• Sex Offender Treatment Program: Preliminary Description

      Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1995-05-10)
      This report provides a summary of the history of sex offender treatment in Alaska, including the current status of treatment programs offered by the Alaska Department of Corrections, a review of literature on sex offender treatment and recidivism issues, and a summary of the descriptive characteristics of individuals who came in contact with the Hiland Mountain Correctional Center from January 1987 to March 1993.
    • Sex Offender Treatment Project: Literature Review

      Barnes, Allan R.; Baca, Melanie; Dix, Melody; Flahr, Shelly; Gaal, Cathy; Whitaker, Max; Moeglein, Samantha; Morgheim, Nicol (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 1994-07-22)
      A comprehensive literature review on recidivism by and the treatment of sex offenders.
    • Sexual Assault Case Processing: A Descriptive Model of Attrition and Decision Making

      Snodgrass, G. Matthew (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2006-05)
      The outcomes of sexual assaults involving one suspect and one victim reported to the Anchorage Police Department (APD) in 2000 to 2003 were examined. Overall, 1,235 sexual assaults were reported to APD during this period, of which 1,074 involved one suspect and one victim. Data were collected on 1,052 of these cases to learn how the Alaska Department of Law disposed of these cases. Of the 1,052 cases examined, 188 (17.9%) were referred to the Department of Law, 127 were accepted for prosecution, and 111 resulted in a conviction. Clearly, the point of greatest attrition is from report to referral, with 85.2 percent of reported sexual assaults not being referred for prosecution. However, most offenders whose cases reach prosecutors are held accountable in some degree through the imposition of criminal sanctions.
    • Sexual Assault Case Processing: A Descriptive Model of Attrition and Decision Making

      Snodgrass, G. Matthew (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2006-05)
      The outcomes of sexual assaults involving one suspect and one victim reported to the Anchorage Police Department (APD) in 2000 to 2003 were examined. Overall, 1,235 sexual assaults were reported to APD during this period, of which 1,074 involved one suspect and one victim. Data were collected on 1,052 of these cases to learn how the Alaska Department of Law disposed of these cases. Of the 1,052 cases examined, 188 (17.9%) were referred to the Department of Law, 127 were accepted for prosecution, and 111 resulted in a conviction. Clearly, the point of greatest attrition is from report to referral, with 85.2 percent of reported sexual assaults not being referred for prosecution. However, most offenders whose cases reach prosecutors are held accountable in some degree through the imposition of criminal sanctions.
    • Sexual Assault Case Processing: A Descriptive Model of Attrition and Decision Making

      Snodgrass, G. Matthew (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2009-03)
      This study examined the outcomes of sexual assault cases reported to the Anchorage Police Department between January 2000 and December 2003. The data include 1,052 cases involving one suspect and one victim (85% of all reported sexual assaults). Cases and charges were tracked through the Alaska Department of Law to determine what was referred, accepted, and convicted. * Overall, 18% of cases were referred for prosecution. The most common referred charge was a sexual assault in the first degree. Seventy-nine percent of referred charges were sexual assault charges. * Overall, 12% of cases were accepted for prosecution. The greatest point of attrition was from report to referral. Once referred, 68% of cases were accepted for prosecution. Sixty-eight percent of charges were accepted by the Department of Law as referred. The most common reasons for not accepting a charge as referred were evidentiary reasons. The most common accepted charge was also a sexual assault in the first degree. Seventy-five percent of accepted charges were sexual assault charges. * Overall, 11% of cases resulted in a conviction. Once accepted, 87% of cases resulted in a conviction. Although convictions were common in accepted cases, accepted charges were often dismissed. While 87% of accepted cases resulted in a conviction, 59% of accepted charges were dismissed. Ninety percent of guilty findings were a result of plea bargaining. With plea bargaining, some charges were dismissed but a conviction was still secured. Fifty-six percent of convicted charges were sexual assault charges. The most common convicted charge was for assault, followed by sexual assault in the second degree.
    • Sexual Assault in Alaska

