adults aged 9–24 in Anchorage, Alaska, focusing on three major areas: substance use, mental health, and suicide. The Anchorage Collaborative Coalitions (ACC), made up of four organizations (Healthy Voices, Healthy Choices; Anchorage Youth Development Coalition; Spirit of Youth; and Alaska Injury Prevention Center), contracted with the University of Alaska Anchorage Center for Human Development (CHD) to do a community assessment on substance use, mental health and suicide. The population for this assessment was youth and young adults in the Municipality of Anchorage. The assessment was completed in two phases. Phase I was a review of existing data from national, state, and local sources (referred to as “secondary data” in the complete report). Phase II focused on the collection and analysis of new data from surveys and focus groups (referred to as “primary data” in the complete report). One goal of the assessment was to engage coalition and community members in the process. Coalition and community partners assisted throughout the process by helping define the gaps in existing data, helping define the areas of interest, and helping identify the focus of new data collection. They attended trainings on data collection and analysis, participated in community discussions about the findings, and participated in focus group data collection and analysis. Alaska’s youth and young adults are impacted by substance use, mental health, and suicide in significant ways. These behavioral health concerns are often interconnected and can have severe consequences. Substance use can lead to problems with school, the law and to youth taking risks that can lead to serious injury or death. Substance use in adolescence can put youth at higher risk for major life impairments and chronic conditions, including severe mental illness. Poor mental health in youth and young adults can lead to poorer physical health in adulthood, higher rates of chronic illnesses, and earlier death. Mental health and substance use disorders are likely the third leading cause of suicide deaths. In 2012, the Centers for Disease Control ranked Alaska as the second highest state in the nation for per capita suicide deaths. Family members and friends of people who die by suicide experience feelings of guilt, anger, abandonment, and shock. Also, these friends and family members are often at a higher risk for committing suicide in the future.
    • Guidelines and consideration for construction contractors using commodity futures as hedging tools for mitigating construction material pricing risk

      Ivanoff, Ian (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2017-05-01)
      Many would argue that risk management is the single most important element of a construction contractor's business enterprise. A significant risk to a contractor’s profitability is increased costs of construction materials. In many cases construction materials are the largest single component of a construction project budget. Contractors generally utilize contingency funds or contractual price adjustments clauses to address the risk associated with changes in construction material pricing. However, the use of contingency and contractual mechanisms comes at a cost. The additional costs are especially detrimental in construction markets that are competitively bid, because higher bid prices result in winning fewer jobs. An alternative risk mitigation is the use of commodity futures to hedge the risk of increasing construction material prices. A hedge is strategy for limiting losses by holding a portfolio of noncorrelated assets. The research of this study evaluates the application of commodity futures for hedging material pricing risk in the construction industry. Through statistical analysis and simulation studies this research concludes that utilizing commodity futures as a hedging strategy is effective risk mitigation against increased construction material costs. In addition, through a literature review this study explains the fundamentals of the commodity future market, and presents the mechanics of trading commodity futures. A guideline for using commodity futures as a hedging tool is included in this study.
    • Gulf of Alaska Coastal Communities: An Overview

      Hull, Teresa; Larson, Eric (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 1999)
      The Gulf of Alaska Coastal Communities Coalition is helping Gulf Coast communities find ways to promote development and preserve lifestyles. To assist the Coalition, researchers at the Institute of Social and Economic Research have gathered and organized information for a selection of Gulf Coast communities. The information provides a basis for community residents, the Coalition, Native corporations, regulatory agencies, and others to make decisions about development in these communities. This report summarizes the assembled data and identifies patterns, trends, and significant exceptions in the data. The next section of this report (Part II) provides a broad overview of the entire Gulf Coast. Part III looks in more detail at each region. Part IV contains extensive tables with detailed information for each community. Throughout this report, the footnotes at the bottom of the pages refer to the tables in Part IV with more detailed information.
    • Harry Potter and the Cursed Child Celebration

      Widdicombe, Toby; Emmerichs, Sharon; Stone, Jennifer (University of Alaska Anchorage. Bookstore, 2016-08-12)
      Dramatic reading of Harry Potter and the Cursed Child with UAA English faculty: Toby Widdicombe, Sharon Emmerichs, Jennifer Stone, and others.
    • Hatcher Pass Ski Resort, Phase 1: Economic Significance

      Goldsmith, Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 1998)
      Hatcher Pass Ski Resort, Phase 1: Economic Significance