• How Hard Is It for Alaska’s Medicare Patients to Find Family Doctors?

      Frazier, Rosyland; Foster, Mark A. (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2009-03)
      In the past few years, Alaskans have been hearing reports that some primary-care doctors won’t see new Medicare patients. Medicare pays these doctors only about two-thirds of what private insurance pays—and that’s after a sizable increase in 2009. But most Americans 65 or older have to use Medicare as their main insurance, even if they also have private insurance. Just how widespread is the problem of Alaska’s primary-care doctors turning away Medicare patients? ISER surveyed hundreds of doctors to find out—and learned that so far there’s a major problem in Anchorage, a noticeable problem in the Mat-Su Borough and Fairbanks, and almost no problem in other areas.
    • How Has the 80th Percentile Rule Affected Alaska's Health-Care Expenditures?

      Guettabi, Mouhcine (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-05-16)
      We use the Health Expenditures by State of Residence data (1991-2014) compiled by Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services to examine the causal effect of the 80th percentile rule on Alaska's health care expenditures. We find evidence that Alaska's expenditures would have been lower in the absence of rule. The share of the overall increase in expenditures that we attribute to the 80th percentile rule is between 8.61% and 24.65%. It is important to note that using expenditures as a proxy for costs has limitations as it is the product of both quantity of services used and prices.
    • How Has the 80th Percentile Rule Affected Alaska's Health-Care Expenditures?

      Guettabi, Mouhcine (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 5/16/2018)
      We use the Health Expenditures by State of Residence data (1991-2014) compiled by Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services to examine the causal effect of the 80th percentile rule on Alaska's health care expenditures. We find evidence that Alaska's expenditures would have been lower in the absence of rule. The share of the overall increase in expenditures that we attribute to the 80th percentile rule is between 8.61% and 24.65%. It is important to note that using expenditures as a proxy for costs has limitations as it is the product of both quantity of services used and prices.
    • How Is the State Dealing With the Shortfall in Pension Systems?

      Groh, Cliff (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-04-18)
      I n early 2003, financial analysts gave Alaska state officials some very bad news: the two largest pension systems for public employees wouldn’t have the money to cover all the expected future costs of pensions and health-care benefits for state and local employees when they retired. This shortfall—called the unfunded liability— had been caused by, among other things, several years of poor returns on fund investments and soaring health-care costs. Public pensions are protected in Alaska’s constitution, and the state has already contributed nearly $7 billion to reduce the shortfall. How much more it will need to pay is uncertain, since it depends on many things that are hard to predict. But most analysts believe it will be billions more. That poses a major challenge for the state—which has been dealing with big budget deficits—and for local governments, which need to help pay the unfunded liability but have far smaller financial reserves than the state.
    • How Much Might Climate Change Add to Future Costs for Public Infrastructure?

      Goldsmith, Scott; Larsen, Peter; Smith, Orson; Wilson, Meghan; Strzepek, Ken; Chinowsky, Paul; Saylor, Ben; Leask, Linda; Merill, Clemencia (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2007)
      Scientists expect Alaska’s climate to get warmer in the coming years— and the changing climate could make it roughly 10% to 20% more expensive to build and maintain public infrastructure in Alaska between now and 2030 and 10% more expensive between now and 2080. These are the first estimates of how much climate change might add to future costs for public infrastructure in Alaska, and they are preliminary.
    • How Much Different Are Costs Amongst Alaska School Districts?

      Tuck, Bradford; Berman, Matthew; Hill, Alexandra (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2005)
      The big differences among Alaska’s school districts—in remoteness, climate, community amenities, and energy sources—also mean big differences in school operating costs. ISER’s new estimates of the geographic cost differences among Alaska’s 53 districts range from 7 percent to more than 100 percent above costs in Anchorage. The existing differentials are set in state law and have been used since 1998; the legislature will decide whether to adopt any changes. Keep in mind that the differentials are just one factor in a complex formula used to determine aid for individual districts. That formula begins with a base amount per student, for students in all districts, that the legislature sets each year. The proposed differentials are higher than the existing ones, which range from 1 to 70 percent above Anchorage’s costs. This summary is based on a more detailed report, Alaska School District Cost Study Update, by Bradford Tuck, Matthew Berman, and Alexandra Hill.
    • How much does Alaska spend on K-12 education?

