• Kids Count Alaska 2005

      Hanna, Virgene; Lampman, Claudia (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2007)
      Over the past 15 years, Alaska’s children as a group have gotten older, more racially diverse, and more international. The total number of children in Alaska increased about 11% between 1990 and 2004, but the number of children ages 9 and younger dropped 8% and the number ages 10 to 18 rose 40%. During the same period, the number of children from minorities—the largest minority being Alaska Native—increased 75%, while the number from immigrant families was up nearly half. This year we show a snapshot of Alaska children in foster care. These are mostly children the state Office of Children’s Services (OCS) has taken, either temporarily or permanently, out of their parents’ homes—because the children were judged to be in “immediate” danger or their parents couldn’t be located. In some cases, parents voluntarily put their children into foster care, and in rare cases parents abandon children. The number of children in foster care varies throughout the year, as some children are returned to their parents’ custody and others come into the foster care system. Some are adopted and others age out of the system.
    • Kids Count Alaska 2006/2007

      Hanna, Virgene; Schreiner, Irma; DeRoche, Patricia; Lampman, Claudia (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2008-08)
      About This Year’s Book Every year the Kids Count Alaska data book reports on how the children of Alaska are doing. But we also like to tell readers a bit more about life in Alaska, to help them understand the place Alaska’s children call home. This year, we’re celebrating the wildlife that is so much a part of life in Alaska. Alaskans watch, hunt, photograph, and coexist with hundreds of large and small species of animals and birds. That coexistence is not always easy for either the wildlife or the people, but it is always interesting. An increasing number of tourists are also being drawn to Alaska for the opportunity to see wildlife that is either scarce or non-existent in other areas of the United States and the world. The whimsical wildlife illustrations on the cover and at the start of each indicator section are the work of Sebastian Amaya Garber, a talented young artist who grew up in Alaska but is now working toward a degree in industrial design at Western Washington University in Bellingham, Washington. The flip side of each illustration describes something about the specific animals and birds we’re profiling, which are: The sea otter, whose rich fur brought the Russians to Alaska • in the century before the United States bought Alaska The brown bear, one of the most respected and feared land • animals in North America The raven, which plays a big role in Alaska Native culture and • is one of the smartest, toughest birds anywhere The puffin, whose large, yellow-orange bill and orange feet • make it a stand-out in Alaska’s coastal waters The moose, which can weigh up to 1,500 pounds and is • often seen wandering neighborhoods and crossing streets in Alaska’s largest urban areas The humpback whale, whose dramatic breaches make it a • favorite of Alaskans and visitors along the southern coast of Alaska in the summertime Whahat is Kids Count Alaska? Kids Count Alaska is part of a nationwide program, sponsored by the Annie E. Casey Foundation, to collect and publicize information about children’s health, safety, and economic status. We pull together information from many sources and present it all in one place. We hope this book gives Alaskans a broad picture of how the state’s children are doing and provides parents, policymakers, and others interested in the welfare of children with information they need to improve life for children and families. Our goals are: Broadly distributing information about the status of Alaska’s • children Creating an informed public, motivated to help children• Comparing the status of children in Alaska with children • nationwide, and presenting additional Alaska indicators (including regional breakdowns) when possible Who Are Alaska’s Children? More than 206,000 children ages 18 or younger live in Alaska—just under a third of Alaska’s 2006 population of about 671,000. That’s an increase of about 15% in the number of children since 1990. During the past 15 years the age structure of Alaska children has also changed, with younger children making up a declining share and teenagers a growing share. In 1990, children ages 4 or younger made up 31% of all children; by 2006 that share had dropped to 26%. Among those 15 to 18, the 1990 share was about 16%, but it had risen to 22% by 2006. Boys outnumber girls in Alaska by close to 6%. There are more boys than girls in every age group. Even among infants, boys outnumbered girls by 8% in 2006. Alaska’s children have also grown more racially diverse in the past two decades, as illustrated by the figure showing Alaska’s school children by race. In 1988, 68% of school children were White and 32% were from minorities—primarily Alaska Natives.
    • Kids Count Alaska 2008

