• Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 13, No. 1 (Spring 1996)

      Lerman, Averil; Bureau of Justice Statistics; National Institute of Justice; UAA Justice Center (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1996-03-01)
      The Spring 1996 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum presents an account based on historical research of the trial and execution for murder of a Native fisherman, Nelson Charles, in Juneau in 1939 — one of the last executions in Alaska, which abolished the death penalty in 1957. The Bureau of Justice Statistics reports on capital punishment in the U.S. in 1994, during which 13 states executed 31 prisoners. The second of two articles on the village component of a statewide public safety project conducted in 1994 by the Justice Center for the Alaska Department of Public Safety focuses on the information derived from on-site interviews conducted in twenty-eight rural communities with predominately Alaska Native populations; specific, localized arrangements for public safety are described. Research in Germany on the effect of alternative sanctions on juvenile offenders indicates that youthful offenders sent to prison have higher rates of recidivism than those given alternative sanctions.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 13, No. 2 (Summer 1996)

      UAA Justice Center; Bureau of Justice Statistics; Rieger, Lisa (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1996-06-01)
      The Summer 1996 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum presents several articles on legal resources, both criminal and civil, available to Alaskans with low incomes, describing services provided by the Alaska Public Defender's office and Alaska Legal Services Corporation; criteria for determining indigency when assigning public counsel in Alaska; a 1996 amendment to Alaska's Public Defender Act; criminal defense services for low income people throughout the United States; and tort reform efforts in Alaska and nationwide which may result in decreased access to the courts for individuals with low incomes. An additional article describes results of a recidivism study of participants in the Sex Offender Treatment Program at Hiland Mountain Correctional Center from January 1987 to August 1995.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 13, No. 3 (Fall 1996)

      Erlich, Richard; Bureau of Justice Statistics; Cravez, Pamela (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1996-09-01)
      The Fall 1996 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum leads with a discussion of the particularities of justice system issues in the Northwest Arctic Borough based on historical evidence, research and personal observations made from Judge Richard Erlich’s experience as a long-term resident and Superior Court judge in Kotzebue. The Bureau of Justice Statistics reports on criminal victimization in the United States in 1994. The Joint State-Federal Courts Gender Equality Task Force reports on its three-year investigation into gender bias in Alaska state and federal courts, finding that sex-related bias affects not only litigants, witnesses, lawyers, employees, and judges with regard to process, but also with regard to the substantial outcome of cases.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 13, No. 4 (Winter 1997)

      Claus, Haydee; Bureau of Justice Statistics (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1997-01-01)
      In the Winter 1997 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum, a certified interpreter for the federal and California court systems corrects misunderstandings about the nature of language interpretation in legal proceedings, observing that accurately interpreting to and from English in proceedings requires a language proficiency often misunderstood by participants in the court proceedings, and that lack of proficient interpretation can give rise to errors which threaten the integrity of the justice process. An accompanying sidebar describes the legal interpretation practice in Alaska courts and other Alaska justice agencies. A related article highlights two committees working on the problems presented by language interpretation and court proceedings in state and federal courts in Alaska. The Bureau of Justice Statistics reports on noncitizens in U.S. federal courts and prisons; sidebar stories describe background figures and information on noncitizens in Alaska and efforts of the Immigration and Naturalization Service to identify, apprehend, and deport criminal aliens. Dr. John E. Angell retires from his position as Director of the UAA Justice Center after over twenty years of service at the University of Alaska Anchorage.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 14, No. 1 (Spring 1997)

      UAA Justice Center; Bureau of Justice Statistics (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1997-03-01)
      The Spring 1997 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum presents from 1975 to 1995 on murder and nonnegligent manslaughter in Anchorage, Fairbanks, Juneau, and Alaska overall; compares Alaska rates with homicide rates nationwide; discusses weapons used and the relationship between victim and offender in Alaska homicides; and compares the murder rate with the rate of other causes of death in Alaska. The Bureau of Justice Statistics reports that sixteen states executed 56 prisoners during 1995, the largest number of prisoners executed in a year in the U.S. since 1960; and the use of capital punishment by nations worldwide is examined.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 14, No. 2 (Summer 1997)

