• Disproportionate Detention of Minorities: A Case Study of One State's Compliance with the Mandates of the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act

      Schafer, N. E.; Curtis, Richard W. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1996-03)
      Pursuant to Section 223(a)(23) of the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act, states must examine whether minority youth are disproportionately detained in relation to their proportion in the general population. For a preliminary assessment of Alaska’s compliance, five and a half years of detention data (1990–June 1995) for the state of Alaska are analyzed to assess the detention of minority and non-minority youth. A number of factors are used to compare racial groups: type of offense, prior record, gender, age, length of detention, etc.
    • Disproportionate Minority Contact in Anchorage

      Rosay, André B.; Everett, Ronald (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2006-06-10)
      This slide show presentation presents recently collected data on disproportionate contact with the juvenile justice system of minority youth in Anchorage, Alaska. The data examine minority contact with local law enforcement and juvenile justice authorities at McLaughlin Youth Center. Disproportionate minority contact (DMC) occurs when the rate of referral for minority youth exceeds the rate of referral for white youth. DMC occurs for almost all non-white minority groups in Anchorage; it is more prevalent for Pacific, Native, and Black youth, both males and females, and more prevalent for referrals for probation/conduct violations, especially for females.
    • Disproportionate Minority Processing of Females: A Comparison of Native, Black and White Juveniles

      Schafer, N. E. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1998-11)
      An examination of four years of statewide female juvenile referral data showed that Native girls are referred in disproportionate numbers and tend to have lengthier records. Underage drinking was one of the most frequent referral reasons. Because many of the Native females were from rural communities, the disproportionate referrals may be a factor of the smallness of the communities, in which misbehavior is more readily noticed. Examination of a subset of files for girls with multiple referrals showed that the actual behavior was often not particularly grave and that many of the girls with multiple referrals came from very unstable backgrounds.
    • Disproportionate Representation of Minorities in the Alaska Juvenile Justice System: Phase I Report

      Schafer, N. E.; Curtis, Richard; Atwell, Cassie (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1997-09)
      The disproportionate processing of minorities in the justice system has been noted with growing concern nationally as well as at the state level. In Alaska, as in other states, the primary basis for concern is that minorities are overrepresented among the adult prison population. The realization that this disproportionality appears in other justice system venues has led nationally to a number of research initiatives with a focus on the overrepresentation of juveniles. This report analyzes referral data from the Alaska Division of Family and Youth Services (DFYS) for 1992-1995 to provide a statistical overview of disproportionate minority contact in the Alaska juvenile justice system, providing comparative data for referrals of Alaska Native, African American, and white youth.
    • Dividing Alaska, 1867-2000: Changing Land Ownership and Management

      Hull, Teresa; Leask, Linda (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2000)
      When the U.S. bought Alaska in 1867, it acquired an area twice the size of the 13 original American colonies and three quarters as big as the Louisiana Purchase. This paper looks broadly at changing land ownership and management in Alaska from 1867 through today. For almost a century, the federal government gave up only a sliver of Alaska’s 375 million acres, mostly through homesteading and other land programs. But when Alaska became a state in 1959, Congress gave the new state rights to about 104 million acres. Then, in 1971, Congress settled Alaska Native land claims with a land grant of 44 million acres and payment of $1 billion. The last major division of Alaska lands came in 1980, when Congress added 104 million acres to national parks, wildlife refuges, and other conservation units.
    • A Doctoral Program in Leadership and Policy Studies: Is It Feasible?

      Killorin, Mary (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2002)
      In response to requests from the Alaskan community, the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) agreed to explore the possibility of developing a doctoral program in leadership and policy studies. This program would be developed in collaboration with the University of Alaska Anchorage (UAA) and the University of Alaska Southeast (UAS). The goal of the program would be to prepare Alaska leaders in the fields of education, health and human services, government, and business. The report is organized around the six main questions that respondents answered. Each question has a summary of responses indicated by bulleted themes followed by supporting quotations.
    • The DOD Economic Analysis of Eielson Realignment Is Seriously Flawed

      Goldsmith, Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2005)
      The DOD analysis of the economic impact on Fairbanks of the realignment of Eielson air base concludes that the net loss of 2,940 military and civilian jobs at Eielson would result in the loss of 1,770 additional jobs in the Fairbanks MSA (Fairbanks North Star Borough). This would represent a loss of 8.6% of all jobs, based on an estimate of 54,469 total jobs in the Borough. The loss of 8.6% of all jobs represents the 4th largest hit as a percentage among all 234 regions that would by effected by implementation of the BRAC recommendations. Netting out those bases recommended for closure, and thus available for redevelopment, the negative economic impact on Fairbanks would be exceeded in only one other region (Clovis, New Mexico).
    • Does Changing Ownership Change Crime? An Analysis of Apartment Ownership and Crime in Cincinnati

      Payne, Troy C. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2010-11-19)
      This Powerpoint slide presentation examines the question of changes in level of crime when ownership of an apartment building changes. Examination of data from Cincinnati, Ohio, shows that ownership change, size of apartment complex, and past crime all have some effect on crime counts. In particular, when the apartments that are sold are high-crime apartments, change in ownership tends to worsen the crime problem.
    • Does the YLS/CMI help to predict recidivism?

