• Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders: Competency III - Models of Addiction

      UAA Center for Behavioral Health Research & Servcies (2015-01-01)
      This PowerPoint was created by the University of Alaska Anchorage Center for Behavioral Health Research & Services’ CDC-funded Arctic FASD Regional Training Center in 2010 and revised in 2013. The content is based primarily on materials and resources available in CDC’s Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders Competency-Based Curriculum Development Guide for Medical and Allied Health Education and Practice (2009). This guide was revised in 2015 and is available from www.frfasd.org/Comp_Guide.html. If you are using elements of this PowerPoint in another presentation, please credit the Arctic FASD Regional Training Center and the 2009 Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders Competency-Based Curriculum Development Guide for Medical and Allied Health Education and Practice. Questions about this PowerPoint or its contents should be addressed to the Center for Behavioral Health Research & Services at the University of Alaska Anchorage – www.uaa.alaska.edu.
    • Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders: Competency IV - Biological Effects on the Fetus

      UAA Center for Behavioral Health Research & Servcies (University of Alaska Anchorage Center for Behavioral Health Research & Services, 2015-01-01)
      This PowerPoint was created by the University of Alaska Anchorage Center for Behavioral Health Research & Services’ CDC-funded Arctic FASD Regional Training Center in 2010 and revised in 2013. The content is based primarily on materials and resources available in CDC’s Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders Competency-Based Curriculum Development Guide for Medical and Allied Health Education and Practice (2009). This guide was revised in 2015 and is available from www.frfasd.org/Comp_Guide.html. If you are using elements of this PowerPoint in another presentation, please credit the Arctic FASD Regional Training Center and the 2009 Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders Competency-Based Curriculum Development Guide for Medical and Allied Health Education and Practice. Questions about this PowerPoint or its contents should be addressed to the Center for Behavioral Health Research & Services at the University of Alaska Anchorage – www.uaa.alaska.edu.
    • Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders: Competency V - Screening, Assessment, and Diagnosis

      UAA Center for Behavioral Health Research & Servcies (University of Alaska Anchorage Center for Behavioral Health Research & Services, 2015-01-01)
      This PowerPoint was created by the University of Alaska Anchorage Center for Behavioral Health Research & Services’ CDC-funded Arctic FASD Regional Training Center in 2010 and revised in 2013. The content is based primarily on materials and resources available in CDC’s Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders Competency-Based Curriculum Development Guide for Medical and Allied Health Education and Practice (2009). This guide was revised in 2015 and is available from www.frfasd.org/Comp_Guide.html. If you are using elements of this PowerPoint in another presentation, please credit the Arctic FASD Regional Training Center and the 2009 Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders Competency-Based Curriculum Development Guide for Medical and Allied Health Education and Practice. Questions about this PowerPoint or its contents should be addressed to the Center for Behavioral Health Research & Services at the University of Alaska Anchorage – www.uaa.alaska.edu.
    • Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders: Competency VI - Treatment Across the Life Span

      UAA Center for Behavioral Health Research & Servcies (University of Alaska Anchorage Center for Behavioral Health Research & Services, 2015-01-01)
      This PowerPoint was created by the University of Alaska Anchorage Center for Behavioral Health Research & Services’ CDC-funded Arctic FASD Regional Training Center in 2010 and revised in 2013. The content is based primarily on materials and resources available in CDC’s Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders Competency-Based Curriculum Development Guide for Medical and Allied Health Education and Practice (2009). This guide was revised in 2015 and is available from www.frfasd.org/Comp_Guide.html. If you are using elements of this PowerPoint in another presentation, please credit the Arctic FASD Regional Training Center and the 2009 Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders Competency-Based Curriculum Development Guide for Medical and Allied Health Education and Practice. Questions about this PowerPoint or its contents should be addressed to the Center for Behavioral Health Research & Services at the University of Alaska Anchorage – www.uaa.alaska.edu.
    • Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders: Competency VII - Ethical, Legal, and Policy Issues

