• Stalking the Schoolwork Module: Teaching Prospective Teachers to Write Historical Narratives

      McDiarmid, G. Williamson; Vinten-Johansen, P. (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 1996)
      Few educational slogans have had more play over the last decade than “writing to learn”. The idea is intuitively appealing: that in striving to summarize, organize, synthesize, develop, and communicate ideas and information, we must, in the process, clarify and extend our own understandings. Many have championed the “writing to learn” cause. In the study described below, the first author, Vinten-Johansen, engaged his undergraduates, all of whom planned to teach, in a structured process of writing historical narratives. His purpose was to help them learn not only to make historical arguments in writing—a capacity that has applications far beyond academic history—but also to analyze the narratives of others as contestable products. In what follows, we examine the opportunities that Vinten-Johansen created to help students learn to write, the successive drafts of original narratives they produced, and their discussions of historical methods and reasoning. Our purpose is to explore whether a highly structured experience in writing historical narratives does help students learn this form of writing and the character of historical knowledge.
    • Stalking Victimization in the Municipality of Anchorage: Key Results from the 2015 Alaska Victimization Survey

      Rosay, André B.; Rosay (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage; Council on Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault, Alaska Department of Public Safety, 2017-01-27)
      This document is a two-page summary of key results on stalking victimization in the Municipality of Anchorage, Alaska from the 2015 Alaska Victimization Survey. The summary describes Alaska statutory definitions of the crime of stalking, methodology and limitations of the survey, and estimates of lifetime and past year stalking victimization experienced by adult women in the Municipality of Anchorage. The 2015 Alaska Victimization Survey for the Municipality of Anchorage was conducted from May to August 2015. Stalking estimates were released on January 27, 2017. Findings include: * 1 in 4 women in the Municipality of Anchorage have experienced stalking in their lifetime; * 1 in 18 have experienced stalking in the past year; * More than 30,400 women in the Municipality of Anchorage have experienced stalking in their lifetime; and * More than 6,100 have experienced stalking in the past year. The 2015 survey also showed that stalking was particularly common among women who experienced intimate partner violence or sexual violence: * Among women who experienced intimate partner violence or sexual violence in their lifetime, 46% (more than 24,400) were also stalked in their lifetime; * Among women who experienced intimate partner violence or sexual violence in the past year, 28% (more than 2,200) were also stalked in the past year.
    • Stalking Victimization in the State of Alaska: Key Results from the 2015 Alaska Victimization Survey

      Rosay, André B. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage; Council on Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault, Alaska Department of Public Safety, 2017-01-17)
      This document is a two-page summary of key results on stalking victimization in Alaska statewide from the 2015 Alaska Victimization Survey. The summary describes Alaska statutory definitions of the crime of stalking, methodology and limitations of the survey, and estimates of lifetime and past year stalking victimization experienced by adult women in Alaska. Results show that 1 in 3 women in Alaska have experienced stalking in their lifetime. One in 17 have experience stalking in the past year. More than 80,800 women in Alaska have experienced stalking in their lifetime, and more than 15,300 have experienced stalking in the past year. Stalking was even more common among women who had experienced intimate partner violence or sexual violence.
    • Stalking Victimization: Comparisons Between Alaska and U.S. Data

      Parker, Khristy (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2011-01-01)
      This research overview presents information on stalking victimization currently available for Alaska and notes contrasts and similarities with the U.S. national data on stalking, looking in particular at gender, age, race, and relationship between victims and offenders. Limitations on the comparability of Alaska and national data are noted.
    • 'Stand Your Ground': History and Effects

      Payne, Troy C. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2013-11-07)
      This slide presentation discusses Stand Your Ground laws in other states and available research on the impact of these laws. The presentation was presented as part of a community forum at Clark Middle School in Anchorage on "Stand Your Ground Law in Alaska" sponsored by the Anchorage Community Police Relations Task Force and the Anchorage Equal Rights Commission.
    • Standard operating procedure for in-process welding on pipelines and facilities