      Moras, Antonia; Riley, John (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1997-06-01)
      The Summer 1997 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum examines community policing — an approach that relies on officer-initiated efforts to reduce crime and public disorder — and the Anchorage Police Department’s attempt to implement community policing in the Mountain View neighborhood of north Anchorage. Dr. Robert H. Langworthy has accepted the position of Director of the Justice Center at University of Alaska Anchorage.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 14, No. 3 (Fall 1997)

      Schafer, N. E.; Curtis, Richard (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1997-09-01)
      The Fall 1997 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum summarizes major findings of the final report of the Alaska Supreme Court Advisory Committee on Fairness and Access, reporting that the committee received few complaints of intentional racial or cultural bias by the court system, but learned about areas of unintentional bias, cultural misunderstandings, inadequate services, and lack of accessibility. Many of the committee's findings have relevance to justice system agencies beyond the court system. A Justice Center study of 28,618 referrals to the Alaska juvenile justice system found considerable disparity between white and minority youth in the rate at which they were referred, the frequency of their referrals, and the types of offenses which brought them to the attention of juvenile justice personnel.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 14, No. 4 (Winter 1998)

      Riley, John; UAA Justice Center (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1998-01-01)
      The Winter 1998 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum features several articles on juvenile justice, including figures on juvenile arrests in Alaska over from 1987 to 1996, during which the Alaska juvenile arrest rate actually declined; the provisions under Alaska Statutes for juveniles to be waivered into the adult justice system; and procedures and laws regarding the disclosure of records of juvenile offenders in Alaska and nationally. Research on the informal conversational patterns of correctional officers at Spring Creek Correctional Center, a maximum security prison in Seward, Alaska, shows how practices of cultural interpretation common to all work groups may pose particular public relations challenges to correctional officers and those who supervise them.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 15, No. 1 (Spring 1998)

      King, Rachel; Schafer, N. E. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1998-03-01)
      In the Spring 1998 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum, an assistant public defender who served from 1991 to 1994 in three jurisdictions in rural Alaska — Ketchikan, Kodiak, and Kotzebue — focuses on the situation of rural Alaska Natives to describe how several structural aspects of the criminal justice may contribute to the overrepresentation of Alaska Natives in the Alaska prison system. The second phase of a Justice Center study of racial disproportionality in juvenile referrals in Alaska looks at 33 youth who had five or more referrals, examining individual criminal histories and family backgrounds as revealed in the files, and notes noted that juveniles from rural communities sometimes received referrals for behavior that would have been handled informally in urban settings.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 15, No. 2 (Summer 1998)

      Moras, Antonia; Bureau of Justice Statistics (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1998-06-01)
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 15, No. 3 (Fall 1998)

      UAA Justice Center; Bureau of Justice Statistics (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1998-09-01)
      A study of Alaska prisoners, described in the Fall 1998 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum, finds that long-term inmates in Alaska prisons show evidence of having experienced a high rate of abuse during their childhoods; the study examined the issue of a “cycle of violence” and sought out correlates of abuse which may have an impact on offense patterns or inmate behavior. A Bureau of Justice Statistics report finds that the number of prisoners under the jurisdiction of federal or state correctional systems grew 5.2 percent during 1997. An Alaska Judicial Council study of felony probation revocation cases found that the reasons for revocation of probation status for Alaska Natives did not differ from those underlying revocation for non-Native offenders, but did find some difference by ethnicity for the original conditions of probation.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 15, No. 4 (Winter 1999)

      UAA Justice Center; Bureau of Justice Statistics (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1999-01-01)
      The Winter 1999 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum presents Alaska and U.S. figures on correctional populations over an eleven-year period from 1988 to 1998, during which time Alaska's prison population grew by 57 percent and its rate of incarceration grew by 18 percent, while the overall state population grew by only 16 percent. The Bureau of Justice Statistics reports that over 570,000 of the nation's prisoners (51%) reported the use of alcohol or drugs while committing their offense. Uniform Crime Reports statistics show that the overall rate of reported crime in Alaska grew by 7 percent from 1988 through 1997.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 16, No. 1 (Spring 1999)

