• FASD Costs: Evidence from Hawaii Medicaid Data

      Hanson, Bridget; Porter, Rebecca; Guettabi, Mouhcine (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2019)
      Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs), a collection of permanent yet preventable developmental disabilities and birth defects resulting from prenatal alcohol exposure, are associated with substantial costs. We use information from Hawaii Medicaid data for individuals who have at least one FASD-related condition. The total spending for these individuals between 2011 and 2015 was $460,515,584. Of that total, more than $32 million is directly associated with FASD-related visits/codes. We find that the average FASD-related visit costs $121, which is more expensive than the average medicaid visit. We also find that the frequency of FASD-related visits increases with age. We find evidence that the number of initial conditions is positively associated with the number of visits and accumulated medical costs and that 20% of the patients are responsible for 85.85% of the total spending. This paper was supported by the United States Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Cooperative Agreement 5NU01DD001143.
    • Fate Control and Human Rights: The Policies and Practices of Local Governance in America's Arctic

      Kimmel, Mara (Duke University School of Law, 2014-12-01)
      The loss of territoriality over lands conveyed under the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act had adverse impacts for Alaskan tribal governance. Despite policy frameworks that emphasize the value of local governance at an international, regional, and statewide level, Alaskan tribes face unique obstacles to exercising their authority, with consequences for both human development and human rights. This Article examines how territoriality was lost and analyzes the four major effects of this loss on tribal governance. It then describes two distinct but complimentary strategies to rebuilding tribal governance authority that rely on both territorial and non-territorial authority.
    • Feasibility Analysis of the Service Design for the Geotourism Program in the Lake Camp Area of Alaska

      Paulus, Peggy D. (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-05-01)
      Alaska, in all its majestic and awe inspiring beauty, has an abundance of culture, wildlife and scenery to offer to residents and non-residents. Tourism is a vital contributor to the economic benefit to the State of Alaska. Many of the existing tour programs, although contribute to the local economy, do not facilitate rural community growth or support. There is much untapped potential for tourism programs in rural communities that can be beneficial to the local communities while preserving the cultural, natural and geographical wonders. This report is a feasibility analysis for a geotourism program in the Camp Lake area of Southwest Alaska. This report demonstrates the possible sustainability of a service concept for such a geotourism program.
    • The Feasibility of Adopting an Evidence-Informed Tailored Exercise Program within Adult Day Services: The Enhance Mobility Program.

      King, Diane; Faulkner, S.A.; Hanson, Bridget (Taylor & Francis Group, 11/29/2017)
      This article uses the RE-AIM framework to evaluate the feasibility of implementing Enhance Mobility (EM), a tailored, evidence-informed group exercise and walking program for older adults with dementia, into an adult day services center. Participant physical performance outcomes were measured at baseline and 8 months. Program staff were interviewed to understand implementation challenges. Participant outcomes did not change significantly, though gait speed improved from limited to community ambulation levels. Implementation challenges included space reallocation and adequate staffing. Adopting EM in adult day services is feasible, and has potential to reach older adults who could benefit from tailored exercise.
    • Feasibility of Thermosyphons to Impede the Progress of Coastal Permafrost Erosion Along the Norther Coastline of Alaska

      Zottola, Jason (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-05-01)
      This study seeks to investigate the feasibility of installing thermosyphons at Drew Point, Alaska to mitigate thermally-induced coastline erosion. Portions of the northern Alaska coastline have been receding at increasing rates and putting in peril infrastructure, environmental habitats, and small villages. Slowing or eliminating the erosion would prevent emotional village relocations and costly infrastructure maintenance and relocations. Climate and soil data from Drew Point and Barrow, Alaska are used as input variables in a numerical modeling software program to determine accurate soil thermal properties to be used in a thermosyphon design. Generalized cost considerations are presented and it is determined that thermosyphons may be an effective mitigation strategy to combat coastal erosion, however, future additional modeling could optimize a design and provide for refinements in the cost analysis.
    • Federal Spending and Revenues in Alaska

      Larson, Eric; Goldsmith, Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2003)
      This report describes the flows of federal money in and out of Alaska. The report focuses on the period from 1983 through 2002 to identify patterns and changes in federal spending in the state. The report identifies the major components, departments, programs, and types of federal spending in Alaska and describes how each has changed over time. This analysis provides the basis for understanding the significant role the federal government has played in the Alaska economy
    • Federal Spending in Alaska (Presentation)

      Goldsmith, Scott; Larson, Eric (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2003)
      This presentation is a part of the Understanding Alaska research series. It includes charts and other graphical information on federal spending in Alaska. Key points include defense spending and procurment, civilian industry spending and procurement, and direct payments to individuals (social security, federal retirement, medicare, housing assistance and veterans benefits). This material was presented at the conference on “Improving Delivery of Federal Funding for Alaska Tribal Programs,” May, 5-6, 2003, Anchorage, Alaska
    • Federal Spending in Alaska: Running Out of Steam?