      Loosli, Seth (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-12-01)
      In-process welding has become a commonly used approach when installing upgrades or making repairs to piping systems that are live. Pipeline incidents occur every year, and they are often deadly and expensive. The research of this project set out to find out what components a standard operating procedure should have that would lead to reaching a zero percent incident rate while utilizing in-process welding to make money. Not every contractor has the internal processes formalized to perform this work safely in a high-quality manner. Successful execution of this work can lead to opportunities for contractors to expand their scope of operation and expertise further.
    • Standard Operating Procedures for Community Emergency Response Teams (CERT)

      Torres, Michelle (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2014-04)
      The Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) Program educates people about disaster preparedness for hazards that may impact their area and trains them in basic disaster response skills. Using the training that they learn in the classroom and during the exercises, CERT members can assist others in their neighborhood or workplace following an event when professional responders are not immediately available to help. CERT members also are encouraged to support emergency response agencies by taking a more active role in emergency preparedness projects in their community. People who go through CERT training have a better understanding of the potential threats to their home, workplace and community and can take the right steps to lessen the effects of these hazards on themselves, their homes or workplace.
    • State and Local Law Enforcement Personnel in Alaska: 1982–2011

      Myrstol, Brad A. (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2013-02)
      This fact sheet presents data for 1980–2011 on state and local law enforcement personnel in Alaska. Data is drawn from the annual Crime in Alaska report of the Alaska Department of Public Safety and the annual Crime in the United States report of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, both of which are part of the FBI's Uniform Crime Reports (UCR) program.
    • State and Local Law Enforcement Personnel in Alaska: 1982–2012

      Parker, Khristy (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2014-08)
      This fact sheet presents data for 1982–2012 on state and local law enforcement personnel in Alaska, including size of law enforcement agencies by number of employed personnel, police-citizen ratio, ratio of sworn officers to civilian employees, and employment of women as sworn officers. Data is drawn from the annual Crime in Alaska report of the Alaska Department of Public Safety and the annual Crime in the United States report of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, both of which are part of the FBI's Uniform Crime Reports (UCR) program.
    • State Enforcement of Alaska Native Tribal Law: The Congressional Mandate of the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act

      Conn, Stephen; Garber, Bart Kaloa (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1989-10-27)
      Law journals, newspapers, and the courts all document Native unrest and dissatisfaction with state management of Native subsistence lifestyles. It is the thesis of this paper that the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act (ANILCA) requires the state to discover and incorporate community-derived tribal law — customs and traditions regarding the taking and gathering of wild, renewable resources — as the applicable minimum federal standard to the extent that conservation of the resource permits.
    • State of Alaska Election Security Project Phase 2 Report

      Martin, Stephanie; Picard, LuAnn; Ayers, Mark; Hoffman, David B.; Mock, Kenrick (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2008-05)
      A laska’s election system is among the most secure in the country, and it has a number of safeguards other states are now adopting. But the technology Alaska uses to record and count votes could be improved— and the state’s huge size, limited road system, and scattered communities also create special challenges for insuring the integrity of the vote. In this second phase of an ongoing study of Alaska’s election security, we recommend ways of strengthening the system—not only the technology but also the election procedures. The lieutenant governor and the Division of Elections asked the University of Alaska Anchorage to do this evaluation, which began in September 2007.
    • State of the Data: Migration, Fuel Costs, Community Viability

      Colt, Steve; Kane, Joan (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2008-02-01)
    • State Operated Jails: How and Why

      Schafer, N. E. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1994-03)
      From the 1931 Wickersham Commission through the 1967 President's Commission and the 1973 National Advisory Commission, criminal justice experts and observers have recommended that state governments assume responsibility for jail operations. Currently six states operate jails: Alaska, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Rhode Island and Vermont. An examination of jail operations in these states shows that history and tradition as well as geography and politics form the impetus for state assumption of jail operations.
    • The Status of Alaska Natives Report 2004 Volumes I - III

