• Short Papers Prepared for the Law Reform Commission While in Australia

      Conn, Stephen (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1980)
      These four brief papers were submitted for the consideration of the Law Review Commission of Australia (later the Australian Law Review Commission) in its inquiry about whether it would be desirable to apply, either in whole or in part, Aboriginal customary law to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. The author presents suggestions and information based on his research on traditional law ways among Alaska Native peoples and the relationship between indigenous law and the western law system in Alaska.
    • Short-Run Economic Impacts of Alaska Fiscal Options

      Knapp, Gunnar; Berman, Matthew; Guettabi, Mouhcine (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-03-30)
      Today Alaskans are talking about how to close the huge budget deficit the state government is facing, with the oil revenues it has depended on for decades now a small fraction of what they once were. Alaska has had budget deficits for several years, and it has made budget cuts—but it has mainly relied on billions of dollars in savings from the Constitutional Budget Reserve and other funds to cover the deficit. Those savings are dwindling, and the state needs to take measures to close the deficit. An important consideration is how various ways of reducing the deficit might affect Alaska’s economy. This study compares potential short-run economic effects of 11 options the state might take in the next few years to reduce the deficit and that are sustainable over the long term. We looked at economic effects of several types of spending cuts and taxes, as well as reducing the Permanent Fund dividend— the annual cash payment the state makes to all residents—and saving less of Permanent Fund earnings. We’re not advocating or opposing any option: our purpose is to estimate and compare the magnitude of the short-run economic effects of different ways of reducing the deficit. Broadly speaking: • Different ways of collecting money from Alaskans affect those with lower and higher incomes in significantly different ways. • Anything the state does to reduce the deficit will cost the economy jobs and money. But spending some of the Permanent Fund earnings the state currently saves would not have short-run economic effects. Saving less would, however, slow Permanent Fund growth and reduce future earnings. • Because the deficit is so big, the overall economic effects of closing the deficit will also be big.
    • Short-Run Economic Impacts of Alaska Fiscal Options

      Knapp, Funnar; Guettabi, Mouhcne; Berman, Matthew (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 3/1/2016)
    • Sideways Rain

      Sydnam, Nancy Elliott (University of Alaska Anchorage. Bookstore, 2013-04-16)
      Sideways Rain is Dr. Nancy Elliott Sydnam's memoir of 20 years of travel in the stormy Aleutian and Pribilof Islands. Besides her work as a dedicated medical practitioner, Nancy Elliott Sydnam is an emphatic observer of human nature. In journal entries, letters, and poems she writes with deep affection about the landscape adn the people she encountered on her hazardous routes. Included in Sideways Rain are photos, a map of the islands, and an index of names.
    • Sigma Tau Delta Presents Poetry Slam

      University of Alaska Anchorage. Bookstore, 2018-04-26
    • Simple book enclosure instructions

      Gatlabayan, Mariecris; Schmuland, Arlene B. (2020)
    • A simple decomposition of Alaska's labor force participation rate

      Guettabi, Mouhcine (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 11/25/2019)
      In Alaska, similar to the rest of the country, the share of people working or seeking employment started declining in the early 2000's. The implications for lower labor force participation rates are numerous and have consequences on the tax base, government revenues, and economic growth. From 2000 to 2010, we find Alaska's labor force declined from 73.5 to 69.6% with more than 90% of the decline attributed to demographic shifts. From 2010 to 2018, the labor force participate rate went from 69.6 to 65% but the reasons for the decline were due to both behavioral adjustments (44.6%) and demographic shifts (55.3%). Lastly, we show that using the unemployment rate as a metric of the economy's health during times of significant labor force change can be misleading.
    • Simple Fiscal Outlook Model for Rural Alaska Communities

      Colt, Steve (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 1999)
      The Northwest Arctic Borough (NAB) faces a growing population and increased demands for education and public services. At the request of the Assembly, I have prepared a fiscal planning model that can be used to explore what might happen to the Borough's revenues and expenses over the next 20 years. The model looks at both general government and the NAB School District (NABSD). The model allows us to ask "what if....?" questions and get quick answers about how things might change. These cases demonstrate that if the Borough issues new debt that is considered to be "in lieu" of existing cash contributions to the School District for deferred maintenance, then it can cause a large decrease in foundation funding to the School District and would require significant additional school budget cuts. (The case presented already assumes continual tightening of the instruction budget.) Obviously there are variations on the assumptions presented here for Case 3 (new bonds) that would improve the foundation funding amounts. However the overall picture that seems to emerge is that without a continuation of local revenues passed through to the School District, the new bonds are not fiscally sustainable.
    • Small Community Oil Spill Preparedness Research Project

      Covert, Christopher (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-12-01)
      As transportation through the Arctic becomes more prevalent with tourism and oil exploration, small communities within the Arctic are susceptible to oil spills from fuel barges, passing ships, tank farms, and oily discharges. Oil spills threaten both humans and animals that co-habitat these Arctic regions. Little has been done to prepare these small communities in preparation for an oil spill and as a result they are not well protected. As the notion of globalization is incorporated into the Arctic it will be imperative to protect these small communities. To better understand this topic, the researcher took an analytical approach to identify and benchmark best practices, define the elements of preparedness, and then build the foundation for the overall project. An integral component of this research project was to build and deploy a self-assessing questionnaire to provide small communities the ability to self-assess their oil spill preparedness level. The results of the questionnaire will be used to derive a preparedness index value. The preparedness index value will be overlaid an interactive map to provide Arctic governments a better view of the level of preparedness of their small communities.
    • Small Scale Modular Nuclear Power: An Option for Alaska?