      Hanna, Virgene; Leask, Linda; Lampman, Claudia; Schreiner, Irma; DeRoche, Patricia (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2009-05)
      We’re pleased to announce that Kids Count Alaska is part of a new site, the Kids Count Data Center (datacenter.kidscount.org). Developed by the KIDS COUNT national program, the site gives easy access to data on children and teenagers for every state and hundreds of cities and counties across the country. For Alaska, you can select indicators for each of the state’s seven regions and create your own maps, trend lines, and charts. There are also maps and graphs you can put on your Web site or blog. You can go directly to that national site, or you can link from our Web site (www.kidscount.alaska.edu). We hope you’ll find the new data and features helpful. This book and all previous data books are available on our Web site, and each data book is divided into sections for faster downloading. Also on our site is a link to the most recent national KIDS COUNT data book, as well as to other publications and reports. About This Year’s Book Alaska is celebrating 50 years as a state in 2009—and as part of the celebration, we decided to illustrate this year’s data book with historic photos of Alaska’s children before statehood. We also used information from the U.S. Census Bureau to take a broad look at how conditions have changed for Alaska’s children since statehood. In the Highlights at the end of this section (pages 7 to 10) you’ll find some comparisons of the social and economic wellbeing of children in Alaska in 1959 and today. What is Kids Count Alaska? Kids Count Alaska is part of a nationwide program, sponsored by the Annie E. Casey Foundation, to collect and publicize information about children’s health, safety, and economic status. We pull together information from many sources and present it all in one place. We hope this book gives Alaskans a broad picture of how the state’s children are doing and provides parents, policymakers, and others interested in the welfare of children with information they need to improve life for children and families. Our goals are: • Distributing information about the status of Alaska’s children • Creating an informed public, motivated to help children • Comparing the status of children in Alaska with children nationwide, and presenting additional Alaska indicators (including regional breakdowns) when possible
    • Kids Count Alaska 2009-2010

      Hanna, Virgene; Schreiner, Irma; DeRoche, Patricia; Ikatova, Irena; Trimble, Erin (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2011-02)
      For information on children across America, visit the Kids Count Data Center (www.datacenter.kidscount.org). Developed by the national KIDS COUNT program, the site provides data on children and teenagers for every state and hundreds of cities and counties. For Alaska, you can select indicators for each of the state’s seven regions and create your own maps, trend lines, and charts. There are also maps and graphs you can put on your website or blog. You can go directly to that national site or link from our website (kidscount.alaska.edu). This book and all previous data books are available on our website, with each book divided into sections for faster downloading. Also on our site is a link to the most recent national KIDS COUNT data book, as well as other publications and reports.
    • Kids Count Alaska 2011-2012

      Hanna, Virgene; Ikatova, Irena; DeRoche, Patricia; Spiers, Kent; Silver, Darla; Sloth, Lily; Johnson, Erin; Leask, Linda; Amaya-Merrill, Clemencia (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2012-10)
      Kids Count Alaska is part of a nationwide program, sponsored by the Annie E. Casey Foundation, to collect and publicize information about children’s health, safety, education, and economic status. We gather information from many sources and present it in one place, trying to give Alaskans a broad picture of how the state’s children are doing and provide parents, policymakers, and others with information they need to improve life for children and families. Our goals are: • Distributing information about the status of Alaska’s children • Creating an informed public, motivated to help children • Comparing the status of children in Alaska with that of children nationwide, and presenting additional Alaska indicators (including regional breakdowns) when possible.
    • Kids Count Alaska 2013-2014

      Frazier, Rosyland; Wheeler, John; Spiers, Kent; Kirby, Daniel; Mielke, Meg (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-03-26)
      Kids Count Alaska is part of a nationwide program, sponsored by the Annie E. Casey Foundation, to collect and publicize information about children’s health, safety, education, and economic status. We gather information from many sources and present it in one place, to give Alaskans and others a broad picture of how well the state’s children are doing—and provide parents, policymakers, and others with information they need to improve life for children and families. Our goals are: • Distributing information about the status of Alaska’s children • Creating an informed public, motivated to help children • Comparing the status of children in Alaska with that of children nationwide, but also presenting additional indicators relevant for Alaska
    • Knowledge and Perception of Coronary Artery Disease in High-Risk Women

      Kottsick, Summer (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2014-11-17)
      Background: Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of death in America and kills more women each year than all other cancers combined. While women’s level of awareness of heart disease has increased, they often do not perceive their risk of heart disease accurately, nor do they understand the importance of adopting heart-healthy behaviors to reduce risk. Objective: By implementing a combination of counseling from a health care provider and computer-based tailored education, this project aimed to test the effectiveness of using the Go Red for Women™ Heart CheckUp as an educational intervention for high-risk women to increase the accurate perception of risk, improve CAD knowledge, and increase intent to make behavioral changes. Methods and Discussion: Twenty-one women with a history of CAD, myocardial infarction, percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty, or coronary artery bypass grafting completed the Go Red for Women™ Heart CheckUp tool and rated their perception of risk from CAD and belief that they could change their risk both before and after the tool. There was an increase in perception of risk and belief in change after the tool. Qualitative data showed participants were educated about CAD. Conclusion: The Go Red for Women™ Heart Check-up tool was shown to be useful in educating high-risk women about their cardiac risk and in promoting heart-healthy behaviors.
    • The Kodiak National Wildlife Refuge: Economic Importance