      Atwell, Cassie; Trostle, Lawrence C.; Bureau of Justice Statistics (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1999-03-01)
      The Spring 1999 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum presents findings from a study of the effectiveness of the Brady Act in Alaska, focusing on procedures used by Alaska law enforcement agencies to determine eligibility of applicants for handgun purchases and looking at handgun purchase applications denied by the Anchorage Police Department; a related article presents views on problems with the Brady Act's implementation. The Bureau of Justice Statistics reports on capital punishment in the U.S. in 1997, and the use of the death penalty in by other nations is examined.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 16, No. 2 (Summer 1999)

      Riley, John; UAA Justice Center (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1999-06-01)
      The Summer 1999 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum opens with an article presenting figures on the use of firearms in the commission of violent crimes in Alaska and in the U.S. as a whole from 1980 to 1997. A recent book on the growth of mass incarceration is reviewed. Major findings from an Alaska Judicial Council report on a 15-month pilot probation program for misdemeanor domestic violence offenders in Palmer are summarized.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 16, No. 3 (Fall 1999)

      Moras, Antonia; UAA Justice Center (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1999-09-01)
      The Fall 1999 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum presents findings from a study of the nearly 2000 adults arrested by Anchorage police for drunk driving in 1996 and examines the adjudication process and case outcomes. A second article provides an overview of the structure and operation of the federal immigration court in Anchorage.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 16, No. 4 (Winter 2000)

      Riley, John; UAA Justice Center (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2000-01-01)
      Alaska Natives constitute approximately 17 per cent of the Alaska’s population, but are under-represented in justice system employment and over-represented among those who are arrested, convicted, and incarcerated and among those victimized by violent crime. The Winter 2000 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum presents preliminary results of a study of perceptions of correctional work among Alaska Natives which may influence the recruitment of Alaska Natives to careers in corrections. Statistics on Alaska Native and American Indian employment in the Alaska justice system are also provided. National data from the Bureau of Justice Statistics on criminal victimization of Alaska Natives and American Indians are presented, showing that the rate of violent victimization among Alaska Natives and American Indians is more than twice as high as the national average.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 17, No. 1 (Spring 2000)

      Giblin, Matthew; Atwell, Cassie (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2000-03-01)
      The Spring 2000 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum focuses on drugs and drug abuse, with articles on drug use among Anchorage arrestees, sources of data on illicit drug use, the national drug control budget, drug cases in federal and Alaska courts, substance abuse treatment programs in Alaska correctional institutions, and the increase in correctional populations due to the “war on drugs.”
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 17, No. 2 (Summer 2000)

      Wood, Darryl S.; Araji, Sharon (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2000-06-01)
      The Summer 2000 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum features findings from a study of officer turnover in Alaska's Village Public Safety Officer (VPSO) program, a review essay of the book "A Natural History of Rape" by Randy Thornhill and Craig T. Palmer, and national data on rape rates in the U.S. from 1973 to 1999 based on figures from the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS).
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 17, No. 3 (Fall 2000)

      Giblin, Matthew; Morrow, Phyllis; Riley, John (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2000-09-01)
      The Fall 2000 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum features articles on the Anchorage Coordinated Agency Network (CANS) program, designed to enhance supervision and services provided to juvenile probationers; continuing efforts in the Alaska judicial system to improve access to justice in cases involving speakers of language other than English; and a review essay on the book “Newjack,” which describes how the prison experience influences the lives and relationships of correctional officers. The Justice Center celebrates its 25th year as a research, academic, and public education institution.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 17, No. 4 (Winter 2001)

      Rieger, Lisa; Atwell, Cassie; Kelley, Pamela (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2001-01-01)
      The Winter 2001 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum opens with an article on the restorative justice practice of circle peacemaking in the Southeast Alaska village of Kake. This issue also reports on Alaska's progress in achieving compliance with the federal Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act, describes a learning project which gives Justice Center paralegal students working experience in the Anchorage Legal Services office, and summarizes major findings of an Alaska Judicial Council report on civil cases heard in Alaska courts.