• A simple decomposition of Alaska's labor force participation rate

      Guettabi, Mouhcine (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 11/25/2019)
      In Alaska, similar to the rest of the country, the share of people working or seeking employment started declining in the early 2000's. The implications for lower labor force participation rates are numerous and have consequences on the tax base, government revenues, and economic growth. From 2000 to 2010, we find Alaska's labor force declined from 73.5 to 69.6% with more than 90% of the decline attributed to demographic shifts. From 2010 to 2018, the labor force participate rate went from 69.6 to 65% but the reasons for the decline were due to both behavioral adjustments (44.6%) and demographic shifts (55.3%). Lastly, we show that using the unemployment rate as a metric of the economy's health during times of significant labor force change can be misleading.
    • Economic Effects of Climate Change in Alaska

      Berman, Matthew; Schmidt, Jennifer (American Meteorological Society (AMS), 11/27/2018)
      We summarize the potential nature and scope of economic effects of climate change in Alaska that have already occurred and are likely to become manifest over the next 30-50 years. We classified potential effects discussed in the literature into categories according to climate driver, type of environmental service affected, certainty and timing of the effects, and potential magnitude of economic consequences. We then described the nature of important economic effects, and provided estimates of larger, more certain effects for which data were available. Largest economic effects were associated with costs to prevent damage, relocate, and replace infrastructure threatened by permafrost thaw, sea level rise, and coastal erosion. The costs to infrastructure were offset by a large projected reduction in space heating costs attributable to milder winters. Overall, we estimated that five, relatively certain, large effects that could be readily quantified would impose an annual net cost of $340-$700 million, or 0.6 to 1.3 percent of Alaska GDP. This significant, but relatively modest net economic effect for Alaska as a whole obscures large regional disparities, as rural communities face large projected costs while more southerly urban residents experience net gains.
    • The Feasibility of Adopting an Evidence-Informed Tailored Exercise Program within Adult Day Services: The Enhance Mobility Program.

      King, Diane; Faulkner, S.A.; Hanson, Bridget (Taylor & Francis Group, 11/29/2017)
      This article uses the RE-AIM framework to evaluate the feasibility of implementing Enhance Mobility (EM), a tailored, evidence-informed group exercise and walking program for older adults with dementia, into an adult day services center. Participant physical performance outcomes were measured at baseline and 8 months. Program staff were interviewed to understand implementation challenges. Participant outcomes did not change significantly, though gait speed improved from limited to community ambulation levels. Implementation challenges included space reallocation and adequate staffing. Adopting EM in adult day services is feasible, and has potential to reach older adults who could benefit from tailored exercise.
    • Alaska's Economy and Housing Market

      Goldsmith, Scott; Berman, Matthew; Huskey, Lee; Leask, Linda; Hull, Teresa (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 12/1/1986)
    • Principles for Managing Fisheries to Facilitate Adaptation to Uncertain Effects of Climate Change

      Knapp, Gunnar (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 12/1/2007)
    • Repeat Maltreatment in Alaska: Assessment and Exploration of Alternative Measures

      Passini, Jessica; Vadapalli, Diwakar (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 12/1/2015)
    • Unlocking our Petroleum Wealth Potential: A Game Plan for Meeting Alaska's Fiscal Challenge

      Goldsmith, Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 12/1/2015)
    • Unlocking our Petroleum Wealth Potential: A Game Plan for Meeting Alaska's Fiscal Challenge

      Goldsmith, Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 12/1/2015)
    • Budget basics 1975-2021 - Revenues, Agency Operations, and Capital Spending

      Guettabi, Mouhcine (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 12/16/2019)
    • Local Knowledge and Science: Observation of Landscape Change in the Nuiqsut Homelands

      Schmidt, Jennifer; Kofinas, Gary (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 12/19/2018)
    • Traditional Athabascan Law Ways and Their Relationship to Contemporary Problems of "Bush Justice": Some Preliminary Observations on Structure and Function.