      Goldsmith, Scott; Brian, Jerry; Hill (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2003)
      In this regional economic assessment, we focus primarily on an economic significance analysis; we present a brief economic impact analysis as well. Both are useful for policy analysis, but each measures a different dimension of economic activity. The economic significance of a refuge is a measure of the total number of jobs and the total household income generated by expenditures associated with the management of each refuge, by expenditures of refuge visitors, and by expenditures for the harvest and other use of refuge resources. In Alaska these expenditures directly create jobs for Fish and Wildlife Service employees, for people employed in businesses serving the recreation industry, and for commercial fishermen. Additional jobs are created by expenditures of the Fish and Wildlife Service and by businesses for procuring supplies and services. As these government and private sector workers spend their incomes, jobs in other sectors of the economy are created through a process known as the multiplier effect. The total number of jobs created by expenditures for management and use of the refuge is consequently greater than just the number directly created. The purpose of this study is to develop a regional economic assessment of the Kodiak National Wildlife Refuge in southwestern Alaska. This assessment will be used to help update the Comprehensive Conservation Plan for the refuge, as required under section 304 of the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act (ANILCA).
    • Kodiak Population Projections

      Goldsmith, Scott; Hill, Alexandra (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 1997)
      The City of Kodiak asked the Institute of Social and Economic Research to generate population projections through 2020 for the city and the adjacent area (Service Area l) served by city sewer. The projections currently used in planning a new wastewater treatment facility extremely high to many knowledgeable observers. ISER reviewed the existing population projections and generated an independent set of projections based on our explicit analysis of the Kodiak economy and demography. In the projections for Kodiak Island Borough. tourism and seafood are the driving factors in explaining projected population growth. Other wage and salary and federal government categories also drive some growth, but are less important.
    • Kodiak: Characteristics of the Support Sector Economy

      Goldsmith, Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 1998)
      We compare the support sector of the Kodiak economy to other similarly sized markets in Alaska using employment and sales receipt information available from the state and federal governments. The employment analysis suggests that Kodiak may be underserved, particularly in certain service sectors. In contrast the sales receipt information suggests that the support sector of the Kodiak economy is comparable with similarly sized markets in Alaska. This analysis uses Central Place Theory to understand why the number and variety of businesses varies among communities. In this study we compare the trade and service activities in different Alaska communities using a variety of measures of both activity levels and market size.
    • Law Enforcement Selection Practices in the U.S.A. and Canada

      Johnson, Knowlton W. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1983-04)
      Selection practices in law enforcement have been said to be one of the most complex facets of personnel management. In an effort to document the state of this complexity internationally, the study presented provides state of the art information about police personnel practices in the USA and Canada.
    • Law Related Education Project: Final Report

      Balnave, Richard (Criminal Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1976-08-11)
      This report describes a cooperative project beween Anchorage School District (ASD) and the Criminal Justice Center at University of Alaska, Anchorage, to develop a law-related curriculum for 5th, 6th, 7th, and 8th-grade classrooms. The pilot program was implemented in March through June 1976 in 20 ASD classrooms with approximately 800 children. The curriculum used was the "Law in Action" series by Linda Riekes and Sally Mahe Ackerly (West Publishing Company, 1975), using the units on "Lawmaking" (5th grade), "Youth Attitudes and the Police" (6th grade), "Courts and Trials" (7th grade), and "Juvenile Problems and the Law" (8th grade). Feedback from the pilot program led to the writing of supplementary teacher's manuals for each of the four units, reflecting improvements to the original lessons, supplementary classroom activities, supplementary media, and inclusion of Alaska-specific content such as Alaska laws and community resources. Complete "classroom kits" were deposited in ASD's Instructional Materials Center for continued use by ASD teachers interested in providing legal and justice education to their students.
    • Lawmaking: Teacher's Manual

      Balnave, Richard; Anchorage School District (Anchorage School District; Criminal Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1976-08)
      In 1976, Anchorage School District (ASD) and the Criminal Justice Center at University of Alaska, Anchorage, collaborated to develop a law-related curriculum for 5th, 6th, 7th, and 8th-grade classrooms, with teacher's manuals written to supplement the basic texts chosen for the program, the "Law in Action" series by Linda Riekes and Sally Mahe Ackerly (West Publishing Company, 1975). This teacher's manual for the unit taught to fifth-graders, "Lawmaking," focuses on how our laws are made. The teacher's manual reflects improvements to the original lessons, supplementary classroom activities, supplementary media, and inclusion of Alaska-specific content such as information about the Alaska Legislature and other legal bodies in Alaska, the steps in the passage of a law in Alaska, and Alaska community resources. Supplementary material in this teacher's manual does not cover every lesson in the original "Law in Action" unit.
    • Learning Group Formation Factors in a Career and Technical Education Networking Program