      Fay, Ginny; Schwörer, Tobias (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2011-03-03)
      Small Modular Reactor (SMR) Economic Screening Analysis SMRs are nuclear power plants smaller than 300 MW. Compat Design, factory-fabricated, scaleable, transportable. Modeling goals: Where in Alaska does currently developed SMR technology make economic sense? How sensitive are outcomes to varying capital and conventional energy costs?
    • Smart Justice in Alaska

      Armstrong, Barbara (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-11-06)
      Smart justice initiatives seek to reform criminal justice systems by reducing correctional populations and recidivism while lowering costs, maintaining offender accountability, and ensuring public safety. This article describes two smart justice initiatives underway in Alaska, “Results First” and “Justice Reinvestment."
    • SmartCam - Computational Photometer

      Siewert, Sam; Mock, Kenrick (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-06-29)
    • Smooth the Dying Pillow: Alaska Natives and Their Destruction [chapter]

      Conn, Stephen (VWGÖ-Verlag, 1990)
      The policy for Native self-determination in Alaska developed by the Congress and the state has sought to replace a tribal model of governance with a body of legislation which confirms land rights without the direct political involvement of Alaska Native villages. However, the author argues, the absence of tribes as formal political structures has contributed to a loss of self-determination among Alaska Natives and to serious negative effects on Native village life.
    • Smooth the Dying Pillow: Alaska Natives and Their Destruction [original paper]

      Conn, Stephen (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1988-07)
      The policy for Native self-determination in Alaska developed by the Congress and the state has sought to replace a tribal model of governance with a body of legislation which confirms land rights without the direct political involvement of Alaska Native villages. However, the author argues, the absence of tribes as formal political structures has contributed to a loss of self-determination among Alaska Natives and to serious negative effects on Native village life.
    • Snapshot of Employer-Sponsored Health Insurance in Alaska

      Guettabi, Mouhcine; Frazier, Rosyland; Knapp, Gunnar (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2014-09)
    • Snapshot: The Home Energy Rebate Program

      Goldsmith, Oliver Scott; Pathan, Sohrab; Wiltse, Nathan (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2012-05)
      Alaska’s state government has spent an estimated $110 million since 2008 for better insulation, new furnaces, and other retrofits for roughly 16,500 homeowners—10% of all homeowners statewide.1 That spending was under the Home Energy Rebate Program, which rebates homeowners part of what they spend to make their houses more energy-efficient and less expensive to heat.2 The state legislature established the current program in 2008, as energy prices were spiking. The Alaska Housing Finance Corporation (AHFC) administers it, and the Institute of Social and Economic Research and the Cold Climate Housing Research Center did this analysis for AHFC, assessing the broad program effects from April 2008 through September 2011. Changes in fuel use and heating costs reported here are estimates from AHFC’s energy-rating software; figures based on actual household heating bills aren’t currently available. The software uses house characteristics and location-specific information on weather and other factors to produce the estimates—but remember they are estimates.3
    • Snow Child

      Ivey, Eowyn; Stevenson, David (University of Alaska Anchorage. Bookstore, 2013-02-04)
      At this event, Eowyn discusses her book snow Child, reads a passage or two, and is interviewed by David Stevenson (director of the CWLA/MFA program.) The event is sponsored with Alaska Reads.
    • Snow Cover in Alaska: Comprehensive Review

      Gienko, Gennady; Lang, Rob; Hamel, Scott; Meehleis, Kurt; Folan, Tommy (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-04-01)
      This report presents the results of a statistical analysis of snow cover in Alaska using historical data acquired from the Global Historical Climate Network. Measurements of snow depth and snow water equivalence were collected for Alaska stations between 1950 and 2017. Data cleaning and a distribution analysis were completed for all stations. Finally regression equations were developed to estimate snow water equivalence using recorded snow depth data from Alaska stations. The project is partially supported by ConocoPhillips Arctic Science and Engineering Foundation, UAA, and the Structural Engineers Association of Alaska (SEAAK).
    • Snow Covered Pedestrian Crosswalk Enhancement Via Projected Light Demarcation

      Keogh, Hugh (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-05-01)
      Snow coverage of streets in Anchorage, Alaska, can visually block pedestrians and drivers from viewing painted crosswalk demarcations. This study investigates the potential of utilizing light projected onto the snow’s surface to mimic the intended demarcation of the painted demarcation during snow coverage. This is investigated via hypothetically fitting an existing crosswalk location with available-for-purchase manufactured light projectors. The configuration is then evaluated for angle of light projection, discomfort glare, and contrast. The proposed installation is found to be theoretically acceptable. However, further analysis could be performed regarding effective visual detection of contrast during driving conditions and regarding acceptable levels of disability glare.
    • Snow In May

      Melnik, Kseniya (University of Alaska Anchorage. Bookstore, 2014-12-22)
      Kseniya Melnik's book, Snow in May, introduces a cast of characters bound by their relationship to the port town of Magadan in Russia's far east, a former gateway for prisoners assigned to Stalin's forced-labor camps. Kseniya Melnik was born in Magadan, Russia and she moved to Alaska in 1998, at the age of 15. She received her MFA from NYU. Snow in May was short-listed for the International Dylan Thomas Prize and long-listed for the Frank O'Connor International Short Story Award.