• Options For Restructuring Alaska Salmon Fisheries

      Knapp, Gunnar (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2003)
      The paper provides a very brief introduction to the very complicated topic of options for restructuring Alaska salmon fisheries. By "restructuring" we mean any change in the rules affecting how, where, when, and by whom, salmon are harvested in Alaska. The main goal of this paper is to show that there are many different ways to go about restructuring. the choices are not simply between broad options such as "permit stacking" or "buybacks" or "co-ops", but also - and critically - how those options are designed and implemented. Prepared for a panel discussion for the Alaska Legislature's Fish Caucus on "Restructuring the Salmon Industry: A discussion of Fishery Management Models".
    • The Origins of Ukraine and the Ukrainian-Russian Crisis

      Murphy, Curtis (University of Alaska Anchorage. Bookstore, 2014-04-15)
      At this timely event, historian Curtis Murphy (UAA History Dept.) shares his understanding of the critical developments in Ukraine and Russia today. His research on burghers and bureaucrats in Poland-Lithuania, 1776-1793 has been published in the Slavic Review and currently he is working on a book about the state and self-governing entities in Poland, Ukraine, and Russia from 1750 to 1850.
    • Our Perfect Wild

      Bane, Ray; Johnson-Sullivan, Kaylene (University of Alaska Anchorage. Bookstore, 2015-12-03)
      Kaylene Johnson-Sullivan discusses her book Our Perfect Wild: Ray and Barbara Bane's Journeys and the Fate Of the Far North, recently published by University of Alaska Press. Joining Kaylene, via Skype, will be Ray Bane who now resides in Hawaii. Our Perfect Wild examines the life of Ray and Barbara Bane, who in the 1960s worked as teachers in Barrow and Wainwright, Alaska. A decade later, Ray's dedication to the Alaska Native subsistence lifestyle led him to work for the National Park Service as a park planner for Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve and many other national parks in Alaska.
    • Outpatient education and medication adherence

      Sherwood, Veronica (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-02-01)
    • Overpaid or Underpaid? Public Employee Compensation in the State of Alaska

      Guettabi, Mouhcine; Berman, Matthew (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-07-01)
      Are state workers better paid than their counterparts in private industry? That question is likely to come up more often, as the state deals with a huge budget shortfall. The answer is generally no, but there are exceptions. We analyzed the question in two ways, using different data sources for cash wages but the same assumptions about benefit levels.1 Using two sources helped us better answer the question, and each yielded the same broad conclusion: state workers are not on average paid more. That’s true, whether we consider just wages, or total compensation— wages plus benefits. But there are significant differences in pay and total compensation of public and private workers in individual occupations. We did this research for the Alaska Department of Administration (see back page). Below we summarize our findings, and inside report more details.
    • Overview of 'Violence against American Indian and Alaska Native Women and Men: 2010 Findings from the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey

      Rosay, André B. (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2016-06-16)
      This Powerpoint, presented as part of a Congressional briefing, examines findings from a study of the prevalence of violence against American Indian and Alaska Native women and men based on a nationally representative sample from the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS). Findings included estimates of sexual violence, physical violence by intimate partners, stalking, and psychological aggression by intimate partners, as well as estimates of interracial and intraracial victimizations. The briefing was coordinated through the National Indigenous Women’s Resource Center, the Indian Law Resource Center, and the National Congress of American Indians.
    • An Overview of Alaska's Natural Assets - Main Report and Research Summary

      Larson, Eric (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 1998)
      Alaska’s natural assets kept Native people alive for centuries, drew fortune-hunters here in the 1800s, and sustain the modern economy. But what are all these “natural assets,” how abundant are they, and what is their value? The Alaska Conservation Alliance contracted with ISER to sketch the big picture of Alaska’s natural assets—ranging from spectacular scenery to huge petroleum and coal deposits to habitat for a big share of the world’s migrating waterfowl. This report is a broad overview of the abundance, status, and value of Alaska’s primary natural assets. These assets include all aspects of nature that provide some benefits, services, income, or value. These benefits include life support services such as water storage, regulation of the chemical composition of the atmosphere, and cycling nutrients through the food chain. The natural environment provides valuable raw materials such as oil, trees, and minerals that we make into products. We also relyon nature for fish, crops, livestock, and wild animals that we consume as food. Nature is also a valuable resource for non-consumptive use. For example, we enjoy outdoor recreation such as camping, hiking, picnicking, viewing wildlife, and skiing. These non-consumptive uses of nature enrich our lives and are the basis for much of the Alaska tourism industry.In Part II of this report we identify and describe major components of our natural assets. Because this is an overview, we take a broad look at many aspects of our natural assets and pass quickly across a lot of detail. In Part III of this report, we look more closely at why these assets are valuable and present methods to estimate the monetary value of selected natural assets.
    • Overview of Sexual Assault in Alaska