      UAA Center for Behavioral Health Research & Servcies (University of Alaska Anchorage Center for Behavioral Health Research & Services, 2015-01-01)
      This PowerPoint was created by the University of Alaska Anchorage Center for Behavioral Health Research & Services’ CDC-funded Arctic FASD Regional Training Center in 2010 and revised in 2013. The content is based primarily on materials and resources available in CDC’s Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders Competency-Based Curriculum Development Guide for Medical and Allied Health Education and Practice (2009). This guide was revised in 2015 and is available from www.frfasd.org/Comp_Guide.html. If you are using elements of this PowerPoint in another presentation, please credit the Arctic FASD Regional Training Center and the 2009 Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders Competency-Based Curriculum Development Guide for Medical and Allied Health Education and Practice. Questions about this PowerPoint or its contents should be addressed to the Center for Behavioral Health Research & Services at the University of Alaska Anchorage – www.uaa.alaska.edu.
    • Fifty Miles from Tomorrow: a Memoir of Alaska and the Real People

      Hensley, Willie (University of Alaska Anchorage. Bookstore, 2009-02-06)
      Willie L. Iggiagruk Hensley presents: Fifty Miles from Tomorrow: a Memoir of Alaska and the Real People, his memoir accompanied with a personal photo journey.
    • Final Report: Alaska Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner Study

      Rosay, André B.; Henry, Tara; Providence Kodiak Island Medical Center; Yukon-Kuskokwim Health Corporation; Central Peninsula General Hospital; Norton Sound Health Corporation; Fairbanks Memorial Hospital; South Peninsula Hospital; Maniilaq Association; The Department of Health and Human Services (Municipality of Anchorage); et al. (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2008-10-01)
      This project examined the characteristics of sexual assault victimizations in Alaska, as observed and recorded by sexual assault nurse examiners in Anchorage, Kodiak, Bethel, Soldotna, Nome, Fairbanks, Homer, and Kotzebue. The sample utilized for this study includes all sexual assault nurse examinations conducted in Anchorage from 1996 to 2004, in Bethel and Fairbanks in 2005 and 2006, and in Homer, Kodiak, Kotzebue, Nome, and Soldotna in 2005 (N = 1,699). This final report provides a thorough descriptive analysis of the sexual assault nurse examinations included in this study. This descriptive analysis focuses on demographic characteristics of patients; pre-assault, assault, and post-assault characteristics; exam characteristics and findings; suspect characteristics; and legal resolutions. The report then examines the predictors of genital injury. More specifically, it examines the effect of time elapsed from assault to report and of patient condition at the time of the assault. The effect of time elapsed from assault to report is examined by comparing the genital injuries of patients that reported to a sexual assault nurse examiner within 24 hours to the genital injuries of patients that did not. The effect of patient condition at the time of the assault is examined by comparing the genital injuries of patients that were sober, intoxicated, and incapacitated at the time of the assault. Results show that neither time elapsed from assault to report nor patient condition at the time of the assault impacted genital injury. The report also examines the effect of genital injury on legal resolutions. More specifically, it examines how the presence and frequency of genital injury impacts the likelihood that cases are referred for prosecution, the likelihood that cases are accepted by prosecutors, and the likelihood that cases result in a conviction. Results show that genital injury did not impact legal resolutions. Other factors, non-genital injury in particular, were significantly associated with both genital injury and legal resolutions. The relevance of these additional factors is discussed
    • Final Report: Anchorage Disproportionate Minority Contact Study

      Rosay, André B.; Everett, Ronald S.; Hurr, William (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2010-10-01)
      This project examined disproportionate minority contact in Anchorage, Alaska. It was designed to provide a more nuanced understanding of disproportionate minority contact at the referral stage (when law enforcement officers refer youth to the Alaska Division of Juvenile Justice). To do so, we relied on community involvement and utilized different statistical techniques to examine the geography and development of disproportionate minority contact. Researchers partnered with practitioners from the Anchorage Disproportionate Minority Contact Initiative to structure the research process and to interpret and disseminate results. Geographic analyses were conducted to examine where the highest levels of disproportionate minority contact were occurring and longitudinal analyses were conducted to examine at what age disproportionate minority contact began. These analyses provided an understanding of disproportionate minority contact that was obscured when examining relative rate indices. Geographic analyses, for example, revealed high levels of disproportionate minority contact for Pacific youth (a group that would have traditionally been ignored because of its ‘small population’). Longitudinal analyses revealed that disproportionate minority contact began at age 13. Although relative rate indices are useful to identify broad patterns in disproportionate minority contact, they are less useful to drive action. We overcame this limitation with strong community partnerships and different statistical methods for disproportionate minority contact research. In the end, practitioners and researchers used data and research to develop strategic plans to reduce disproportionate minority contact.
    • Financial Performance of Alaska Native Regional Corporations