      Rosay, André B. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2009-08-03)
      This Powerpoint slide presentation provides an overview of key results from Justice Center research on sexual assault in Alaska through August 2009, with discussion of victimization and its costs, victim characteristics, suspect characteristics, victim-suspect relationships, alcohol use, and criminal case processing (referral, prosecution, and disposition), and recidivism.
    • Sexual Assault Kit Initiative: Alaska Making Progress

      Cravez, Pamela (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-04-02)
      Victim-centered policies being developed by the Alaska Department of Public Safety for processing unsubmitted and untested sexual assault kits collected by Alaska State Troopers are one part of the state’s efforts to tackle more than 3,000 untested kits under grants from the Sexual Assault Kit Initiative of the Bureau of Justice Assistance, U.S. Department of Justice.
    • Sexual Assault Study: Differences by Age of Victim

      Morris, Catherine; Rosay, André B. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2004-04)
      This issue of Anchorage Community Indicators Series 2, "Sexual Assault Study," describes the spatial patterning and geographical concentration of 541 sexual assaults reported to the Anchorage Police Department in 2000–2001 by age of victim. Analysis compares the 210 victims that were less than 21 years old to the 339 victims that were 21 years old or older. Most suspects were older than their victims. On average, suspects were 5 years older than victims.
    • Sexual Assault Study: Differences by Community Council

      Rosay, André B.; Langworthy, Robert H. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2004-04)
      This issue of Anchorage Community Indicators Series 2, "Sexual Assault Study," describes the spatial patterning and geographical concentration of sexual assaults reported to the Anchorage Police Department in 2000–2001 by the five community councils with the highest incidence of sexual assauults reported to police during the study period: Downtown, Fairview, Mountain View, Northeast, and Spenard. Comparison date is presented for these five community councils on victim and suspect characteristics including age, race, and alcohol use; assault characteristics including day of week and location of assault; and victim-suspect relationship.
    • Sexual Assault Study: Differences by Day of Week

      Fleming, Alexa; Rosay, André B. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2004-04)
      This issue of Anchorage Community Indicators Series 2, "Sexual Assault Study," describes the spatial patterning and geographical concentration of 541 sexual assaults reported to the Anchorage Police Department in 2000–2001 by day of the week. More specifically, this analysis compares the 237 assaults that occurred during the week to the 264 assaults that occurred during the weekend. Most assaults (60%) occurred between 10 PM and 6 AM.
    • Sexual Assault Study: Differences by Relationship

      Matthews, Amanda; Rosay, André B. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2004-04)
      This issue of Anchorage Community Indicators Series 2, "Sexual Assault Study," describes the spatial patterning and geographical concentration of 282 sexual assaults reported to the Anchorage Police Department in 2000–2001 by relationship between victim and suspect. More specifically, this analysis compares the 168 victims assaulted by nonstrangers to the 99 victims assaulted by strangers. Among non-strangers, the most common relationships included acquaintances (30%), friends (27%), and boyfriends/girlfriends (12%).
    • Sexual Assault Study: Differences by Season

      Valentine, Jeff; Rosay, André B. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2004-04)
      This issue of Anchorage Community Indicators Series 2, "Sexual Assault Study," describes the spatial patterning and geographical concentration of 541 sexual assaults reported to the Anchorage Police Department in 2000–2001 by season of year: fall (Sep., Oct., Nov.), winter (Dec., Jan., Feb.), spring (Mar., Apr., May), and summer (Jun., Jul., Aug.).
    • Sexual Assault Study: Differences by Victim's Alcohol Use

      Snodgrass, G. Matthew; Rosay, André B. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2004-04)
      This issue of Anchorage Community Indicators Series 2, "Sexual Assault Study," describes the spatial patterning and geographical concentration of 282 sexual assaults reported to the Anchorage Police Department in 2001 by victim's alcohol use.
    • Sexual Assault Study: Differences by Victim's Race

      Altaffer, Kamaree; Rosay, André B. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2004-04)
      This issue of Anchorage Community Indicators Series 2, "Sexual Assault Study," describes the spatial patterning and geographical concentration of 541 sexual assaults reported to the Anchorage Police Department in 2000–2001 by victim's race. More specifically, this analysis compares the 257 Caucasian victims to the 243 Native victims. White and Native victims represented 90% of all victims.
    • Sexual Assault Study: Overview

