• Violent and Property Offenses in Anchorage, 2003–2007

      Myrstol, Brad A.; Parker, Khristy (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2009-03-01)
      Presents crime rates and number of offenses for violent and property crimes in Anchorage known to police from 2003 to 2007. Figures presented, from the FBI's Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) program, are for the eight serious offenses defined as Part I offenses: murder/non-negligent manslaughter, forcible rape, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, larceny-theft, motor vehicle theft, and arson.
    • Violent and Property Offenses in Anchorage, 2003–2008

      Myrstol, Brad A. (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2009-06-01)
      Presents crime rates and number of offenses for violent and property crimes in Anchorage known to police from 2003 to 2008. Figures presented, from the FBI's Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) program, are for the eight serious offenses defined as Part I offenses: murder/non-negligent manslaughter, forcible rape, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, larceny-theft, motor vehicle theft, and arson. Figures for 2008 are compared with those for five other western U.S. cities — Boise, Colorado Springs, Portland, Salt Lake City, and Spokane.
    • Violent and Property Offenses in Anchorage, 2003–2009

      Parker, Khristy (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2011-04-01)
      This research overview presents information on serious violent and property crimes reported to Anchorage police for 2003–2009 collected as part of the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s Uniform Crime Reporting Program (UCR).
    • Youth Violence Study, Anchorage, AK: Youth Violence Progress Report

      Rosay, André B.; Chamard, Sharon (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2005-03-16)
      This slide presentation describes youth violence in Anchorage by providing initial comparisons between current Anchorage conditions and conditions of the past five to ten years, as well as initial comparisons between Anchorage and the rest of the U.S. Data shows that youth violence in Anchorage is not a serious problem, is at levels similar to or lower than national rates of youth violence, and is declining in Anchorage as it is nationally. Youth violence is also not perceived to be a serious problem in Anchorage, according to a public survey of Anchorage residents. Nonetheless, efforts to reduced and prevent youth violence in Anchorage are necessary; this progress report identifies some successful programs, and suggests how to develop policies to reduce levels of youth violence in Anchorage.