• Sexual Assault Kit Initiative: Alaska Making Progress

      Cravez, Pamela (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-04-02)
      Victim-centered policies being developed by the Alaska Department of Public Safety for processing unsubmitted and untested sexual assault kits collected by Alaska State Troopers are one part of the state’s efforts to tackle more than 3,000 untested kits under grants from the Sexual Assault Kit Initiative of the Bureau of Justice Assistance, U.S. Department of Justice.
    • Sexual Assault Study: Differences by Age of Victim

      Morris, Catherine; Rosay, André B. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2004-04)
      This issue of Anchorage Community Indicators Series 2, "Sexual Assault Study," describes the spatial patterning and geographical concentration of 541 sexual assaults reported to the Anchorage Police Department in 2000–2001 by age of victim. Analysis compares the 210 victims that were less than 21 years old to the 339 victims that were 21 years old or older. Most suspects were older than their victims. On average, suspects were 5 years older than victims.
    • Sexual Assault Study: Differences by Community Council

      Rosay, André B.; Langworthy, Robert H. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2004-04)
      This issue of Anchorage Community Indicators Series 2, "Sexual Assault Study," describes the spatial patterning and geographical concentration of sexual assaults reported to the Anchorage Police Department in 2000–2001 by the five community councils with the highest incidence of sexual assauults reported to police during the study period: Downtown, Fairview, Mountain View, Northeast, and Spenard. Comparison date is presented for these five community councils on victim and suspect characteristics including age, race, and alcohol use; assault characteristics including day of week and location of assault; and victim-suspect relationship.
    • Sexual Assault Study: Differences by Day of Week

      Fleming, Alexa; Rosay, André B. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2004-04)
      This issue of Anchorage Community Indicators Series 2, "Sexual Assault Study," describes the spatial patterning and geographical concentration of 541 sexual assaults reported to the Anchorage Police Department in 2000–2001 by day of the week. More specifically, this analysis compares the 237 assaults that occurred during the week to the 264 assaults that occurred during the weekend. Most assaults (60%) occurred between 10 PM and 6 AM.
    • Sexual Assault Study: Differences by Relationship

      Matthews, Amanda; Rosay, André B. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2004-04)
      This issue of Anchorage Community Indicators Series 2, "Sexual Assault Study," describes the spatial patterning and geographical concentration of 282 sexual assaults reported to the Anchorage Police Department in 2000–2001 by relationship between victim and suspect. More specifically, this analysis compares the 168 victims assaulted by nonstrangers to the 99 victims assaulted by strangers. Among non-strangers, the most common relationships included acquaintances (30%), friends (27%), and boyfriends/girlfriends (12%).
    • Sexual Assault Study: Differences by Season

      Valentine, Jeff; Rosay, André B. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2004-04)
      This issue of Anchorage Community Indicators Series 2, "Sexual Assault Study," describes the spatial patterning and geographical concentration of 541 sexual assaults reported to the Anchorage Police Department in 2000–2001 by season of year: fall (Sep., Oct., Nov.), winter (Dec., Jan., Feb.), spring (Mar., Apr., May), and summer (Jun., Jul., Aug.).
    • Sexual Assault Study: Differences by Victim's Alcohol Use

      Snodgrass, G. Matthew; Rosay, André B. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2004-04)
      This issue of Anchorage Community Indicators Series 2, "Sexual Assault Study," describes the spatial patterning and geographical concentration of 282 sexual assaults reported to the Anchorage Police Department in 2001 by victim's alcohol use.
    • Sexual Assault Study: Differences by Victim's Race

      Altaffer, Kamaree; Rosay, André B. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2004-04)
      This issue of Anchorage Community Indicators Series 2, "Sexual Assault Study," describes the spatial patterning and geographical concentration of 541 sexual assaults reported to the Anchorage Police Department in 2000–2001 by victim's race. More specifically, this analysis compares the 257 Caucasian victims to the 243 Native victims. White and Native victims represented 90% of all victims.
    • Sexual Assault Study: Overview