      Hippler, Arthur E.; Conn, Stephen (Institute of Social, Economic and Government Research, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 1972-08)
      This paper is directed toward helping achieve a better understanding of traditional law ways among Alaska's Athabascan Indians and of the present state of the administration of law in the "bush"-village Alaska. An outgrowth of the 1970 Bush Justice Conference sponsored by the Alaska Judicial Council, the paper's primary purpose is to help facilitate establishment of more appropriate delivery and administration of legal services for ethnically distinct populations of Alaska.
    • Notes on Representation of Native Clients

      Conn, Stephen; Hippler, Arthur E. (Institute of Social, Economic and Government Research, University of Alaska, Fairbanks, 1972-09-07)
      Native people, whether influenced by traditional approaches to dispute resolution or by their pragmatic experience with local courts and dispute resolution or by their pragmatic experience with local courts and law enforcement, do not see justice as being done within the forum offered by the state. In search of an authoritative locale for rational dispute resolution, they find arbitrary and apparently irrational treatment in magistrate courts. Conversely, they have found in conciliation before the village council a forum where misconduct is measured against the world that the defendant immediately affects. They find a comprehensible forum in the village to solve their problems or no forum at all. Can participation in a functioning advocacy and adversary system be taught and utilized along with continued functioning of a sub-legal conciliatory system that handles de minimus matters effectively? This paper offers guidance to public defenders and legal services attorneys in representing Alaska Native clients.
    • Interview with William R. Nix

      Conn, Stephen (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1973)
      William R. Nix, magistrate supervisor with the Alaska Court System and former an Alaska State Trooper, was interviewed in 1973 about law enforcement in bush Alaska during the early years of Alaska statehood; the relationships between Alaska State Troopers, village councils, magisrates of the Alaska Court System, and district attorneys in regional hubs; bail decisions for accused offenders; and the difficulties of establishing and maintaining a fair and equitable justice system in the predominately Alaska Native villages of rural Alaska.
    • Changing Urban Police: Practitioners' View

      Igleburger, Robert M.; Angell, John E.; Pence, Gary (U.S. Department of Justice, Law Enforcement Assistance Administration, National Institute of Law Enforcement and Criminal Justice, 1973-06)
      Police administrators are responsible for providing a police operation that serves the public needs. On the surface, this responsibility appears to be simple enough; however, the realities encountered in operationalizing it are enormously complex. It is the purpose of this paper to review and analyze urban policing and suggest methods that police administrators can use to improve the effectiveness of their police organizations.
    • Northern Eskimo Law Ways and Their Relationship to Contemporary Problems of "Bush Justice": Some Preliminary Observations on Structure and Function

      Hippler, Arthur E.; Conn, Stephen (Institute of Social, Economic and Government Research, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 1973-07)
      This paper describes the how the basic values, personality, and culture of Northern (Inupiat) Eskimos contribute to attitudes toward conflict and their society’s capacity to resolve conflict. The paper analyzes the influence of Anglo-American agents of change on that capacity and, especially, the legal system and procedures that developed in the post-contact use of the village council to resolve disputes. It discusses the formal intervention of state law through the magisterial system and its interaction with Eskimo law ways that the village council encouraged. A comparison of village councils and magistrate courts points out the apparent success of the councils due to their unique fit with Eskimo values and expectations. Finally, shortcomings of .the current magistrate system are analyzed with recommendations for policy adaptations.
    • The Extralegal Forum and Legal Power: The Dynamics of the Relationship — Other Pipelines