      Carns, Teresa W.; Martin, Stephanie (Alaska Judicial Council, 2012-08)
      In June, 2010, the Alaska Division of Juvenile Justice (Division) invited the Alaska Judicial Council and the Institute of Social and Economic Research (ISER) at University of Alaska Anchorage to assist “in understanding how scores on the Division’s assessment instrument for juveniles, the Youth Level of Service/Case Management Inventory (YLS/CMI), reflect the actual recidivism of juveniles who’ve received services from the Division.” Other states had shown that YLS/CMI scores could be helpful in predicting recidivism among the youths they served, but Alaska had not yet done the comparable research. ISER and the Council agreed that the questions proposed would provide valuable information and help the Division to better address the reasons for youth recidivism.
    • Dog Bite Health Burden in Alaska Communities, 2002-2012

      Vinnikova, Marina (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2014-08)
      Dog bite injuries and fatalities are major public health problems nationwide. Alaska dog bite hospitalization rates are consistently higher than national rates, indicating that a health disparity exists. In Alaska dog bite injuries are inconsistently recorded and are not centrally reported. The objective of this study was to characterize dog bite injuries and victims in Alaskan communities for 2002-2012. A cross sectional study design was used in this first attempt to consolidate and analyze scattered statewide data regarding dog bites. Results showed that the vast majority of dog bites in Alaska went unreported, and confirmed previous research that the Alaska Native population and children aged 0-9 were disproportionately affected. This study was intended to provide an update of this public health problem for the State of Alaska, Department of Health and Social Services, Section of Epidemiology and to improve public and stakeholder knowledge.
    • Dollars of Difference: What Affects Fuel Prices Around Alaska?

      Wilson, Meghan; Saylor, Ben; Szymoniak, Nick; Colt, Steve; Fay, Ginny (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2008-05)
      The spike in oil prices has hit rural Alaskans especially hard, because they rely mostly on fuel oil for heating. But some rural residents are paying much more than others—at times 100% more. The Alaska Energy Authority asked ISER to analyze what determines the prices rural households pay for fuel oil and gasoline. The agency hopes this research can help identify possible ways of holding down fuel prices in the future. In this summary we report only fuel oil prices, but the full report (see back page) also includes gasoline prices. We studied 10 communities that reflect, as much as possible, the forces driving fuel prices. We collected information in November 2007, and fuel prices have gone up a lot since then. Crude oil sold for $120 a barrel in mid-May, up from about $80 in fall 2007.
    • Domestic Violence in Alaska: Definitions, Rates in Alaska, Causes and Consequences

      Rivera, Marny (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2014-03-19)
      This Powerpoint slide presentation describes domestic violence in Alaska, including the definition of domestic violence; an overview of results from the Alaska Victimization Survey (AVS) for 2010–2013 for Alaska statewide, the Municipality of Anchorage, and Matanuska-Susitna Borough; comparison of AVS statewide data with national data from the CDC's National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Surveillance System (NISVS); and discussion of the causes and consequences of domestic violence.
    • Drainage Pierces ANWR in Alaska Study Scenario

      Haley, Sharman; Tussing, Arlon R. (1999)
      A hypothetical scenario of petroleum industry activities adjacent to the 1002 Area of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) suggests that development from leases under State of Alaska jurisdiction could drain reservoirs that extend under ANWR. Anticipation of such drainage might in turn trigger Congressional authorization for limited surface development of trans-boundary fields. This article provides an overview of 5 scenarios developed for an interdisciplinary study of community sustainability in the Arctic. Forty year scenarios are not offered as predictions, but as "science fiction" - stories combining the best available scientific information and a set of fictional but plausible assumptions to explore implication of a range of plausible outcomes. The final scenario hinges on assumptions about continuing trends in technology that reduce future development costs and surface impacts.
    • Drug and Alcohol-Related Workload of Anchorage Patrol Officers: Results From Two Patrol Officer Surveys

      Myrstol, Brad A.; Giblin, Matthew; Schafer, N. E. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2003-01-01)
      It is widely agreed among criminal justice professionals that alcohol and illegal drugs play a role in patterns of crime, but not much is known about how these substances influence the operation of criminal justice agencies, particularly in the area of policing. This report summarizes the findings of a study of the extent to which drug and alcohol-related incidents formed the workload of Anchorage Police Department patrol officers. The study consisted of two surveys, the first of which asked APD patrol officers to provide their best estimate of the amount of time they spent dealing with alcohol and drug-related activities, the second of which required patrol officers to complete incident logs describing drug and alcohol-related incidents encountered on patrol. The study found that officers tended to overestimate the amount of time they spent on drug or alcohol-related activities, but that the drug and alcohol-related activities nonetheless comprise a significant portion of APD patrol officers' workload.
    • Drug Cases Filed across the Alaska Court System, FY 2008–2017