      Rosay, André B.; Langworthy, Robert H. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2004-04)
      Anchorage Community Indicators is a public education project of the Justice Center aimed at providing information about various aspects of the Anchorage municipality through maps and tables. This issue introduces Series 2, "Sexual Assault Study," which describes the spatial patterning and geographical concentration of sexual assaults reported to the Anchorage Police Department in 2000–2001.
    • Sexual Assaults in Anchorage

      UAA Justice Center (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2009-03)
      This study examined the characteristics of all sexual assaults reported to the Anchorage Police Department from 2000 through 2003. Key descriptive findings are summarized. * Victims tended to be young and female, with Native women victims in over 45% of reported sexual assaults. * In a majority of the assaults – over 62% – the assailant was not a stranger to the victim. The most common non-stranger relationships included friends and acquaintances. * A majority of the assaults occurred indoors, with 45% taking place at the residence of one or both of those involved. * Sixty-five percent of victims had used alcohol prior to the assault and 74% of suspects had also. * While assaults occurred all over the Municipality of Anchorage, they happened with more frequency in Spenard, Fairview, and Downtown.
    • Sexual Assaults Reported to Alaska State Troopers

      Rosay, André B.; Postle, Greg; Wood, Darryl S.; TePas, Katherine (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2009-02)
      This study examined 989 cases with a sexual assault or sexual abuse of a minor charge reported to Alaska State Troopers in 2003 and 2004, and excluded any sexual assault cases reported to local or municipal departments. * Forty-eight percent of reports came from C Detachment (Western Alaska - Kodiak to Kotzebue), and 58% were reported from communities off the road system. * In 69% of cases, the identity of at least one suspect was known. While most suspects (87%) were adults, most victims (73%) were juveniles. Sixty-one percent of victims were Alaska Native and 38% were White. Intra-racial victimizations were much more prevalent than inter-racial victimizations. The most common suspect was a friend or acquaintance of the victim, followed by a relative. Forty-three percent of suspects and 27% of victims had used alcohol. * Sexual penetration occurred in 60% of assaults. Weapons were very rarely used. Most assaults occurred inside private residences. Nineteen percent of victims experienced general physical pain and 10% suffered bruising or swelling. Most victimizations were reported quickly to Troopers and Troopers were quick to respond. Ninety-six percent of victims were interviewed, with 48% interviewed on the day of the report and 80% interviewed within one week of the report. * Forty-six per cent of reported cases were referred for prosecution, 60% of referred cases were accepted for prosecution, and 80% of accepted cases resulted in a conviction. Overall, however, only 22% of reported cases resulted in a conviction. In some cases, the conviction may be for a non-sexual offense. The highest level of attrition occurred from report to referral.
    • Sexual Misconduct and Sexual Assault Committed against University of Alaska Students

      Blumenstein, Lindsey; Myrstol, Brad A. (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-06-01)
      This fact sheet presents past year estimates of sexual misconduct and sexual assault victimization against University of Alaska (UA) students. The estimates are based on 1,982 survey responses to the University of Alaska Campus Climate Survey, an online survey that collected data from a random sample of undergraduate and graduate students who were enrolled at UA during spring semester 2016.
    • Sexual Violence Committed against University of Alaska Students, by Gender

      Blumenstein, Lindsey; Myrstol, Brad A. (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-10-12)
      This fact sheet presents past year estimates of sexual misconduct and sexual assault victimization against University of Alaska (UA) students both on and off campus. Women- and men-specific estimates are provided for the UA system as a whole only. The results presented here are based on the survey responses of a randomly selected sample of 1,982 undergraduate and graduate students who were enrolled at any of the three UA major administrative units (MAUs) — UA Anchorage (UAA), UA Fairbanks (UAF), or UA Southeast (UAS) during spring semester 2016. This survey was modeled on the Campus Climate Survey Recommendations prepared by the White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault.
    • Sexual Violence in Alaska

      Rosay, André B. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2009-06-01)
      This Powerpoint presentation presents an overview of key results from Justice Center research on violence against women in Alaska through June 2009, with a particular focus on sexual assault, including victim characteristics, suspect characteristics, victim-suspect relationships, alcohol use, and criminal case processing (referral, prosecution, and disposition).