• Violent Crime Reported in Alaska, 1986–2015

      Parker, Khristy (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2017-02-20)
      This fact sheet presents data on violent crimes reported in Alaska from 1986 to 2015 as reported in the Alaska Department of Public Safety publication Crime in Alaska. "Violent crime" is an aggregate category that includes homicide (murder and non-negligent manslaughter), rape, robbery, and aggravated assault offenses reported to police. From 1986 to 2015, violent crime rates increased in Alaska although the overall crime rate decreased. Homicide and robbery rates declined over the 30-year period, while rape and aggravated assault rates increased from 1986 to 2015 – with aggravated assault acting as the main driver of increases in the violent crime rate over the period. On average, violent crime accounted for 11 percent of all crime reported in Alaska from 1986 to 2015. Aggravated assault accounted for nearly three-quarters, robbery for nearly 15 percent, rape for nearly 13 percent, and homicide for just over one percent of all violent crime reported in Alaska over the period.
    • Violent Crimes Compensation Board: Claims, FY 2004–FY 2014

      Parker, Khristy (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-04-01)
      This fact sheet presents data from the Alaska Violent Crimes Compensation Board (VCCB) on claims made and compensation granted to victims of violent crime for fiscal years 2004–2014. The report presents data on new claims filed, types of crime and types of expenses for which compensation was claimed, and compensation totals. On average, the five most common violent crimes resulting in applications for compensation over the eleven-year period were sexual abuse of a minor, domestic violence, assault, sexual assault of adults, and homicide.
    • Violent Death in Alaska: Who Is Most Likely To Die?

      Berman, Matthew; Leask, Linda (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 1994)
      Alaskans die by accident and commit suicide far more often than the national averages. They die in homicides at near the national rate. But when you look beyond the averages, it’s plain that some Alaskans are at much higher risk than others. This Review describes how rates of violent death—by which we mean deaths from accidents, suicides, and homicides—vary among Alaskans by race, sex, age, marital status, and place of residence. Differences in age and other factors don’t explain all the variation, but they give us a start in better understanding why violent death strikes some groups and places much more than others. The detailed analysis that follows is based on a computer file—provided by the Alaska Bureau of Vital Statistics—of death certificates of Alaskans who died between 1980 and 1990. This file includes recently revised statistics analyzed here for the first time. We calculated average death rates for that 11-year period, allowing us to see trends and to feel confident that rates for small towns don’t just reflect unusual circumstances in a single year.
    • Visiting Rules and Regulations: A Preliminary Study

      Schafer, N. E. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1988-04-04)
      Visiting rules and regulations from 71 long-term adult correctional facilities from 31 states were collected for review. The rules are divided into five areas: visitor application, visitor processing, contraband, conduct, and dress codes. They are reviewed in the light of recent standards which stress the importance of encouraging visits. Suggestions and recommendations for change are included.
    • Voluntary and Involuntary Child Support Payments in Alaska, February 1, 1987 to January 1, 1991 — Charts

      University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 1991)
      This document presents four figures with tables containing underlying data prepared from data from the Alaska Child Support Enforcement Division, comparing voluntary and involuntary child support payments in Alaska, February 1, 1987 to January 1, 1991.
    • Volunteer Recruitment and Sustainability Assessment: United Youth Courts of Alaska -- Final Report

      Rosay, André B. (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2004-11-01)
      In response to a request from United Youth Courts of Alaska, we conducted an assessment of volunteer recruitment and sustainability during the Seventh Annual Statewide Youth Court Conference held in November 2003 in Anchorage, AK. We conducted three simultaneous focus groups with a total of 22 youth court volunteers to assess the advantages and disadvantages of volunteering for youth courts and the benefits and costs of continuing to volunteer for youth courts. In particular, we asked youth court volunteers about ways to improve recruitment and sustainability. All youth court volunteers clearly enjoyed their volunteer experience and planned to continue volunteering. In order to recruit and maintain skilled volunteers, focus group participants recommended to: (1) Provide potential volunteers a more accurate description of youth courts, (2) Revise the training course, (3) More proactively curtail the volunteers’ use of drugs and alcohol, (4) Enhance parental involvement in fundraising and non-court activities, (5) Publicize how to get involved in youth courts, and (6) Reward volunteers with tangible incentives. Although none of these recommendations will surprise youth court directors, we hope that this independent evaluation will confirm their beliefs and provide justifications for progress and change. Most youth court volunteers expressed an interest helping their youth court to achieve these goals.
    • Walking the Talk: A Guide to Assessment Using the CAPRA Community Problem Solving Model

      Wood, Darryl S.; Rieger, Lisa (Alaska Native Technical Assistance and Resource Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2001-03)
      CAPRA is a community problem-solving model with five stages: C = Clients, A = Analysis, P = Partnership, R = Response, and A = Assessment. CAPRA was the problem-solving method used by the Alaska Native and Technical Resource Center (ANTARC). This guide describes the final stage of the CAPRA model—assessment—including the reasons for conducing an assessment, the documentation needed and why it is needed, and methods for evaluation. Discussion is with a particular focus on assessment methods for community problem-solvers in rural Alaska Native villages. Some background about CAPRA is assumed.
    • Warnings Against Myself: Memoirs of a Superstitious Mountaineer