      Colt, Steve (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 1991)
      This edition of the Alaska Review of Social and Economic Conditions examines one narrow measure of how well Alaska Native Corporations have done in managing nearly 1 billion dollars and 44 million acres for the benefit of their shareholders. It describes the financial performance of the regional corporations from their beginnings in 1973 through 1990. We also report available information on shareholder employment. The endowment of natural resources in each region explains a lot about the relative financial success of the corporations: some regions just have more marketable resources than others. But aside from the differences attributable to random resource distribution, we can make several points about the corporations' cumulative financial performance over this period.
    • Financing Water and Sewer Operation and Maintenance in Rural Alaska

      Haley, Sharman (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2000)
      Are existing sanitation systems simply too expensive for many Alaska villages? Or could small utilities operate in the black if they increased their charges and toughened collection policies? How much difference do village leadership and commitment to good sanitation make? Could alternative technologies provide adequate sanitation for less? To help shed some light on these questions, the Institute of Social and Economic Research (ISER) at the University of Alaska Anchorage prepared this volume. It presents seven recent analyses, by various authors, of some aspects of financing water and sewer operations and maintenance in rural Alaska. We added an introductory chapter, a final chapter drawing some conclusions from the various analyses and discussing policy issues, and an executive summary. The analyses look at methods villages use to pay for O&M; the share of small sanitation systems operating in the red; the costs of selected closed-haul systems (one alternative to piped systems); the fiscal capacity of small rural communities; and steps that might help small sanitation systems meet their costs. These studies are not comprehensive, and in some cases they raise as many questions as they answer. But they provide valuable information on a public policy issue Alaska will continue to grapple with for the foreseeable future.
    • Finland v. the USA: Imprisonment Responses to Crime

      Endell, Roger V. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1981-10-20)
      This manuscript, prepared as a chapter for a prospective book on corrections and punishment in the Scandinavian/Nordic nations of northern Europe, compares Finland with the United States with respect to the imprisonment response to crime, correctional policies, and correctional populations.
    • Fire Island Feasibility Study: Summary Report — Final Report

      UAA School of Justice; UAA School of Engineering (School of Justice and School of Engineering, University of Alaska, Anchorage, 1986-12-18)
      This document summarizes the findings the Fire Island Prison Feasibility Study, undertaken to assess the feasibility of locating a correctional facility on Fire Island in the Municipality of Anchorage. The three reports summarized here covered the three major phases of the study: (1) an assessment of future bed space needs of the Alaska Department of Corrections; (2) an evaluation of the physical site and cost estimates for prison construction and operation; and (3) a public opinion survey and open discussion.
    • Fire Island Public Opinion Survey: Summary of Findings

      Barnes, Allan R. (School of Justice, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1986-12-04)
      Under the terms of a contract between the Alaska Department of Corrections and the University of Alaska, Anchorage, to determine the feasibility of placing a prison on Fire Island, the UAA School of Justice in November 1986 conducted a public opinion telephone survey of a random sample of one thousand residents of the Municipality of Anchorage and the Matanuska-Susitna Borough. Results indicated that respondents favored spending money to prevent and deter crime rather than to punish prisoners or to build additional prisons. When informed about the increased cost of construction and operation of a prison on Fire Island in comparison with other potential sites in Southcentral Alaska, they did not favor building a prison on Fire Island. However, in deciding the appropriate location for a new prison, cost of construction was not deemed as important as either the impact of the prison on the local economy or the costs associated with everyday operations and programs of the new prison.
    • Firearm Use in Violent Crime in the U.S. and Alaska, 1980-2011

      Myrstol, Brad A. (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2012-01-01)
      This fact sheet presents national and statewide statistics from the FBI's Uniform Crime Reports program on the prevalence of murder in the U.S. and Alaska from 1980 to 2011, as well as data on the use of firearms in murders (both for the U.S. as a whole, and Alaska), aggravated assaults (Alaska only), and robberies (Alaska only) over the same period.
    • Firearm Use in Violent Crime in the U.S. and Alaska, 1985-2012

      Parker, Khristy; Armstrong, Barbara (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2013-11-01)
      This fact sheet presents national and statewide statistics from the FBI's Uniform Crime Reports program on the use of firearms in the commission of three violent crimes — homicide (murder and nonnegligent homicide), robbery, and aggravated assault — in the U.S. and Alaska from 1985 to 2012. Data on the use of knives and other cutting instruments, strong-arm tactics, and other weapons in the commission of these crimes are also presented.
    • The First 50 Years and the Next: ISER and Alaska's Future

