• Preliminary Investigation of the Economic Effects of Critical Habitat Designation for the Spectacled Eider and Steller's Eider on Alaska's North Slope

      Goldsmith, Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2000)
      This report was prepared for BP Exploration (Alaska) Inc. and Phillips Alaska Inc. in response to the call for comments on a potential Critical Habitat Designation.
    • Preliminary Results From the Long-Term Inmate Survey: Focus on Child Abuse Histories

      Langworthy, Robert H.; Barnes, Allan R.; Curtis, Richard (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 1998-04-21)
      This preliminary report of long-term inmates in Alaska correctional facilities finds that over 80 percent of long-term inmates report having been physically abused as children, over 65 percent report having suffered neglect. Other findings related to the child abuse histories of long-term inmates are also reported.
    • Preoperative Smoking Cessation Intervention: A Critical Appraisal of the Evidence With Practice Recommendations

      Townsley, Casta (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-12-04)
      Smoking is the single most important risk factor in the development of postoperative complications. Daily smoking increases the risk of postoperative complications by a factor of two to four. Smoking cessation preoperatively is beneficial in increasing rates of cessation and therefore reducing the incidence of complications postoperatively. As a result, smoking cessation should be recognized as a core element of care for the preoperative management of the surgical patient. Although the benefits of smoking cessation are well established, as is substantial evidence demonstrating that brief interventions are effective in increasing cessation rates among users, clinicians fail to consistently address the issue of tobacco use or provide smoking cessation interventions. Referral to elective surgical procedures provides an excellent opportunity for primary providers to promote smoking cessation interventions.
    • Presentation to the Team at the First Annual Partner Review 2015

      Wisniewski, Helena S. (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-06-29)
    • Pretrial Intervention and Chronic Offenders

      Schafer, N. E. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1988-10-05)
      The Alaska Pretrial Intervention (PTI) program of the Alaska Department of Law operated in 13 locations throughout the state from 1983 to 1986, when economic pressures resulted in the program's termination. The program was intended to provide an alternative to full prosecution in cases where the offense behavior did not appear to warrant it. This paper analyzes recidivism in the PTI program through examination of chronic offenders, defined as PTI clients who were rearrested for the same charge as that for which they had initially been referred to the program.
    • Pretrial Risk Assessment Tool Developed for Alaska

      Cravez, Pamela (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-01-16)
      Beginning January 1, 2018, judicial officers, defense attorneys, and prosecuting attorneys in all Alaska courts began to receive information from a new pretrial risk assessment tool that calculates whether a defendant is at low, moderate, or high risk for failure to appear at trial or to commit another crime if the defendant is released pretrial. The tool, incorporated in Alaska’s new bail statute, aids in the judicial officer’s decision regarding pretrial bail conditions. This article looks at risk assessment tools in general and describes the development of Alaska’s pretrial risk assessment tool.
    • Prevention of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders: Practice Behaviors, Attitudes, and Confidence among Members of the American College of Nurse-Midwives

      Neander, Lucia; Hanson, Bridget; Porter, Rebecca (Center for Behavioral Health Research & Services, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2017-06-01)
      As part of an ACNM collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and its partners and grantees on a project to prevent fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs), ACNM members were surveyed to generate an assessment of practice behaviors of certified nurse-midwives and certified midwives related to the prevention of FASDs. The information will be used as a baseline from which to measure change in nurse-midwives’ and midwives’ practice behaviors over the course of the project. Results from the assessment will also be used to inform detailed collaborative activities between ACNM and CDC grantees whose efforts specifically target nurse-midwives (i.e., University of Alaska Anchorage (UAA), University of California San Diego, University of Pittsburgh).
    • Prevention of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders: Practice Behaviors, Attitudes, and Confidence among Members of the American College of Nurse-Midwives 2017

      Hanson, Bridget; Neander, Lucia; Porter, Rebecca (Center for Behavioral Health Research and Services, 2017)
      As part of an ACNM collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and its partners and grantees on a project to prevent fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs), ACNM members were surveyed to generate an assessment of practice behaviors of certified nurse-midwives and certified midwives related to the prevention of FASDs. The information will be used as a baseline from which to measure change in nurse-midwives’ and midwives’ practice behaviors over the course of the project. Results from the assessment will also be used to inform detailed collaborative activities between ACNM and CDC grantees whose efforts specifically target nurse-midwives (i.e., University of Alaska Anchorage (UAA), University of California San Diego, University of Pittsburgh).
    • Prevention of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders: Practice Behaviors, Attitudes, and Confidence among Members of the American College of Nurse-Midwives 2018

      Porter, Rebecca; Hanson, Bridget; Mertz, Robyn (Center for Behavioral Health Research and Services, 2018)
      As part of an ACNM collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and its partners and grantees on a project to prevent fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs), ACNM members were surveyed to assess the practice behaviors of certified nurse midwives and certified midwives related to the prevention of FASDs. Two surveys were conducted; the first served as a baseline from which to measure change in nurse-midwives’ and midwives’ practice behaviors over the course of the project. Results from the baseline assessment were also used to inform detailed collaborative activities between ACNM and CDC grantees whose efforts specifically target nurse-midwives (i.e., University of Alaska Anchorage (UAA); University of California, San Diego; University of Pittsburgh). The second survey was conducted 15 months after the baseline as a follow-up and findings were compared to the baseline.
    • Preventive Screenings Gap Analysis

      Frazier, Rosyland; Guettabi, Mouhcine; Wheeler, John; Cueva, Katie (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2013-10-01)
    • Price Formula Options for Alaska Pink Salmon