      Rosay, André B.; Langworthy, Robert H. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2004-04)
      Anchorage Community Indicators is a public education project of the Justice Center aimed at providing information about various aspects of the Anchorage municipality through maps and tables. This issue introduces Series 2, "Sexual Assault Study," which describes the spatial patterning and geographical concentration of sexual assaults reported to the Anchorage Police Department in 2000–2001.
    • Sexual Assaults in Anchorage

      UAA Justice Center (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2009-03)
      This study examined the characteristics of all sexual assaults reported to the Anchorage Police Department from 2000 through 2003. Key descriptive findings are summarized. * Victims tended to be young and female, with Native women victims in over 45% of reported sexual assaults. * In a majority of the assaults – over 62% – the assailant was not a stranger to the victim. The most common non-stranger relationships included friends and acquaintances. * A majority of the assaults occurred indoors, with 45% taking place at the residence of one or both of those involved. * Sixty-five percent of victims had used alcohol prior to the assault and 74% of suspects had also. * While assaults occurred all over the Municipality of Anchorage, they happened with more frequency in Spenard, Fairview, and Downtown.
    • Sexual Assaults Reported to Alaska State Troopers

      Rosay, André B.; Postle, Greg; Wood, Darryl S.; TePas, Katherine (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2009-02)
      This study examined 989 cases with a sexual assault or sexual abuse of a minor charge reported to Alaska State Troopers in 2003 and 2004, and excluded any sexual assault cases reported to local or municipal departments. * Forty-eight percent of reports came from C Detachment (Western Alaska - Kodiak to Kotzebue), and 58% were reported from communities off the road system. * In 69% of cases, the identity of at least one suspect was known. While most suspects (87%) were adults, most victims (73%) were juveniles. Sixty-one percent of victims were Alaska Native and 38% were White. Intra-racial victimizations were much more prevalent than inter-racial victimizations. The most common suspect was a friend or acquaintance of the victim, followed by a relative. Forty-three percent of suspects and 27% of victims had used alcohol. * Sexual penetration occurred in 60% of assaults. Weapons were very rarely used. Most assaults occurred inside private residences. Nineteen percent of victims experienced general physical pain and 10% suffered bruising or swelling. Most victimizations were reported quickly to Troopers and Troopers were quick to respond. Ninety-six percent of victims were interviewed, with 48% interviewed on the day of the report and 80% interviewed within one week of the report. * Forty-six per cent of reported cases were referred for prosecution, 60% of referred cases were accepted for prosecution, and 80% of accepted cases resulted in a conviction. Overall, however, only 22% of reported cases resulted in a conviction. In some cases, the conviction may be for a non-sexual offense. The highest level of attrition occurred from report to referral.
    • Sexual Misconduct and Sexual Assault Committed against University of Alaska Students

      Blumenstein, Lindsey; Myrstol, Brad A. (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-06-01)
      This fact sheet presents past year estimates of sexual misconduct and sexual assault victimization against University of Alaska (UA) students. The estimates are based on 1,982 survey responses to the University of Alaska Campus Climate Survey, an online survey that collected data from a random sample of undergraduate and graduate students who were enrolled at UA during spring semester 2016.
    • Sexual Violence Committed against University of Alaska Students, by Gender

      Blumenstein, Lindsey; Myrstol, Brad A. (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-10-12)
      This fact sheet presents past year estimates of sexual misconduct and sexual assault victimization against University of Alaska (UA) students both on and off campus. Women- and men-specific estimates are provided for the UA system as a whole only. The results presented here are based on the survey responses of a randomly selected sample of 1,982 undergraduate and graduate students who were enrolled at any of the three UA major administrative units (MAUs) — UA Anchorage (UAA), UA Fairbanks (UAF), or UA Southeast (UAS) during spring semester 2016. This survey was modeled on the Campus Climate Survey Recommendations prepared by the White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault.
    • Sexual Violence in Alaska

      Rosay, André B. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2009-06-01)
      This Powerpoint presentation presents an overview of key results from Justice Center research on violence against women in Alaska through June 2009, with a particular focus on sexual assault, including victim characteristics, suspect characteristics, victim-suspect relationships, alcohol use, and criminal case processing (referral, prosecution, and disposition).
    • Shareholder Employment at Red Dog Mine