      Goldsmith, Oliver Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2012-05)
      After nearly a decade of explosive growth, federal spending in Alaska has turned flat, except for the temporary boost from the stimulus package—the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act—that pumped more than $2.2 billion into the state economy in 2009 and 2010. (Shown in black in the figure below.) Total federal spending in Alaska was $11.2 billion in 2009 and $10.9 billion in 2010, compared with about $9.4 billion in 2008. But without the stimulus funds, federal spending in 2009 and 2010 would have been no higher than in the previous four years. Alaska was first among the states in per capita stimulus funds, with more than $3,000 per capita, or nearly four times the national average. Spending is no longer growing for either defense or grants—the largest categories of federal dollars coming into the state. Still, the special characteristics that have historically kept Alaska near the top of the state rankings for federal funds per capita will continue to guarantee a strong role for federal dollars in the economy. Here we discuss the composition of federal spending in Alaska, comparing it with spending in other states, and also review stimulus spending and provide examples of the importance of federal funds to particular sectors of the state economy. In an appendix, we correct a serious reporting error in data from the U.S. Department of Commerce on federal spending in Alaska. Because of the difficulties in sorting out temporary stimulus spending in 2009 and 2010—and because of errors in federal data for those years—2008 spending provides the best picture of recent federal spending in Alaska.
    • Felony Definition: A White Paper

      Rieger, Lisa (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 1991-02-01)
      As part of a larger project to improve the quality and timeliness of Alaska criminal history records, the Alaska Department of Public Safety intends to upgrade the Alaska Public Safety Information Network (APSIN) to provide an indicator to show whether a conviction is for a felony or a misdemeanor. This white paper presents an operational definition of felony which accommodates the limits of APSIN by referring to data fields currently available and makes recommendations to alleviate ambiguity about the category of offense for convictions which can be either felony or misdemeanor.
    • The 'Female' in Indigenous and Pre-Socratic Cultures

      Hanson, Kristin Helweg; Olsson, Wolfgang Q.; Mason, Rachel; Rahm, Jacqueline Marie (University of Alaska Anchorage. Bookstore, 2015-08-24)
      Guest speakers include: Jacqueline Rahm, Ph.D. (UAF Department of Indigenous Studies); Rachel Mason, Ph.D. (UAA Department of Anthropology and National Park Service); Kristin Helweg Hanson, Ph.D. (UAA Department of Philosophy); and Wolfgang Olsson (UAA alumnus, B.A. with honors in English '16). Topics covered include: The search for the feminine in pre-Socratic society and places of possible intersection with indigenous philosophies; the importance of Aspasia; changing understandings of female hunter-gatherer and why the "female" has been suppressed and/or discarded over the years.
    • Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders: Competency I - Foundation

      UAA Center for Behavioral Health Research & Servcies (University of Alaska Anchorage Center for Behavioral Health Research & Services, 2015-01-01)
      This PowerPoint was created by the University of Alaska Anchorage Center for Behavioral Health Research & Services’ CDC-funded Arctic FASD Regional Training Center in 2010 and revised in 2013. The content is based primarily on materials and resources available in CDC’s Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders Competency-Based Curriculum Development Guide for Medical and Allied Health Education and Practice (2009). This guide was revised in 2015 and is available from www.frfasd.org/Comp_Guide.html. If you are using elements of this PowerPoint in another presentation, please credit the Arctic FASD Regional Training Center and the 2009 Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders Competency-Based Curriculum Development Guide for Medical and Allied Health Education and Practice. Questions about this PowerPoint or its contents should be addressed to the Center for Behavioral Health Research & Services at the University of Alaska Anchorage – www.uaa.alaska.edu.
    • Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders: Competency II - Screening and Brief Interventions for Alcohol Use

      UAA Center for Behavioral Health Research & Servcies (University of Alaska Anchorage Center for Behavioral Health Research & Services, 2015-01-01)
      This PowerPoint was created by the University of Alaska Anchorage Center for Behavioral Health Research & Services’ CDC-funded Arctic FASD Regional Training Center in 2010 and revised in 2013. The content is based primarily on materials and resources available in CDC’s Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders Competency-Based Curriculum Development Guide for Medical and Allied Health Education and Practice (2009). This guide was revised in 2015 and is available from www.frfasd.org/Comp_Guide.html. If you are using elements of this PowerPoint in another presentation, please credit the Arctic FASD Regional Training Center and the 2009 Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders Competency-Based Curriculum Development Guide for Medical and Allied Health Education and Practice. Questions about this PowerPoint or its contents should be addressed to the Center for Behavioral Health Research & Services at the University of Alaska Anchorage – www.uaa.alaska.edu.
    • Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders: Competency III - Models of Addiction