      Knapp, Gunnar (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 1992)
      The wide swings in fishermen's prices for Alaska pink salmon in recent years has reawakened interest in the possibility of introducing price formulas under which fishermen's prices would be based on the wholesale prices received by processors. There are a wide variety of possible formulas which would have different implications for fishermen and processors. This paper presents a simple framework for thinking about price formula options. To illustrate historic trends in wholesale prices and fishermen's prices, and to illustrate how different price formula options would have worked during the period 1980-1991, I used Alaska statewide data for average wholesale case prices, average fishermen's prices, and statewide harvest volumes. I used the Anchorage consumer price index--the only price index available for Alaska--to adjust prices from nominal to "real 1991 dollars". None of these data necessarily reflect the situation of salmon fishermen or processors in specific regions of Alaska, since wholesale prices, harvest prices, harvest volumes, and inflation rates differ for different regions. However, whether or not these data accurately represent what happened in specific regions does not matter for this paper: the main purpose is to illustrate how different price formulas work and their advantages and disadvantages for fishermen and processorsPrepared for discussion at a conference on Toward Prosperity Through Stability: Making the Most of Alaska's Pink Salmon October 30-31, 1992 in Ketchikan, Alaska.
    • Principles for Managing Fisheries to Facilitate Adaptation to Uncertain Effects of Climate Change

      Knapp, Gunnar (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 12/1/2007)
    • Prison Anger Reduction Programs Evaluation Development Project

      Schafer, N. E.; Barnes, Allan R. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1985-07-31)
      This report describes efforts to develop Alaska-specific norms for the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI), using the Megargee offender classification system, for use in program evaluations in Alaska correctional facilities, specifically for evaluation of three pilot anger reduction programs initiated at Alaska Department of Corrections institutions in late 1984/early 1985: (1) Women in Crisis (at Fairbanks Correctional Center); (2) M. E. N., Inc. (at Lemon Creek Correctional Center, Juneau); (3) Bering Sea Women's Group (at Nome Correctional Center). The report provides assessments of the three programs and the correctional centers where they were held and makes recommendations for completing the development of Alaska-specific MMPI-based norms and for the administration of the MMPI as pre- and post-test for measuring psychological changes — particularly in hostility/frustration levels — in participants in anger reduction programs.
    • Prison Visitation Policies in the U.S. And Alaska

      UAA Justice Center (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2014-02-19)
      This article examines prison visitation in Alaska and nationally based on a 2012 survey of prison visitation policies for all 50 states and in the federal prison system.
    • Prison Visiting Policies and Practices [manuscript]

      Schafer, N. E. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1991-01)
      Based on empirical evidence that visiting is significantly related to parole success, correctional administrators have begun to view family visits as one component of the rehabilitation process. Several authorities have encouraged correctional institutions to maximize visiting opportunities. Previous studies have noted geographical and architectural limits to such maximization. This paper reports the results of a national survey of visiting policies and draws comparisons with surveys reported in 1978 and 1954 to determine the extent to which prisons have increased efforts to make visiting a priority.
    • Prison Visiting Policies and Practices [paper]

      Schafer, N. E. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1987-10)
      Based on empirical evidence that visiting is significantly related to parole success, several authorities have encouraged correctional institutions to maximize visiting opportunities. Previous studies have noted geographical and architectural limits to such maximization. A decade of prison construction should have improved visiting opportunities. This paper reports the results of a national survey of visiting policies and draws comparisons with surveys reported in 1978 and 1954.
    • Prison Visiting: Is It Time to Review the Rules? [manuscript]

      Schafer, N. E. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1989-06-09)
      Visiting rules and regulations from 71 long-term adult correctional facilities from 31 states were collected and reviewed. Most of the rules cover five distinct areas: visitor application, visitor processing, contraband, conduct, and dress codes. The rules are described and discussed in light of recent standards which stress the importance of encouraging visitors. Suggestions and recommendations are included.
    • Prisoner Behavior, Staff Response: Using Prison Discipline Records

      Schafer, N. E. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1984-03)
      Official prison misconduct records are used to test some of the assumptions inherent in previous research based upon such records. Many of these studies used prison data to measure changes in prisoner behavior, while others used them to indicate changes in the actions and attitudes of prison staff. Analysis of one prison's official discipline records over a 30-month period reveals flaws in both approaches. The same data cannot serve to draw conclusions about both groups though they can provide information about both when supplemented with other research methods. Conclusions drawn from official prison misconduct records are more reliable when used to assess the end of the prison discipline process — assessing discretionary decisionmaking by staff — than at the beginning of the process — evaluating prisoner behavior.
    • Problems and Costs Associated With Underage Drinking

      Parker, Khristy (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2010-01-01)
      This research overview presents the most recent information (2007) on the public problems and costs of underage drinking in the U.S. and in Alaska, and describes Alaska's response. In 2007, Alaska was ranked 39th among U.S. states for total costs of underage drinking, but had the highest costs of underage drinking per youth, nearly twice the national average.
    • Professionalism in the Alaska Department of Corrections: Education and Experience [manuscript]

      Schafer, N. E. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1986-06)
      A survey of Alaska corrections personnel reveals that employees in all clasiffications tend to have more than the minimum education or experience required for their positions. More than 74 percent of college-educated corrections personnel earned degrees and more than 40 percent acquired their experience outside Alaska. The advantages and disadvantages of hiring large numbers of employees whose education and experience were gained elsewhere are discussed in the context of the unique problems of correctional service delivery in so large and diverse a state.