      Stevenson, David (University of Alaska Anchorage. Bookstore, 2016-04-08)
      Book launch. David Stevenson is the director of the Creative Writing and Literary Arts Department at the University of Alaska Anchorage. He is the author of the short fiction collection Letters from Chamonix, winner of the Banff Mountain Festival Fiction Prize. Since 1995 he has been the book reviews editor at The American Alpine Journal.
    • Water Mask and Be-Hooved: Two New Books from Essayist Monica Devine and Poet Mar Ka2

      Ka, Mar; Devine, Monica (University of Alaska Anchorage. Bookstore, 2019-04-26)
      Essayist Monica Devine and poet Mar Ka discuss their recently published books, which explore their personal journeys through Alaska in memoir and poetry. Monica Devine's new book, Water Mask, is a collection of essays that chronicles her interactions with Alaska's land and its people. Her work is an "adventurous memoir that reflects on family, place, memory, work, perception and culture in a land that both beguiles and rejects." Monica worked as a speech/language therapist for many years, traveling to dozens of villages across Alaska. She has authored five children's books, including Iditarod: The Greatest Win Ever, which was a nominee for the celebrated Golden Kite Award. Her other awards include first place in the Alaska State Poetry Contest, a Pushcart nominee for her story, Mission of Motherhood, and a first-place award in creative nonfiction from New Letters journal for her story, On The Edge of Ice, about accompanying whalers on a spring hunt. Mar Ka's new poetry collection, Be-hooved, is a layered spiritual memoir structured along the seasons and framed by the migration of the Porcupine caribou herd. "Entrancing, profound, and startling, this book is a testament to hope before change, persistence before confusion, and empathy before difference." Poet Mar Ka, aka Mary Kancewick, traveled throughout Alaska during her years as an indigenous rights attorney. Her poetry has been published in national and international journals and on occasion has been set to music. The recipient of an NEH grant and the Midnight Sun Poetry Prize, she has long served as a poetry judge for the UAA/ADN Statewide Creative Writing Contest. She presently teaches poetry workshops at the Eagle River Nature Center. Water Mask and Be-Hooved are published by University of Alaska Press.
    • Webnote 21. The Growing Number of Alaska Children in Foster Care, 2011-2015

      Passini, Jessica; Vadapalli, Diwakar (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 3/1/2016)
    • What are the economic impacts of the vetoes?

      Guettabi, Mouhcine (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2019-07-08)
    • What are the economic impacts of the vetoes?

      Guettabi, Mouhcine (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 7/8/2019)
    • What are the Implications of the Fiscal Options?

      Guettabi, Mouhcine (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-10-01)
    • What Do Alaskan's with Disabilities Need?

      Hanna, Virgene (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 1991)
      More than 20,000 Alaskas - 4 percent of the state population- are disabled and live outside institutions. Most of them of getting medical care, but many lack special equipment, information, and other help they need. These are among the findings of a recent ISER survey of more than 4300 Alaska households. It is the first survey of its kind in the nation to determine how many disabled persons live on their own and what they need to continue living independently.
    • What do we know about Narcan Utilization among Alaskans? Findings from 3 years

      Porter, Rebecca; Druffel, Ryan; Hanson, Bridget (Center for Behavioral Health Research & Services, 1/22/2020)
    • What do we know about the Alaska economy and where is it heading?

      Guettabi, Mouhcine (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1/1/2017)
    • What do we know about the effects of the Alaska Permanent Fund Dividend?

      Guettabi, Mouhcine (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2019-05-20)
      The Alaska Permanent Fund Dividend (PFD) has been distributed to Alaska residents for 37 years, providing each resident an equal share of a yearly government appropriation based on the earnings of the Alaska Permanent Fund. While support for the program is high, work assessing the PFD’s influence on the lives of Alaskans is limited. Recently, a number of researchers have analyzed the causal effect of the PFD on a variety of socio-economic outcomes including employment, consumption, income inequality, health, and crime. This paper summarizes this empirical literature and highlights future areas of research.
    • What do we know about the effects of the Alaska Permanent Fund Dividend?

      Guettabi, Mouhcine (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 5/20/2019)
      The Alaska Permanent Fund Dividend (PFD) has been distributed to Alaska residents for 37 years, providing each resident an equal share of a yearly government appropriation based on the earnings of the Alaska Permanent Fund. While support for the program is high, work assessing the PFD�s influence on the lives of Alaskans is limited. Recently, a number of researchers have analyzed the causal effect of the PFD on a variety of socio-economic outcomes including employment, consumption, income inequality, health, and crime. This paper summarizes this empirical literature and highlights future areas of research.
    • What do we know and where are we heading? An Assessment of the Alaska Economy

      Guettabi, Mouhcine (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-05-11)
    • What do we know to date about the Alaska recession and the fiscal crunch?

      Guettabi, Mouhcine (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-01-01)
      We provide a broad overview of the state’s economic and fiscal conditions. We show how the economic contraction has spread away from natural resource and mining and state government to household spending dependent sectors. We also show that while the rate at which jobs are being lost has slowed, it is inaccurate to think about that as a sign of a recovery. That is because the engine of growth that is O&G employment as of June 2017 was only 75% of what it was in 2014. Additionally, the softness in spending activity may linger for an extended period of time. We also assess the regional effects of the recession and show the significant heterogeneity in experience. Unsurprisingly, areas with economic bases not associated with Oil and Gas and with relatively little dependence on state government spending are holding up best. After establishing an understanding of the economic conditions, we offer a back of the envelope calculation of the capital investment losses associated with the fiscal uncertainty. Then, we provide a comparison of Alaska’s taxes relative to the rest of the US, and a simulation of the effects of different withdrawal amounts on the permanent fund balance and the earnings reserve.