      Hudson, Heather E. (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska, 2011)
      This presentation provides an overview of the work and history of the Institute of Social and Economic Research.
    • The First 50 Years and the Next: ISER and Rural Alaska

      Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2011-03)
      Since 1961… ISER has been enhancing “the well-being of Alaskans and others, through nonpartisan research that helps people understand social and economic systems and supports informed public and private decision-making.” (ISER Mission Statement)
    • The First Year of the Alaska IFQ Program: Survey Reports

      Knapp, Gunnar; Hull, Dan (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 1996)
      These three reports present the results of a mail survey conducted in the spring of 1996 by the University of Alaska Anchorage Institute of Social and Economic Research (ISER). The purpose of the surveys was to gather information on changes during the first year of the Individual Fishing Quota program. The survey was funded by the Alaska Department of Commerce and Economic Development, and the Alaska Department of Fish and Game. The report represents a start towards understanding the effects of the IFQ program. More detailed research over a period of years will be needed before the full effects of the program can be understood. The first report details findings from surveys of registered buyers of halibut and sablefish. Major findings include variation in effects on fish processing regardless of the size of the operation. The second report details findings from surveys of halibut quota shareholders. Major findings include the information that IFQ holders were choosing to fish together with more than one IFQ holder on board a fishing vessel. The third report details findings from surveys of sablefish quota shareholders. Again, the findings indicate that IFQ holders were choosing to fish together with more than one IFQ holder on board a fishing vessel.
    • Fiscal and Economic Analysis of Homer Town Square Proposed Development Alternatives

      Colt, Steve (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2003)
      This report presents a fiscal and economic analysis of potential development within the Homer Town Square area. We first consider current land use patterns and tax revenues. We then estimate the fiscal and economic effects of a development scenario provided by Christopher Beck and Associates. Fiscal effects are measured by property and sales tax revenue. Economic effects are measured by employment within Homer. Finally, we report empirical results from a broad national sample of similar efforts to promote economic development and quality of life through improvements to downtown areas and commercial centers. The “existing trends” scenario attempts to account for trends and events that are likely occur in the absence of specific new development initiatives in the study area. The “town square” scenario accounts for changes that will happen with the focused development of a town square development initiative. The difference between the two scenarios in a variable of interest – such as property taxes -- is the effect that we can reasonably attribute to the town square development itself. Commercial taxable sales within the study area increase over 5 years to become about 50% higher in 2008 under the town square scenario, yielding about $1.2 million in additional sales tax revenue to Homer and an additional $680,000 of additional sales tax revenue to the Kenai Peninsula Borough. Property taxes from the study area increase by 2008 to a level 35% higher than under existing trends, yielding an additional $79,000 in property tax revenue to the city and an additional $133,000 in property tax revenues to the borough, college, and hospital.
    • Fiscal and Socio-economic Impact of Marginal Oil Field Development in Alaska: Does It Pay Its Own Way?

      Goldsmith, Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 1996)
      As oil industry interest turns toward Alaskan oil fields with higher unit costs of production and, consequently, lower state revenues per barrel, an important public policy question is whether these fields on state lands are able to "pay their own way." This is loosely defined to mean that the benefits to the state from the development of the publicly owned resource exceed the public costs associated with development. A related question is how much state tax and royalty policy can change in an attempt to stimulate marginal field development and still provide a net economic benefit to the state. This paper develops a methodology for analyzing the conditions under which an oil field development produces a net economic benefit to the state. The model calculates the public sector costs associated with field development and compares them to the public revenues generated by the oil production from the field. The methodology demonstrates that whether a project produces net economic benefits depends not only upon the characteristics of the economy, the characteristics of the oil field, and the existing or anticipated fiscal regime but also on the benefits and costs chosen for inclusion in the analysis. In particular, the question of which revenues and which costs to attribute to the development is an important determinant of the result. The paper presents an analysis using a hypothetical marginal oil field in Alaska as an example. This example demonstrates that using the definitions of costs and benefits commonly associated with other natural resource activities in the state, marginal oil field development is likely to be able to "pay its own way" under a variety of fiscal regimes. This paper was presented at the International Conference on Petroleum Fiscal Regimes in Anchorage, Alaska on May 3, 1996 .