      Rosay, André B. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2010-08-20)
      This Powerpoint slide presentation provides an overview of key results from UAA Justice Center research and statistics from other sources on sexual assault in Alaska, presented before a roundtable discussion with officials from the U.S. Department of Justice sponsored by the Alaska Native Justice Center.
    • Overview of UAA Justice Center Violence against Women Research

      Rosay, André B. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2009-02-18)
      This Powerpoint presentation presents an overview of key results from Justice Center research on violence against women in Alaska, including studies on sexual assault, stalking, and domestic violence through February 2009.
    • Overview of Violence against American Indian and Alaska Native Women and Men: 2010 Findings from the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey

      Rosay, André B. (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2016-06-16)
      This Powerpoint, presented as part of a Congressional briefing, examines findings from a study of the prevalence of violence against American Indian and Alaska Native women and men based on a nationally representative sample from the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS). Findings included estimates of sexual violence, physical violence by intimate partners, stalking, and psychological aggression by intimate partners, as well as estimates of interracial and intraracial victimizations.
    • Overweight and Obesity Knowledge Assessment of Alaskan Nurse Practitioners

      Cerutti, Kelly M (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-05-01)
      The purpose of this project was to describe Alaskan Nurse Practitioners (NPs) current practice and beliefs regarding overweight and obesity, and to identify barriers that may prevent evidence based management. A descriptive study was conducted using a convenience sample of 116 Alaskan NPs who completed The Treatment of Obesity Questionnaire. Findings revealed which factors NPs considered to determine risk status; their current management strategies; barriers to treatment; and, their beliefs regarding the etiology of obesity. An open-ended question revealed other treatment strategies, barriers, and beliefs regarding the treatment of overweight and obese patients.
    • Parole and Probation in Alaska, 2002–2016

      Reamey, Random (Alaska Justice Information Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-06-05)
      This fact sheet presents data on the characteristics of offenders who came under the supervision of the Alaska Department of Corrections, Division of Probation and Parole (DOC-PP) between 2002 and 2016. Probation and parole offender data are from the Alaska Department of Corrections’ annual Offender Profile publication. Overall trends saw numbers of probationers and parolees increasing from 2002 to 2012, then decreasing through 2016. The majority of probationers and parolees are between 20 and 34 years old. The trend for both males and females followed the overall trend, increasing from 2002 to 2012 then decreasing. On average, from 2002 to 2016, Alaska Natives were 26.7% of the probation and parole population, Asian & or Pacific Islander 4.1%, Black 8.7%, and White 56.1%.
    • Passport series

      Jeon, Jin Yeong; McTier, Jackson; Medvedko, Anastasia (University of Alaska Anchorage. Bookstore, 2015-04-13)
      The Passport series idea is to hear about students' life before coming to UAA and the challenges you face living in Anchorage and going to school at UAA. This episode features: Jin Yeong Jeon from South Korea, Jackson McTier from Australia, and Anastasia Medvedko from Russia.
    • Passport series: China and Brazil

      Wang, Yuqing; Na, Xinlei; Rodrigues, Ana Spaic (University of Alaska Anchorage. Bookstore, 2015-04-20)
      Come and hear about international studetns' lives before coming to UAA and the challenges they face living in Anchorage and going to school at UAA. China and Brazil with Yuqing Wang, Xinlei Na, and Ana Spaic Rodrigues.
    • Passport Series: South Korea, Hungary, Gambia

      Choi, Kyung Yeun; Berecz, Anna; Forster, Doreen (University of Alaska Anchorage. Bookstore, 2015-04-16)
      Come and hear about international students' life before coming to UAA and the challenges they face living in Anchorage and going to school at UAA. Kyung Yeun Choi, South Korea; Anna Berecz, Hungary, Doreen Forster, Gambia.
    • The Past and Future of LNG in Alaska