      UAA Center for Behavioral Health Research & Servcies (2015-01-01)
      This PowerPoint was created by the University of Alaska Anchorage Center for Behavioral Health Research & Services’ CDC-funded Arctic FASD Regional Training Center in 2010 and revised in 2013. The content is based primarily on materials and resources available in CDC’s Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders Competency-Based Curriculum Development Guide for Medical and Allied Health Education and Practice (2009). This guide was revised in 2015 and is available from www.frfasd.org/Comp_Guide.html. If you are using elements of this PowerPoint in another presentation, please credit the Arctic FASD Regional Training Center and the 2009 Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders Competency-Based Curriculum Development Guide for Medical and Allied Health Education and Practice. Questions about this PowerPoint or its contents should be addressed to the Center for Behavioral Health Research & Services at the University of Alaska Anchorage – www.uaa.alaska.edu.
    • Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders: Competency IV - Biological Effects on the Fetus

      UAA Center for Behavioral Health Research & Servcies (University of Alaska Anchorage Center for Behavioral Health Research & Services, 2015-01-01)
      This PowerPoint was created by the University of Alaska Anchorage Center for Behavioral Health Research & Services’ CDC-funded Arctic FASD Regional Training Center in 2010 and revised in 2013. The content is based primarily on materials and resources available in CDC’s Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders Competency-Based Curriculum Development Guide for Medical and Allied Health Education and Practice (2009). This guide was revised in 2015 and is available from www.frfasd.org/Comp_Guide.html. If you are using elements of this PowerPoint in another presentation, please credit the Arctic FASD Regional Training Center and the 2009 Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders Competency-Based Curriculum Development Guide for Medical and Allied Health Education and Practice. Questions about this PowerPoint or its contents should be addressed to the Center for Behavioral Health Research & Services at the University of Alaska Anchorage – www.uaa.alaska.edu.
    • Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders: Competency V - Screening, Assessment, and Diagnosis

      UAA Center for Behavioral Health Research & Servcies (University of Alaska Anchorage Center for Behavioral Health Research & Services, 2015-01-01)
      This PowerPoint was created by the University of Alaska Anchorage Center for Behavioral Health Research & Services’ CDC-funded Arctic FASD Regional Training Center in 2010 and revised in 2013. The content is based primarily on materials and resources available in CDC’s Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders Competency-Based Curriculum Development Guide for Medical and Allied Health Education and Practice (2009). This guide was revised in 2015 and is available from www.frfasd.org/Comp_Guide.html. If you are using elements of this PowerPoint in another presentation, please credit the Arctic FASD Regional Training Center and the 2009 Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders Competency-Based Curriculum Development Guide for Medical and Allied Health Education and Practice. Questions about this PowerPoint or its contents should be addressed to the Center for Behavioral Health Research & Services at the University of Alaska Anchorage – www.uaa.alaska.edu.
    • Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders: Competency VI - Treatment Across the Life Span

      UAA Center for Behavioral Health Research & Servcies (University of Alaska Anchorage Center for Behavioral Health Research & Services, 2015-01-01)
      This PowerPoint was created by the University of Alaska Anchorage Center for Behavioral Health Research & Services’ CDC-funded Arctic FASD Regional Training Center in 2010 and revised in 2013. The content is based primarily on materials and resources available in CDC’s Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders Competency-Based Curriculum Development Guide for Medical and Allied Health Education and Practice (2009). This guide was revised in 2015 and is available from www.frfasd.org/Comp_Guide.html. If you are using elements of this PowerPoint in another presentation, please credit the Arctic FASD Regional Training Center and the 2009 Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders Competency-Based Curriculum Development Guide for Medical and Allied Health Education and Practice. Questions about this PowerPoint or its contents should be addressed to the Center for Behavioral Health Research & Services at the University of Alaska Anchorage – www.uaa.alaska.edu.
    • Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders: Competency VII - Ethical, Legal, and Policy Issues

