• Environmental Justice in Alaska

      Cravez, Pamela (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-07-16)
      Pamela Cravez, editor of the Alaska Justice Forum, gives an overview of articles in the Summer 2018 edition, which addresses environmental contaminants in Alaska, some of the programs in place to deal with them, and the lasting impact that they are having on Alaska Native communities.
    • Environmental Justice: Challenges of Contaminated Site Cleanup in Rural AK

      Williams, Paula; Cravez, Pamela (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-07-16)
      Efforts to clean up contaminated sites from military installations and other sources have been ongoing in Alaska since the 1980s, and new sites continue to be identified. Most Formerly Used Defense Sites (FUDS) properties are in remote locations, placing a disproportionate impact on Alaska Native communities that depend upon environmental resources for their livelihood. Cleanup projects that are begun may take many years to complete due to the complicated nature of each site. Since 1990, over 5,300 sites have been cleanup up; more than 2,200 sites remain open, including military installations (both abandoned and active), bulk fuel storage and gas stations, airports and airfields, maintenance facilities, and oil exploration, transport, and refining facilities.
    • Is the Rate of Property Crime Increasing in Alaska? [transcript]

      Myrstol, Brad A.; Cravez, Pamela (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2017-10-18)
      Is the rate of property crime increasing in Alaska? Data from six Alaska jurisdictions show it’s a complex question. Dr. Brad Myrstol, interim Justice Center director developed a series of graphs to show how the rate of property crime in Alaska is impacted by factors including time, place of crime and type of crime. This presentation focuses on the property crimes of larceny-theft, shoplifting (which is a subcategory of larceny), burglary, and motor vehicle theft. The time period is from 1985 to 2016. The jurisdictions reviewed are: Anchorage, Fairbanks, Juneau, Kenai, North Slope Borough and Palmer. Each use the Uniform Crime Reports to report data. This is a transcript of the video presentation "Property Crime Rates 1985–2016: Is the Rate of Property Crime Increasing in Alaska? Trend Data from Six Alaska Police Agencies" which can be found at https://youtu.be/HiQqNyDgmas. Graphs by Brad A. Myrstol; produced & narrated by Pamela Cravez.
    • Myrstol Is New Justice Center Director

      Cravez, Pamela (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-04-02)
      Dr. Brad Myrstol is announced as the new director of the UAA Justice Center, and Pamela Cravez, editor of the Alaska Justice Forum, gives an overview of articles in the Spring 2018 edition.
    • Pretrial Risk Assessment Tool Developed for Alaska

      Cravez, Pamela (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-01-16)
      Beginning January 1, 2018, judicial officers, defense attorneys, and prosecuting attorneys in all Alaska courts began to receive information from a new pretrial risk assessment tool that calculates whether a defendant is at low, moderate, or high risk for failure to appear at trial or to commit another crime if the defendant is released pretrial. The tool, incorporated in Alaska’s new bail statute, aids in the judicial officer’s decision regarding pretrial bail conditions. This article looks at risk assessment tools in general and describes the development of Alaska’s pretrial risk assessment tool.
    • Sequential Intercept Model: Framework for a ‘Wicked Problem’

      Cravez, Pamela (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-04-02)
      The Sequential Intercept Model offers conceptual points at which a person with serious mental illness could be diverted from the criminal justice system and into community-based treatment. This article reviews the 2015 book "The Sequential Intercept Model and Criminal Justice" (New York: Oxford University Press), which looks at the success of programs along the intercept continuum. A workshop on the model sponsored by the Alaska Department of Corrections will be held in Anchorage in May 2018.
    • Sexual Assault Kit Initiative: Alaska Making Progress

      Cravez, Pamela (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-04-02)
      Victim-centered policies being developed by the Alaska Department of Public Safety for processing unsubmitted and untested sexual assault kits collected by Alaska State Troopers are one part of the state’s efforts to tackle more than 3,000 untested kits under grants from the Sexual Assault Kit Initiative of the Bureau of Justice Assistance, U.S. Department of Justice.
    • Summary of 2006 Southcentral Energy Forum

      Cravez, Pamela; Goldsmith, Scott; Larsen, Peter (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2006)
      Nearly 70% of Alaskans rely on relatively inexpensive natural gas from Cook Inlet. That gas heats homes and businesses, generates electricity, and fuels industrial processes. But growing demand has depleted 80% of the known Cook Inlet gas reserves. Many Alaskans are concerned about where Southcentral Alaska will get affordable energy in the future. The information presented here is not a product of ISER research. It is a summary of statements, opinions, and projections of those attending the forum.
    • Understanding Alaska: People, Economy, and Resources

      Foster, Mark; Cravez, Pamela; Cole, Terrence (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2006)
      Understanding Alaska is a special series of studies by the Institute of Social and Economic Research (ISER), to examine economic development issues and help Alaskans understand how their economy works. The studies began in 2001, and here we highlight some of the work so far. The University of Alaska Foundation has provided most of the funding for Understanding Alaska which examines how Alaska’s economy works, why it’s different from those in other states, and how Alaska’s unique circumstances affect economic development. This publication divides Understanding Alaska research into three categories: People, Economy, and Fisheries. At the end of each section is a list of the full reports or presentations excerpted for this overview. In some cases, we’ve updated information specifically for this publication.