      Defeo, Dayna; Berman, Matthew; Hill, Alexandra; Hirshberg, Diane (Center for Alaska Education Policy Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 9/30/2019)
      Education funding in Alaska, as in most states, is one of the largest allocations in the state operating budget. In 2017, Alaska�s K-12 per-pupil spending was $17,838, which is 46% higher than the national average. However, a lot of things in Alaska are expensive relative to national averages: healthcare, food, and energy, to name just a few. In this paper we adjusted Alaska�s data from the US Census Bureau 2017 Annual Survey of School System Finances to state and national cost indices, and find that Alaska�s per-pupil expenditures are on par with national averages. As many drivers of Alaska�s education costs extend beyond education policy, we caution against cuts that leave districts with few choices but to diminish the teacher workforce by eliminating positions or hiring lower quality teachers with less competitive salaries.
    • How Much Should Alaska Save?

      Goldsmith, Oliver Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2011-02)
      Alaska today is in the lucky position of having an estimated $126 billion in petroleum wealth— $45 billion in savings accounts derived from oil revenues, and $81 billion in future state revenues from oil and gas still in the ground--if current official state projections prove accurate. Almost all state revenues come from oil, as they have for 30 years. But oil production is now only a third of what it once was, and analysts think that even with new discoveries and enhanced recovery, production from state lands will keep dropping. So Alaskans face a dilemma: how can we preserve this petroleum wealth for future generations, while still benefitting from it ourselves? The answer is to limit how much we spend today from our petroleum wealth, and invest the savings in income generating assets. The income from those assets would grow over time and gradually replace declining petroleum revenues. We’ve already taken a major step, by depositing 24% of past oil revenues into savings accounts. Is that enough?
    • How North Slope Oil Has Transformed Alaska's Economy (Presentations)

      Goldsmith, Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2008)
      This presentation was delivered to the 4th Annual Oil and Gas Symposium in Anchorage, Alaska. It provides charts and graphical information on the contribution of North Slope oil to the national and state economy.
    • How Oil Prices Affect the Fiscal Gap

      Goldsmith, Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 1990)
      In this short summary based on ISER's Fiscal Policy Papers series, we estimate the timing and size of the state fiscal gap at the currently proposed $2.5 billion level of spending and at various oil prices. Findings are presented in figures and summarized.
    • How Petroleum Has Transformed the Alaska Economy

      Goldsmith, Oliver Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2010-05-13)
    • How to become a White House Fellow

      Blazek, Matt (University of Alaska Anchorage. Bookstore, 2013-04-02)
      A presentation on April 2, 2013 at the University of Alaska Anchorage's Bookstore. How to become a White House Fellow. Matt Blazek is a program analyst for the National Ocean Policy in the Alaska Region of the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) and a Presidential Management Fellow. At this event, he will explain how to become a White House Fellow, share first-hand knowledge of the program, offer details about the application process, and discuss the opportunities and avenues for UAA students and recent graduates seeking part-time or full-time employment within the federal government.
    • How to Make Friends and Influence Students

      Burgert, Lisa; Nann, Alejandra; Sterling, Lorelei (California Academic & Research Libraries, 2014-04)
      Given the widespread adoption of social media on the University of San Diego’s (USD) campus, Copley Library formed a Social Media Committee to manage the library’s social media presence with a mission to promote the library’s services and events. To determine which social media platforms undergraduates were using the committee designed and administered a survey in the fall of 2013. The survey confirmed that USD undergraduates were still using Facebook and showed 56% use multiple social media sites. The conference session discussed Copley Library’s implementation of four social networking platforms: Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest, and Twitter.
    • How to Prolong the Career Life of a Practicing Physician: Assessing the Causes and Extent of Physician Burnout in a Primary Care Setting

      Tsigonis, Jean M. W. (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-05-01)
      Physicians report widespread burnout and job dissatisfaction. Institutional and personal changes are necessary for meaningful work and restoration of the joy of the practice of medicine. This practicum project conducted a survey to assess the causes and extent of physician burnout at Tanana Valley Clinic (TVC). The Areas of Worklife Survey-Maslach Burnout Inventory (AWS-MBI) was used to gather data on the causes and extent of physician burnout. Analysis of the AWS-MBI survey data produced by Mind Garden was done by the principal investigator. The Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) assesses the extent of physician burnout. The Areas of Worklife Survey (AWS) reveals causes of burnout and enables directed interventions to help decrease the physician burnout. The data indicate that burnout does exist in two of the three areas of burnout assessed: emotional exhaustion and depersonalization. Specific areas in the worklife were identified that cause burnout: workload, control, fairness and value. Suggestion for future direction includes interventions, analysis of those interventions, and an evaluation plan.
    • How Vulnerable Is Alaska's Economy to Reduced Federal Spending?