      UAA Center for Behavioral Health Research & Servcies (University of Alaska Anchorage Center for Behavioral Health Research & Services, 2015-01-01)
      This PowerPoint was created by the University of Alaska Anchorage Center for Behavioral Health Research & Services’ CDC-funded Arctic FASD Regional Training Center in 2010 and revised in 2013. The content is based primarily on materials and resources available in CDC’s Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders Competency-Based Curriculum Development Guide for Medical and Allied Health Education and Practice (2009). This guide was revised in 2015 and is available from www.frfasd.org/Comp_Guide.html. If you are using elements of this PowerPoint in another presentation, please credit the Arctic FASD Regional Training Center and the 2009 Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders Competency-Based Curriculum Development Guide for Medical and Allied Health Education and Practice. Questions about this PowerPoint or its contents should be addressed to the Center for Behavioral Health Research & Services at the University of Alaska Anchorage – www.uaa.alaska.edu.
    • Fifty Miles from Tomorrow: a Memoir of Alaska and the Real People

      Hensley, Willie (University of Alaska Anchorage. Bookstore, 2009-02-06)
      Willie L. Iggiagruk Hensley presents: Fifty Miles from Tomorrow: a Memoir of Alaska and the Real People, his memoir accompanied with a personal photo journey.
    • Final Report: Alaska Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner Study

      Rosay, André B.; Henry, Tara; Providence Kodiak Island Medical Center; Yukon-Kuskokwim Health Corporation; Central Peninsula General Hospital; Norton Sound Health Corporation; Fairbanks Memorial Hospital; South Peninsula Hospital; Maniilaq Association; The Department of Health and Human Services (Municipality of Anchorage); et al. (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2008-10-01)
      This project examined the characteristics of sexual assault victimizations in Alaska, as observed and recorded by sexual assault nurse examiners in Anchorage, Kodiak, Bethel, Soldotna, Nome, Fairbanks, Homer, and Kotzebue. The sample utilized for this study includes all sexual assault nurse examinations conducted in Anchorage from 1996 to 2004, in Bethel and Fairbanks in 2005 and 2006, and in Homer, Kodiak, Kotzebue, Nome, and Soldotna in 2005 (N = 1,699). This final report provides a thorough descriptive analysis of the sexual assault nurse examinations included in this study. This descriptive analysis focuses on demographic characteristics of patients; pre-assault, assault, and post-assault characteristics; exam characteristics and findings; suspect characteristics; and legal resolutions. The report then examines the predictors of genital injury. More specifically, it examines the effect of time elapsed from assault to report and of patient condition at the time of the assault. The effect of time elapsed from assault to report is examined by comparing the genital injuries of patients that reported to a sexual assault nurse examiner within 24 hours to the genital injuries of patients that did not. The effect of patient condition at the time of the assault is examined by comparing the genital injuries of patients that were sober, intoxicated, and incapacitated at the time of the assault. Results show that neither time elapsed from assault to report nor patient condition at the time of the assault impacted genital injury. The report also examines the effect of genital injury on legal resolutions. More specifically, it examines how the presence and frequency of genital injury impacts the likelihood that cases are referred for prosecution, the likelihood that cases are accepted by prosecutors, and the likelihood that cases result in a conviction. Results show that genital injury did not impact legal resolutions. Other factors, non-genital injury in particular, were significantly associated with both genital injury and legal resolutions. The relevance of these additional factors is discussed
    • Final Report: Anchorage Disproportionate Minority Contact Study

      Rosay, André B.; Everett, Ronald S.; Hurr, William (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2010-10-01)
      This project examined disproportionate minority contact in Anchorage, Alaska. It was designed to provide a more nuanced understanding of disproportionate minority contact at the referral stage (when law enforcement officers refer youth to the Alaska Division of Juvenile Justice). To do so, we relied on community involvement and utilized different statistical techniques to examine the geography and development of disproportionate minority contact. Researchers partnered with practitioners from the Anchorage Disproportionate Minority Contact Initiative to structure the research process and to interpret and disseminate results. Geographic analyses were conducted to examine where the highest levels of disproportionate minority contact were occurring and longitudinal analyses were conducted to examine at what age disproportionate minority contact began. These analyses provided an understanding of disproportionate minority contact that was obscured when examining relative rate indices. Geographic analyses, for example, revealed high levels of disproportionate minority contact for Pacific youth (a group that would have traditionally been ignored because of its ‘small population’). Longitudinal analyses revealed that disproportionate minority contact began at age 13. Although relative rate indices are useful to identify broad patterns in disproportionate minority contact, they are less useful to drive action. We overcame this limitation with strong community partnerships and different statistical methods for disproportionate minority contact research. In the end, practitioners and researchers used data and research to develop strategic plans to reduce disproportionate minority contact.