• Implementing SBIRT in Primary Care: A Study of Three Mat-Su Borough Health Care Practices

      Passini, Jessica; Elkins, Amanda; King, Diane; Frazier, Rosyland (Center for Behavioral Health Research and Services, 2018)
      Despite decades of research evidence that SBIRT is effective for addressing unhealthy patterns of drinking and reducing binge drinking, its adoption within healthcare practices continues to be slow. Providers have identified numerous reasons for not routinely screening and intervening on alcohol, including limited time, training, and resources for patients requiring treatment; lack of confidence in their ability to help patients reduce their drinking; inadequate reimbursement for SBIRT services, and worry about stigmatizing patients.
    • Implications of Oil Supply Uncertainty on a Small Oil-Producing Regional Economy

      Goldsmith, Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 1994)
      The state of Alaska has an economic and fiscal structure that is unique among the states. The petroleum industry, including exploration and development, production, transportation, and refining, accounts for nearly half of gross state product (the state equivalent of gross domestic product). In theory it is a simple matter to devise a rule that has the dual effects of neutralizing cycles in economic activity associated with the life cycle of petroleum exploitation and maximizing the benefits to residents from the expenditure of the petroleum wealth. Of the many complicating factors that make it difficult to devise and apply such a rule is the uncertainty regarding the size of the endowment, which is also one of the most interesting. How much it is appropriate to spend today depends directly on the size of the endowment not yet collected. This paper reviews a model for answering the public policy question of when to spend, with a special focus on how uncertainty complicates the debate. It also looks at the process of developing a plan for implementing the model within the context of the Alaska political and fiscal structure. Presented at the Second OPEC/Alaska Energy Conference in Anchorage, Alaska on May 7, 1994.
    • Improving Emergency Airway Care at a Critical Access Hospital

      Mitchell, Kelly (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2020-12-01)
      Emergency airway care is of the highest priority in caring for patients arriving at the emergency department with critical injuries and conditions. Intubation via laryngoscopy is the gold standard for placing an endotracheal tube to manage ventilation. In rural areas, emergency airway care is often the responsibility of non-expert providers who rarely have the opportunity to perform this life-saving procedure. These less experienced providers often take a longer time and make more attempts at endotracheal intubation. Multiple attempts and increased time taken to secure an airway are associated with higher morbidity and mortality. A critical review of the literature supports that video laryngoscopy increases first pass endotracheal intubation success. Video laryngoscopy is associated with faster intubation times and an improved view of glottic structures. This evidence-based quality improvement project implemented training and simulation in the use of video laryngoscopy for non-expert providers. After implementation of this quality improvement project, findings demonstrated an improved confidence with use of video laryngoscopy, increased confidence that video laryngoscopy is associated with improved visualization of glottic area and increased confidence associated with first pass of the endotracheal tube in non-expert providers using laryngoscopy to perform endotracheal intubation.
    • Improving Health Care Access for Older Alaskans: What Are the Options?

      Frazier, Rosyland; Foster, Mark A. (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2010-06)
      This report focuses on the problem older Alaskans who rely on Medicare face getting access to primary care, and discusses some of the options policymakers are considering to resolve the problem. But older Americans across the country also report difficulty getting the primary care they need. The discussion here sheds light on the problem and potential solutions nationwide. Most Americans 65 and older use Medicare as their primary health insurance. Medicare is federal health insurance for people 65 and older, people under 65 with certain disabilities, and people of any age with end-stage renal disease—but this report looks only at access issues for Medicare beneficiaries 65 and older. Doctors don’t have to participate in the Medicare program. But those who do participate have to accept, as full payment, what Medicare pays for specific services. Many primary-care doctors say Medicare doesn’t pay them enough to cover their costs—so growing numbers are declining to see new Medicare patients. Among primary-care doctors nationwide, 61% accept new Medicare patients.1 National surveys sponsored by the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission have found that 17% of Medicare patients in the U.S. had “a big problem” finding family doctors in 2007—up from 13% in 2005.2 In Alaska, a 2008 survey by the Institute of Social and Economic Research (ISER) found that just over half of Alaska’s primary-care doctors were willing to treat new Medicare patients.3 The situation was worse in Anchorage, where 40% of all older Alaskans live. Only 17% of primary-care doctors in Anchorage were willing to treat new Medicare patients as of 2008 (Figure 1).4
    • Improving Teledermatology Utilization in an Alaskan Health Care System

      Rowen, Mary Anne (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2019-05-01)
      The consistent demand for dermatology services, within an Alaskan health care network, warrants an organized, collaborative approach to acquiring a higher capacity of teledermatology consultations. The lack of uniformity among providers for using telemedicine technology in dermatology can hinder cost-saving care. Understanding the obstacles and utilization practices surrounding teledermatology adoption is a crucial objective for a project conducted in an integrated health care system. Devising a protocol with supporting education may reinforce expectations for primary care providers and community health aides and practitioners to be consistent with the utilization of dermatology consultations. A Teledermatology Utilization Project was conducted in an Alaska urban facility to affect change throughout an integrated system. Results indicated a significant increase in teledermatology cases since implementing a protocol and supportive education.
    • In Memoriam [Nancy E. Schafer]