      Goldsmith, Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2008)
      About a third of all jobs in Alaska can be traced to federal spending here—and over the past decade the rapid increase in federal spending drove much of the economic growth. Federal spending in Alaska more than doubled between 1995 and 2005, and in 2006 it was $9.25 billion. But now federal spending here has stopped growing, and many Alaskans are worried that the economy is vulnerable to spending cuts as the federal budget tightens. This analysis estimates that Alaska could be vulnerable to federal spending cuts in the range of $450 million to $1.25 billion—which could cost the economy anywhere from about 7,000 to 20,000 jobs in the future. We estimate potential vulnerability as a range, because it’s impossible to predict with any precision how federal spending will actually change. The best we can do is estimate the likely magnitude of reductions, given federal budget problems.
    • How Would a Road Affect Cordova?

      Kruse, Jack (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 1995)
      The proposed road to Cordova has created controversy for more than 30 years. Several time work has been started and stopped on what is known as the Copper River Highway. In 1992 the Alaska Department of Transportation and Public Facilities hired ISER to study the potential economic and social effects of a road to Cordova. ISER's report provided information for a draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) on the road. That EIS was not released at the time of publication, however, the four volumes of the ISER report were released in 1993. Major findings of the report are outlined in this summary research report.
    • How Would$1,200 Per Person State Payments Compare With Increased Household Costs for Energy Use?

      Colt, Steve; Saylor, Ben (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2008-07-11)
      In the face of sharply rising energy costs, Alaska’s governor, Sarah Palin, has proposed to pay every Alaskan $1,200 to help cover those increased costs. The Alaska Legislature will be considering the governor’s proposal in the special session that began July 9. How would the proposed payments—about $3,300 for the average-size Alaska household—compare with recent increases in energy costs? We looked at that question and present our estimates here. But these truly are estimates, because there’s not much current information about the types and amounts of energy Alaska households use.
    • Human Dimensions of the Arctic System: Interdisciplinary Approaches to the Dynamics of Social Environment Relationships

      Huntington, Henry; Berman, Matthew; Cooper, Lee W.; Hamilton, Larry; Hinzman, Larry; Kielland, Knut; Kirk, Elizabeth; Kruse, Jack; Lynch, Amanda; McGuire, A. David; et al. (National Science Foundation, 200)
      In 1997 the National Science Foundation Arctic System Science (ARCSS) program launched the Human Dimensions of the Arctic System (HARC) initiative. Its goal is to “understand the dynamics of linkages between human populations and the biological and physical environment of the Arctic, at scales ranging from local to global.” ....This section describes several HARC projects to give an idea of the scope of the initiative and the breadth of inquiry that has so far been undertaken.
    • Human Health Impacts of and Public Health Responses to Climate Change

      Ebi, Kristie L. (University of Alaska Anchorage. Bookstore, 2009-02-03)
      Dr. Kristie L. Ebi is an independent consultant (ESS, LLC) who has been conducting research on the impacts of and adaptation to climate change for more than a decade. Dr. Ebi has worked with WHO, UNDP, USAID, and others on implementing adaptation measures and adaptation assessments and has edited four books on aspects of climate change and has published more than 80 papers.
    • Human Resources, Training and Education: A Survey of Alaska Criminal Justice Agencies

      Ring, Peter Smith (Criminal Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1976-09)
      This report presents results of a survey of Alaska criminal justice agencies. The survey was designed to provide baseline data on the educational levels of criminal justice personnel and existing training programs in Alaska; and to elicit from criminal justice agencies their views on subject areas — both in higher education programs and in continuing professional development programs — which those agencies believed deserved attention. A total of 47 agencies, offices, institutions within agencies, and individuals responded to the survey, out of a total of 78 to whom surveys were sent. Respondents represented the law enforcement agencies, the Alaska Court System, the Alaska Department of Law, the Alaska Public Defender, and correctional agencies including probation/parole.