      Leask, Linda; Marshall, David; Goldsmith, Scott; Hill, Alexandra; Angvik, Jane; Howe, Lance; Saylor, Brian L. (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2004)
      The Alaska Federation of Natives asked ISER to report on social and economic conditions among Alaska Natives. We found that Natives have more jobs, higher incomes, and better living conditions, health care, and education than ever. But they remain several times more likely than other Alaskans to be poor and out of work. Alcohol continues to fuel widespread social problems. Native students continue to do poorly on standard tests, and they’re dropping out in growing numbers. Rates of heart disease and diabetes are rising. In the face of all these challenges, subsistence remains critical for cultural and economic reasons. And there are more challenges to come. In the coming decade, when economic growth is likely to be slower than in the past, thousands more young Alaska Natives will be moving into the job market. Volume II and Volume III of the Status of Alaska Natives Report contain data tables generated from the 2000 U.S. census describing the Alaska Native American population by the 12 Alaska Native Regional Corporation boundaries. Volume II shows data for the population in Alaska reporting Native American as their only race (Alaska Native or American Indian Alone) and Volume III shows data for the population reporting Native American in combination with some other race (Alaska Native or American Indian Alone or in Combination). At the time of the 2000 Census, there were 98,043 single-race Native Americans in Alaska and 119,241 people who identified themselves as Native American in combination with some other race. The tables in these volumes have been generated from a special file prepared by the U.S. Census Bureau that contains detailed information on the Native American population for the entire United States. The AIANSF (American Indian and Alaska Native Summary File) is accessible on the internet at http://factfinder.census.gov/servlet/DatasetMainPageServlet"
    • Status of Women in China

      Zeng, Annie (University of Alaska Anchorage. Bookstore, 2014-12-04)
      Annie Zeng discusses the status of women in China. Part of a series of presentations based on the book Empresses In the Palace.
    • Statute and implementation: How phantom policies affect tenure value and support

      Defeo, Dayna; Hirshberg, Diane; Berman, Matthew (Center for Alaska Education Policy Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 5/10/2018)
      Using survey responses from public school teachers and principals in Alaska, this article describes their understanding of tenure statute, and how that understanding affected support, perceived effectiveness, and valuation of tenure. Teachers and principals who inflated tenure protections were more likely to support it; the more teachers inflated tenure protections, the higher dollar value they placed on it. The article discusses the fiscal and policy implications of tenure inflation, noting that this garners the most criticism from education reformers, but concomitantly constitutes cost savings for taxpayers.
    • Stephanie Myers PM686A Spring 2014

      Boedigheimer, Stephanie (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2014-04-10)
    • Stock, Corporations, and Native Land Claims Settlement: One of a Series of Articles on the Native Land Claims

      Conn, Stephen (Alaska Department of Education; Center for Northern Educational Research, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 1975-06)
      This article focuses on the role of village and regional corporations as established under the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (ANCSA) of 1972. The booklet presents a simulated case study and open-ended class discussion questions relative to the use, purpose, and development of corporations, how corporations are managed and governed, and provisions of the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act which led to changes in Alaska law with regard to Alaska Native shares in ANCSA corporations. The article is one of a series by different authors designed to stimulate reading and discussion at an advanced secondary or adult level.
    • Stoking the flame: Subsistence and wood energy in rural Alaska, United States

      Schmidt, Jennifer I.; Byrd, Amanda; Curl, Jennifer; Brinkman, Todd J.; Heeringa, Krista (Elsevier BV, 2021-01)
      Energy costs are large and increasing in rural Alaska communities, so communities are turning to renewable energy. While, many of these communities have a mixed subsistence-cash economy, the relationship between renewable energy and subsistence has not been studied. Tanana, Alaska has a biomass program and we conducted interviews with 61 households in 2017 to understand how residents perceive the program and its association with subsistence activities. We analyzed Alaska Department of Fish & Game subsistence surveys from 89 communities to estimate differences in subsistence harvest between households that harvest wood and those that do not. Interviews indicated that people who harvest wood for the biomass program were six times more likely to engage in subsistence. Subsistence harvests were nearly double (184 kg/per capita) in households that harvested wood for personal use versus those that did not (101 kg/per capita). Equipment used for both activities was similar, and 57% respondents combined wood harvesting with other activities (e.g. subsistence, travel, etc.). Higher household incomes and employment were positively associated with subsistence participation (p < 0.001) while only household incomes was positively associated with wood harvest through the biomass program (p < 0.001). Overall, the program was perceived as having a positive effect (69%) for the community because it has created jobs (36%), saved people money (23%), promoted sharing (16%), and reduced fuel use by the community (15%). Our research shows that biomass programs have the potential to complement subsistence activities and enhance the sustainability of communities in rural Alaska that are faced with high energy costs.