      Conn, Stephen (Institute of Social, Economic and Government Research, University of Alaska, Fairbanks, 1974-02-26)
      Diverse groups — e.g., Brazilian squatters, Navajos, village Eskimos and Indians — look to special forums to resolve disputes outside the formal legal system. These forums are employed because they accept disputes as defined by their clients and offer remedies based upon these conceptualizations. Formal agents of the law in their environments cannot do this. When these forums are extralegal (without formal legal authority to act) and are located in an environment where the formal legal process has the theoretical capacity to intervene in the disputes, they must tap into authentic lines of power to maintain their credibility with their constituents. Legal power is not usually formally delegated without defined limits upon its use. Because extralegal forums often must be free from the constraints of particular norms and processes, in order to correctly define and remedy disputes, extralegal forums seek borrowed power through special relationships with formal agents of legal power. Then they reapply it to meet the needs of their constituents. This paper describes the ways to study these relationships and their likely impact upon an informal forum. The author suggests a way of viewing extralegal dispute resolution in a given community against the larger matrix of relationships between the formal and informal legal process. He draws upon his field work in Brazilian squatter colonies, Navajo Indian communities, and rural Athabascan and Eskimo villages in Alaska.
    • An Exploratory Study of Changes Accompanying the Implementation of a Community-Based, Participatory Team Police Organizational Model

      Angell, John E. (Michigan State University, 1975)
      This exploratory research examines the attitudes of citizens, police clientele, and police in an area where a decentralized, participatory (collegial) team police operation has been implemented, and compares these attitudes with those in a similar neighborhood policed by a classical organizational structure and traditional procedures. The Team Police Model of this study consisted basically of 15 generalist police officers who, with the participation of local citizens, were responsible for defining police goals, priorities and procedures and providing all police services in a precisely defined, low-economic, minority, residential area of Holyoke, Massachusetts for a test period of approximately nine months. The Team used collegial methods for decisionmaking and task forces for performing management functions. The Team followed a "service", rather than "law enforcement" operational philosophy. The control neighborhood was policed by an organization arrangement which was in general consistent with Classical tenets as stated by Max Weber. A traditional "law enforcement" philosophy was used in the Classical neighborhood. The basic assumption underlying this study was police effectiveness in crime prevention and order maintenance is dependent on a supportive public. The primary problem researched was whether public and clientele attitudes toward the police were more supportive in the Team Police than a Classical Police area. Of secondary concern was the impact of the Team Police experiment on police officers attitudes. Perhaps the most important conclusion to be derived from this study is that, contrary to conventional wisdom, the collegial Team Police Model as implemented in this project did not have a negative impact on any variable investigated. The positive impact of the project on most variables supports the value of further research with a community-based, collegial team organizational structure for police services.
    • Staff Paper on Village Councils

      Hippler, Arthur E.; Conn, Stephen (Institute of Social, Economic and Government Research, University of Alaska, Fairbanks, 1975)
      This excerpt from the forthcoming UCLA-Alaska Law Review article "The Village Council and Its Offspring: A Reform for Bush Justice" describes techniques used historically by Alaska Native village councils to resolve disputes. All of these techniques were observed in 1975 in villages where councils still aid in dispute adjustment.
    • Legal Education for a Frontier Society: A Survey of Alaskan Needs and Opportunities in Education, Research and the Delivery of Legal Services

      Havelock, John E. (University of Alaska, 1975)
      Alaska is the only state of the United States that does not have a law school. This 1975 study, commissioned by the Alaska Legislative Council and the University of Alaska, is the first comprehensive investigation of the demand for legal and law-related services in Alaska and how that demand can best be met, including an examination of the feasibility of establishing a law school in the state. The study describes contemporary methods of delivering legal services in the state, with particular focus on the needs of rural and middle income Alaskans, and evaluates their cost and efficiency. It evaluates the present supply of lawyers and law-trained people in Alaska with reference to national trends in legal education, the migration to and admission of attorneys in Alaska, and the unique circumstances of Alaska law practice. It analyzes the need and demand for legal education in the state, and incorporates principal results of surveys of the general public and of Anchorage-area attorneys. The study concludes that there is no need to increase the supply of lawyers in Alaska by establishment of a law school and that many objectives which might be reached by a law school can also be reached by building on existing arrangements and models and development of other options for legal practice in Alaska such as paralegal training, particularly in rural areas of the state.