      UAA Justice Center (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2014-02-19)
      Dr. Nancy E. Schafer, a member of the Justice Center faculty from 1983 to 2002, died in September 2013 after an illness. Research publications and papers by Dr. Schafer can be viewed at the Justice Center website.
    • In the Shadow of Boone and Crockett

      Hartman, Ian C. (University of Alaska Anchorage. Bookstore, 2016-02-06)
      In his book In the Shadow of Boone and Crockett: Race, Culture, and the Politics of Representation in the Upland South, Ian Hartman explores American race theories concerning people of the upland South (southern Appalachia to the Ozarks.) While analyzing the southern stereotypes of there being a pure, superior "American race" with those portraying poor, debased, white "imbeciles," Ian Hartman describes how the eugenics movement "sought to regenerate and purify a once proud but now impoverished and degraded people through policies that included forced sterilization." Ian C. Hartman is an assistant professor of History at UAA. He completed his PhD at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
    • In-State Gas Demand Study

      Goldsmith, Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2010-01-01)
    • Increasing Food Safety Compliance With Online Resources

      Novak, Amber Cristina (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-05-01)
      Food-borne illness is a top concern for public policy and public health in the U.S., causing nearly 48 million incidents yearly. The number of confirmed food-borne illness outbreaks has declined over recent years as regulation and control measures of the Food and Drug Administration have increased. However, despite increased regulations and decreased outbreaks, there are still a large number of food safety violations, and it is imperative that food service employers continue to encourage good food safety practices. Mandated training has produced varying results on the improved inspection scores of restaurant establishments, but understanding the barriers to food safety and employing food safety intervention measures has had positive results on improving the employees’ food safety compliance behaviors. There is an opportunity to explore new interventions and mediums to increase safe food handling behaviors. This project describes the development of a food safety resource, FoodSafetyKmowledge.org. The site exists as a singular location for managers to find all of the necessary safety and sanitation resources in one accessible and convenient place. The discussion and analysis includes feedback from other food service professionals, and I offer recommendations to improve the site for future use.
    • Increasing Police Utility through Organizational Design

      Angell, John E. (Criminal Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1976-11)
      Research by social scientists over the past decade provides strong evidence that American policies concerning police organizational designs have served in many instances to restrict the social usefulness, or utility, of local police operations. Substantial changes in police organizational designs are unlikely to occur unless policymakers have relatively comprehensive and complete models. To satisfy policy officials, a model must be (1) easily understood by laypersons, (2) logically related to definitions of problems acceptable to policymakers, (3) sufficiently defined to provide guidelines for systemic, incremental changes, and (4) adequate to facilitate simple, but accurate, assessment of the impact of changes consistent with the model. This paper is in pursuit of such an alternative model for improving police utility.
    • Index to Volumes 1–10

      UAA Justice Center; Green, Melissa S. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1994-04-11)
      The Alaska Justice Forum began publication in May 1977 under funding from the Alaska Criminal Justice Planning Agency, Governor's Commission on the Administration of Justice. It was published by the Criminal Justice Center (now the Justice Center) of the University of Alaska Anchorage and was edited by Roger V. Endell, Peter S. Ring, and Paul L. Edscorn. Due to lack of funding it discontinued with the June 1979 issue (Volume 3, Number 6). The Justice Center and the Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit resumed publication of the Alaska Justice Forum under a different format in Spring 1987 (Volume 4, Number 1) with partial funding from the Bureau of Justice Statistics, U.S. Department of Justice. The Alaska Justice Forum is edited by Antonia Moras. This index includes all articles published in the Alaska Justice Forum from Volume 1, Number 1 (May 1977) through Volume 10, Number 4 (Winter 1994). It was compiled by Melissa S. Green.
    • Indigenous elder teachings on science, technology and other issues for the 21st Century

      Merculieff, Larry (University of Alaska Anchorage. Bookstore, 2011-04-19)
      This will be a fascinating look at how the contributions of indigenous knowledge and ways of thinking can benefit people today. Larry Merculieff was born and raised in a traditional upbringing on St. Paul Island. In 2003, Larry was instrumental in gaining both federal and state recognition of Alaska Native subsistence rights to harvest halibut throughout coastal Alaska. Recently he founded Seven Generations Consulting.
    • Indigenous Knowledge Systems and Cross-Cultural Research