      Tussing, Arlon R. (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2005)
      Why do negotiations between the State and the North Slope gas producers ignore LNG [liquefied natural gas] export proposals, including that of the Alaska Gasline Port Authority [AGPA]? The three main North Slope gas producers [ConocoPhillips, BP and ExxonMobil], and Alaska’s Murkowski Administration, agree that an overland pipeline from Prudhoe Bay, crossing Canada to the U.S. Midwest, is the most promising transport system under present and foreseeable conditions, for marketing Arctic gas. Nevertheless, plans to ship LNG in “cryogenic” [low-pressure refrigerated] tankers from a Southcentral Alaska port such as Valdez or Kenai, to the Lower 48 or East Asia remain technically plausible marketing alternatives to a transcontinental gas pipeline. Currently, the most prominent proposal for such an alternative is sponsored by the Alaska Gasline Port Authority [AGPA], a coalition of three municipalities—the North Slope and Fairbanks North Star Boroughs, and the City of Valdez—which are located North to South along the route of the TransAlaska oil pipeline from the Arctic Ocean to Prince William Sound.
    • The Path to a Fiscal Solution: Use Earnings from All Our Assets

      Goldsmith, Oliver Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-04-23)
      Thanks to a combination of good decisions and a little luck, today Governor Hammond’s vision has become a reality. More than $60 billion in financial accounts now generates more income for the state government than petroleum production. Yet we continue to rely mostly on current petroleum revenues to pay for public services—and as oil production declines, “sliding down the falling Prudhoe Bay revenue curve” is proving to be a formula for fiscal and economic disaster. In fiscal year 2016, General Fund revenues are expected to be only about $2.2 billion. That will leave an apparent “deficit” of about $3.3 billion, based on spending of $5.5 billion. But the state doesn’t have to face such a huge shortfall. There is a straightforward solution that Jay Hammond foresaw: using both current revenues and earnings from the state’s portfolio of assets (financial accounts and future petroleum revenues) to pay for public services.
    • Pathways to College Preparatory Advanced Academic Offerings in the Anchorage School District

      Hirshberg, Diane; Frazier, Rosyland (Center for Alaska Education Policy Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-10-14)
      There are many ways a child in the Anchorage School District (ASD) can access advanced course offerings. To a parent these pathways may seem complex. ASD offers options for gifted and highly gifted students at the elementary and middle school level, and accelerated, and enriched learning opportunities such as honors and advanced placement courses at the secondary level. These opportunities, though linked, are not the same, nor do they necessarily follow from one to another in a straight path. Moreover, pathways to and through these opportunities can be quite different. Offerings are different at the elementary, middle and high school levels, with differing qualifications and eligibility. And, some of the programs are only offered in a few particular schools. This variety provides lots of flexibility. It also creates a complex path of choices and decisions. In all of these pathways and choices, active advocacy by a parent is necessary to ensure that their child receive the best and most appropriate opportunities. In this report we describe the many advanced and accelerated learning opportunities available in Anchorage elementary, middle and high schools, and the ways students can access these opportunities. We provide visuals including figures, tables and text to highlight the pathways to and through advanced offerings from Kindergarten to 12th grade. This document is based upon publicly available information. We have combined information from the ASD gifted program website the ASD High School Handbook, the ASD High School Program of Studies guide, and minutes of the ASD Board meetings. We also spoke with staff in the gifted program at ASD. Individual school-level issues that are outside of ASD policy and procedures have not been included. This report focused on the services, programs and schools within the Anchorage School District that service as pathways to college preparation and advance academic course offerings. As we describe in more detail in this report, there are very different offerings and paths at the elementary, middle and high school. In general, there are gifted and highly gifted programs at the elementary and middle school level, and a highly gifted program at the high school level. At all school levels, the highly gifted programs are offered at a limited number of schools. In high school, all students (including those in the highly gifted program) have the opportunity to take honors and advanced placement classes. Math is not included in the middle and high school gifted program. Math instead is a curriculum progression. Advanced math opportunities usually start in 6th grade, when students can choose placement into math courses that are a higher than the usual level. Opting for advanced math in 6th grade puts a student on track to reach Algebra I in 8th grade and calculus in 12th. At the elementary school level ASD operates gifted programs in all schools and a highly gifted program in one. There are also alternative and optional schools, which offer accelerated and enriched learning environments. If a student is in the highly gifted or gifted program in elementary school, he or she usually transitions to gifted and highly gifted middle school programs. In middle school these programs 3 include gifted language arts and science classes. Students who were not a part of the gifted program in elementary school can access the middle school gifted program, by testing in. Many optional and alternative programs provide enriched and accelerated classes to all students in them. For high school students there is a greater variety of advanced offerings. Starting in 9th grade there are honors and Advanced Placement (AP) courses, Credit-by-Choice options, and optional programs within the high schools and alternative schools. Students in the middle school gifted and highly gifted program have the opportunity to transition into the high school Highly Gifted Program.
    • Pathways to College Preparatory Advanced Academic Offerings in the Anchorage School District