      Haley, Sharman; Fisher, David (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2012-04)
      Under the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act of 1971, Iñupiat of northwest Alaska organized as shareholders in the NANA1 Regional Corporation, Inc., and received title to 2,258,836 acres, including rights to the rich Red Dog zinc deposit. In 1982, NANA signed a joint-venture agreement with Teck2 to develop the mine, including provisions for preferential hire for qualified NANA shareholders. The agreement aimed for 100% shareholder hire by 2001. As of 2010, Teck had 220 NANA shareholders in full-time employment, which is 53 percent of the workforce. Other mines around the world have similar indigenous or local hire agreements with mixed success. The Voisey’s Bay mine sets the high mark for Canada with an Aboriginal hire rate of 54 percent (AETG 2008), followed by Ekati diamond mine at 50 percent (BHP Billiton 2011). So the track record for indigenous employment at Red Dog is high by global standards, although it falls short of NANA and Teck’s goal. What are the continuing barriers to increasing shareholder hire, retention and promotion?
    • Shifting Marijuana Laws and Policies: Implications for Alaska

      Brandeis, Jason (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2014-09-22)
      Marijuana regulation continues to be a pressing criminal justice and social policy issue both in Alaska and across the nation. A ballot measure that would legalize, tax, and regulate marijuana in Alaska will be before the state’s voters at the November 2014 general election. This article summarizes Alaska’s current marijuana laws (as of summer 2014), identifies recent changes to other state laws and federal policies related to marijuana use and possession, and discusses the impact of those changes on Alaska’s marijuana laws.
    • A short brief on the regional dimensions of the Alaska recession

      Guettabi, Mouhcine (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2/7/2018)
      We provide a short update on the Alaska recession by examining its regional dimensions. Specifically, we evaluate the performance of the Alaska boroughs/census areas in each of the last three years and determine which areas have been resilient and which ones continue losing jobs.
    • Short Papers Prepared for the Law Reform Commission While in Australia

      Conn, Stephen (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1980)
      These four brief papers were submitted for the consideration of the Law Review Commission of Australia (later the Australian Law Review Commission) in its inquiry about whether it would be desirable to apply, either in whole or in part, Aboriginal customary law to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. The author presents suggestions and information based on his research on traditional law ways among Alaska Native peoples and the relationship between indigenous law and the western law system in Alaska.
    • Short-Run Economic Impacts of Alaska Fiscal Options

      Knapp, Gunnar; Berman, Matthew; Guettabi, Mouhcine (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-03-30)
      Today Alaskans are talking about how to close the huge budget deficit the state government is facing, with the oil revenues it has depended on for decades now a small fraction of what they once were. Alaska has had budget deficits for several years, and it has made budget cuts—but it has mainly relied on billions of dollars in savings from the Constitutional Budget Reserve and other funds to cover the deficit. Those savings are dwindling, and the state needs to take measures to close the deficit. An important consideration is how various ways of reducing the deficit might affect Alaska’s economy. This study compares potential short-run economic effects of 11 options the state might take in the next few years to reduce the deficit and that are sustainable over the long term. We looked at economic effects of several types of spending cuts and taxes, as well as reducing the Permanent Fund dividend— the annual cash payment the state makes to all residents—and saving less of Permanent Fund earnings. We’re not advocating or opposing any option: our purpose is to estimate and compare the magnitude of the short-run economic effects of different ways of reducing the deficit. Broadly speaking: • Different ways of collecting money from Alaskans affect those with lower and higher incomes in significantly different ways. • Anything the state does to reduce the deficit will cost the economy jobs and money. But spending some of the Permanent Fund earnings the state currently saves would not have short-run economic effects. Saving less would, however, slow Permanent Fund growth and reduce future earnings. • Because the deficit is so big, the overall economic effects of closing the deficit will also be big.
    • Short-Run Economic Impacts of Alaska Fiscal Options

      Knapp, Funnar; Guettabi, Mouhcne; Berman, Matthew (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 3/1/2016)