      Barnhardt, Ray (2015-03-06)
      The initiatives outlined in this article are intended to advance our understanding of cultural processes as they occur in diverse community contexts, as well as contribute to the further conceptualization, critique, and development of indigenous knowledge systems in their own right. Just as those same initiatives have drawn from the experiences of indigenous peoples from around the world, the organizations and personnel associated with this article have played a lead role in developing the emerging theoretical and evidentiary underpinnings on which the associated research is based. The expansion of the knowledge base that is associated with the interaction between western science and indigenous knowledge systems will contribute to an emerging body of scholarly work regarding the critical role that local observations and indigenous knowledge can play in deepening our understanding of human and ecological processes, particularly in reference to the experiences of indigenous peoples. This article addresses issues of relevance to underserved populations in Alaska and other geographic regions inhabited by indigenous peoples. It provides a much-needed impetus toward organizing research and education support structures that contribute to the broadening of an infrastructure fostering the use of multiple knowledge systems and diverse approaches to research. The international scope of the initiatives described provides multiple benefits derived from the economies of scale associated with linking numerous small-scale populations, as well as increased applicability of outcomes associated with the extensive opportunities for cross-cultural comparison.
    • Indigenous Regulatory Advocacy in Canada’s Far North: Mobilizing the First Mile Connectivity Consortium

      Hudson, Heather E.; McMahon, Robert; Fabian, Lyle (Journal of Information Policy, 2014-05)
      Marginalized groups such as Indigenous communities and residents of remote and rural areas face daunting challenges as they attempt to influence regulatory decision-making. Can these under-resourced groups hope to have their voices heard in regulatory proceedings, in the face of well-funded corporate interests? Applying a participatory research method to regulatory hearings regarding telecommunications services in Canada’s far north, the authors argue that they can, and identify specific strategies and tactics that they can employ when doing so.
    • Indigenous social and economic adaptations in northern Alaska as measures of resilience

      Martin, Stephanie (Resilience Alliance, 2014-12-01)
      I explored one aspect of social-ecological change in the context of an Alaskan human-Rangifer system, with the goal of understanding household adaptive responses to perturbations when there are multiple forces of change at play. I focused on households as one element of social resilience. Resilience is in the context of transition theory, in which communities are continually in a process of change, and perturbations are key points in the transition process. This case study of Anaktuvuk Pass, Alaska, USA, contributes to the understanding of cultural continuity and household resilience in times of rapid change by using household survey data from 1978 to 2003 to understand how households adapted to changes in the cash economy that came with oil development at the same time as a crash in the caribou population and state-imposed limits on caribou harvests. The research illustrates that households are resilient in the way they capture opportunities and create a new system so that elements of the old remain while parts change.
    • The Influence of Water Volume and Temperature on Hand Washing Time and Thoroughness: A Study on Factors Relevant to the Design of a Rainwater Catchment System for Rural Alaska

      Viator, Melissa (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-12-01)
      There are positive associations between respiratory and skin infections and the lack of in home piped water in rural Alaska, and such water-washed diseases are often attributable to insufficient water quantities for basic hygiene activities (e.g., hand washing, bathing, laundry services). Optimizing water sources could increase domestic household water availability, thus improving hygiene practices and reducing the risk of infection. Because household technologies designed to increase water availability can be extremely expensive to build, operate, and maintain in rural Alaska, it is important to understand minimum requirements for healthy water use practices (e.g., minimum heating and volume requirements). Thus, the study herein provides an assessment of the impact that washbasin water temperature and volume have on hand washing duration and thoroughness. In a controlled study of volunteer hand washers, it was found that while water temperature had no significant effect on hand washing time or thoroughness, water volume did have a positive association with both hand washing measures. The data suggest that attention and resources be focused on providing increased water quantities in the home, as opposed to heating water used for hand washing.
    • Informed Alaskans Initiative: Public Health Data in Alaska

      Armstrong, Barbara (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-04-01)
      This article describes the national and state public health data made available online through the Alaska Division of Public Health's Informed Alaskans Initiative.
    • Insights and Strategies for Confronting Violence: Conference Proceedings

      Johnson, Knowlton W.; Johnson, Knowlton W. (Justice Center, School of Justice, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1983-06)
      This volume collects 25 papers based on presentations at the 1982 Conference on Violence sponsored by the Justice Center at University of Alaska Anchorage, which was held October 11–13, 1982 in Anchorage. Part I, “Violent Behavior and Contributing Factors,” presents papers focusing on sexual abuse, police violence, and political violence. Additionally, firearms, alcohol, and the media are discussed as contributing factors to violence. Part II, “Control, Treatment and Prevention of Violence,” highlights traditional and alternative strategies for combating violence. In particular, research findings and models are presented that center on domestic violence, sexual abuse, violent juvenile and adult crime, crime against children, and the criminally insane. Part III, “Victims of Violence,” gives attention to traditional victim services as well as proposals for alternative programs for victims of violence. In addition, there is a discussion of people experiencing homelessness as victims of violence. Part IV, “Public Policy and Violence,” focuses on macrolevel issues of violence. The lead article presents a policy perspective in connection with violence in Northern Canada. Other issues addressed in the remaining articles are public policy and victims of violence, resource management and violence control, legal ramifications of censoring violence in the media, and use of research in combating violence.