      Plunkett, George R. (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2014-04)
      Team based learning based on the transformation of permanent student groups into powerful learning teams is widely and successfully used as an instructional strategy in postsecondary career and technical education. Failure of groups to reach the learning team status is a major learning drawback of this approach. Factors affecting the transformation of groups to teams are applied consistently to the whole class, with the exception of group formation and membership. Career and technical education populations differ from other postsecondary populations and examination of group formation factors may result in improvement of student results.
    • LED Traffic Signal Luminous Intensity Degradation: A Preliminary Data Analysis

      Quinonez, Michael Alejo (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2020-12-01)
      Light emitting diodes (LEDs) have replaced a high amount of incandescent lights in the past couple decades. LEDs, when they degrade keep bright even though they fall outside of the required specification values determined by the Institute of Traffic Engineers 2005 traffic signal specification. The purpose of this research study is to take measurements of various traffic signals in both Anchorage Alaska and Fairbanks Alaska to determine the rate of decay over their years of installment. This was done by visiting 34 intersections combined and using a spectroradiometer to measure for luminance which then converted to a luminous intensity value by applying the ITE guidelines of conversion. Results confirm what was expected that traffic signals show a trend as they do degrade at an increase the longer they are out on deployment. A hypothesis testing of means was one of the methods applied to prove this theory. LEDs do degrade over time, however it is important to find the trends so that department of transportations and engineers can make the safest and cost effective decision as to when to replace a LED traffic signal.
    • The Legacy of Verna E. Pratt.

      Hudson, Ginger (University of Alaska Anchorage. Bookstore, 2018-04-23)
      When Ginger Hudson purchased her first Field Guide to Alaskan Wildflowers in 1999, she had no idea she was destined meet the author, Verna Pratt-twelve years later. Today, Ginger is the newsletter editor for the Master Gardeners in Anchorage and secretary of the Native Plant Society. She is enrolled in the UAA MFA Creative Writing and Literary Arts Program to complete her forthcoming publication, The Life and Legacy of Verna Pratt, Alaska's Wildflower Wizard.
    • Legal Culture Blindness and Canadian Indian Law

      Conn, Stephen (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1989-04)
      This paper explores the special problems that specialists in federal Indian law in the United States face when they attempt to understand the legal position of indigenous peoples in Canada, make comparisons and offer assistance and advice. Although the roots of Canadian Indian law in British Crown policy are similar to those of the United States, the evolution of United States and Canadian Indian law occurred in patterns which were as distinctly different as has been the evolution of each country. Although some comparisons can be made between the two patterns of legal development, especially in the realm of policy changes directed at indigenous populations, the core of each legal relationship is very different, especially as it relates to federalism, the constitutional process and role of the courts, and public land issues. Therefore, while models of Indian legal achievements in one country are often used to induce governmental change in the other, especially in Alaska among the United States and in Canada, generally, advocates and United States specialists must exercise extreme caution to avoid legal culture blindness based on a lack of appreciation of the very different historical development of each nation.
    • Legal Education for a Frontier Society: A Survey of Alaskan Needs and Opportunities in Education, Research and the Delivery of Legal Services

      Havelock, John E. (University of Alaska, 1975)
      Alaska is the only state of the United States that does not have a law school. This 1975 study, commissioned by the Alaska Legislative Council and the University of Alaska, is the first comprehensive investigation of the demand for legal and law-related services in Alaska and how that demand can best be met, including an examination of the feasibility of establishing a law school in the state. The study describes contemporary methods of delivering legal services in the state, with particular focus on the needs of rural and middle income Alaskans, and evaluates their cost and efficiency. It evaluates the present supply of lawyers and law-trained people in Alaska with reference to national trends in legal education, the migration to and admission of attorneys in Alaska, and the unique circumstances of Alaska law practice. It analyzes the need and demand for legal education in the state, and incorporates principal results of surveys of the general public and of Anchorage-area attorneys. The study concludes that there is no need to increase the supply of lawyers in Alaska by establishment of a law school and that many objectives which might be reached by a law school can also be reached by building on existing arrangements and models and development of other options for legal practice in Alaska such as paralegal training, particularly in rural areas of the state.
    • Legal Representation and Custody Determinations

      Fortson, Ryan; Payne, Troy C. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2019-09-12)
      Do lawyers matter in case outcomes, and can this be shown empirically? A recently published study of initial custody disputes suggests that having an attorney can result in a more favorable outcome for the client, but only if the other side is not also represented by an attorney.