      Frazier, Rosyland (Center for Alaska Education Policy Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-10-01)
      There are many ways a child in the Anchorage School District (ASD) can access advanced course offerings. To a parent these pathways may seem complex. ASD offers options for gifted and highly gifted students at the elementary and middle school level, and accelerated, and enriched learning opportunities such as honors and advanced placement courses at the secondary level. These opportunities, though linked, are not the same, nor do they necessarily follow from one to another in a straight path. Moreover, pathways to and through these opportunities can be quite different. Offerings are different at the elementary, middle and high school levels, with differing qualifications and eligibility. And, some of the programs are only offered in a few particular schools. This variety provides lots of flexibility. It also creates a complex path of choices and decisions. In all of these pathways and choices, active advocacy by a parent is necessary to ensure that their child receive the best and most appropriate opportunities. In this report we describe the many advanced and accelerated learning opportunities available in Anchorage elementary, middle and high schools, and the ways students can access these opportunities. We provide visuals including figures, tables and text to highlight the pathways to and through advanced offerings from Kindergarten to 12th grade. This document is based upon publicly available information. We have combined information from the ASD gifted program website the ASD High School Handbook, the ASD High School Program of Studies guide, and minutes of the ASD Board meetings. We also spoke with staff in the gifted program at ASD. Individual school-level issues that are outside of ASD policy and procedures have not been included. This report focused on the services, programs and schools within the Anchorage School District that service as pathways to college preparation and advance academic course offerings. As we describe in more detail in this report, there are very different offerings and paths at the elementary, middle and high school. In general, there are gifted and highly gifted programs at the elementary and middle school level, and a highly gifted program at the high school level. At all school levels, the highly gifted programs are offered at a limited number of schools. In high school, all students (including those in the highly gifted program) have the opportunity to take honors and advanced placement classes. Math is not included in the middle and high school gifted program. Math instead is a curriculum progression. Advanced math opportunities usually start in 6th grade, when students can choose placement into math courses that are a higher than the usual level. Opting for advanced math in 6th grade puts a student on track to reach Algebra I in 8th grade and calculus in 12th. At the elementary school level ASD operates gifted programs in all schools and a highly gifted program in one. There are also alternative and optional schools, which offer accelerated and enriched learning environments. If a student is in the highly gifted or gifted program in elementary school, he or she usually transitions to gifted and highly gifted middle school programs. In middle school these programs 3 include gifted language arts and science classes. Students who were not a part of the gifted program in elementary school can access the middle school gifted program, by testing in. Many optional and alternative programs provide enriched and accelerated classes to all students in them. For high school students there is a greater variety of advanced offerings. Starting in 9th grade there are honors and Advanced Placement (AP) courses, Credit-by-Choice options, and optional programs within the high schools and alternative schools. Students in the middle school gifted and highly gifted program have the opportunity to transition into the high school Highly Gifted Program. The following table provides a look at advanced offerings at different school levels. Each of these offerings is discussed in the report.
    • Pediatric Lead Screening in the United States: A Comparative Analysis

      Sykes, Genevieve (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-01-05)
      The purpose of this project is identification of approaches to pediatric lead screening in the United States by each of the fifty states and evaluation of whether best practice is being utilized. Data was obtained from publicly available state based websites and interaction with state departments; there were no participants in this project. The data was compared and contrasted among each of the fifty states and against current screening recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC]. Only one state, Delaware, has screening recommendations current with CDC standards. There is a large amount of variation between how state approaches pediatric lead screening. Several recommendations were proposed for the improvement of pediatric lead screening in the United States, including the following; all test results be reported in every state, states should assess need for screening universally versus screening Medicaid-eligible children only, states update their geographic risk areas yearly, screening recommendations be made available in a single area, and all questionnaire include questions about symptoms, lead sources, hand washing, and children with risk.