      Reinhard, Daniel (Alaska Justice Information Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-08-07)
      This fact sheet presents data on drug-related court filings throughout the state of Alaska for the fiscal years (FY) 2008 through 2017 and the 10-year trend of misdemeanor and felony drug case filings for Alaska and for the Anchorage, Palmer, Kenai and Fairbanks courts over the same period. Overall, felony drug case filing rates remained stable or increased in all locations until FY15 or FY16, before decreasing dramatically from FY16 to FY17. The exception is the Fairbanks court, which maintained an overall decrease in felony drug case filing rates over the 10-year period. Misdemeanor drug case filing rates, regardless of whether they increased or decreased between FY 2008–2014, decreased in all locations from FY 2014–2016 before increasing from FY 2016–2017. The year with the lowest felony drug case filing rate, for all locations, was in FY17. The lowest misdemeanor drug case filing rate, for all locations, was in FY16. Data is drawn from annual reports of the Alaska Court System for the FY 2008 through 2017.
    • Drug Possession Arrests Reported in Alaska, 1986–2017

      Ervin, Benjamin (Alaska Justice Information Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-09-10)
      This fact sheet presents data on drug sale possession arrests reported by Alaska law enforcement agencies for the 32-year period 1986 to 2017. Overall, the drug possession arrest rate plateaued be-tween 1998 and 2010, consistently declined from 2010 to 2016, and slightly increased in 2017. The lowest recorded overall drug possession arrest rate was in 1990. Rates increased from 1986 through 1998, then de-clined for all populations from 2010 to 2016. The adult and male populations drive the overall trend in arrest rates, accounting for roughly four out of every five arrestees during this 32-year period. The trend shows less discrepancy in arrest rates be-tween males and females, as well as between adults and juveniles after 2010. Data is drawn from the annual Crime in Alaska report of the Alaska Department of Public Safety, which represents the State of Alaska's contribution to the FBI's Uniform Crime Reports (UCR) program.
    • Drug Possession Arrests Reported in Alaska, 1986–2017 — Drug Types by Sex

      Ervin, Benjamin (Alaska Justice Information Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-12-19)
      This fact sheet presents data on drug possession arrests by type of drug and sex of arrestee as reported by Alaska law enforcement agencies for the 32-year period 1986 to 2017. Types of drugs include narcotics, synthetic narcotics, marijuana, and other non-narcotic drugs. Overall, males comprise roughly four out of five drug possession arrests in the state of Alaska. The female and male rates parallel one another in that they rise and fall at the same points in most years. In 2002, the synthetic narcotics and other non-narcotics possession arrest rates sharply increased for both males and females until the mid-2000s before a sharp decline and subsequent increase. Marijuana possession, the offense with the highest arrest rates, peaked at 90.4 per 100,000 female residents and 324.9 per 100,000 male residents. Synthetic narcotics possession, the offense with the lowest arrest rates, peaked at 13.8 per 100,000 female residents and 29.8 per 100,000 male residents. Narcotics possession is the only offense that peaked before 2000. Data is drawn from the annual Crime in Alaska report of the Alaska Department of Public Safety, which represents the State of Alaska's contribution to the FBI's Uniform Crime Reports (UCR) program.
    • Drug Sale and Manufacture Arrests Reported in Alaska, 1986–2017

      Ervin, Benjamin (Alaska Justice Information Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-09-10)
      This fact sheet presents data on drug sale and manufacture arrests reported by Alaska law enforcement agencies for the 32-year period 1986 to 2017. Overall, the drug sale and manufacture arrest rate consistently declined between 1997 and 2017. The lowest recorded overall drug sale and manufacture arrest rate was in 2017. While drug sale and manufacture arrest rates for females and juveniles were relatively stable, arrest rates for males and adults showed a pronounced decrease. Data is drawn from the annual Crime in Alaska report of the Alaska Department of Public Safety, which represents the State of Alaska's contribution to the FBI's Uniform Crime Reports (UCR) program.
    • Drug Sale and Manufacture Arrests Reported in Alaska, 1986–2017 — Drug Types by Sex

      Ervin, Benjamin (Alaska Justice Information Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-12-19)
      This fact sheet presents data on drug sale and manufacture arrests by type of drug and sex of arrestee as reported by Alaska law enforcement agencies for the 32-year period 1986 to 2017. Types of drugs include narcotics, synthetic narcotics, marijuana, and other non-narcotic drugs. Overall, males comprise roughly three-fourths of the total drug sale and manufacture arrests in the state of Alaska. The female and male rates parallel one another in that they rise and fall at the same points in most years. For all drugs, the difference between female and male arrest rates in 2017 are smaller than in 1986. Data is drawn from the annual Crime in Alaska report of the Alaska Department of Public Safety, which represents the State of Alaska's contribution to the FBI's Uniform Crime Reports (UCR) program.
    • Drugs and Crime in Anchorage, Alaska: A Note

      Langworthy, Robert H.; McKelvie, Alan R. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2005-05-20)
      This research note examines the relationship between drug use and offense charged through data collected in 2003 from 259 recent arrestees in Anchorage, Alaska using the Arrestee Drug Abuse Monitoring (ADAM) protocol. The analysis is restricted to examining those ADAM participants who tested positive for marijuana and cocaine use.