• The Foraker Group Report on the Alaska Nonprofit Economy: 2010 Update

      Goldsmith, Oliver Scott; Schwörer, Tobias (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2010-11)
      A report on the economic importance of Alaska’s nonprofit sector conducted by the Institute of Social and Economic Research University of Alaska Anchorage
    • Forcible Rapes and Sexual Assaults in Anchorage

      Rosay, André B. (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2009-03)
      This study examined the characteristics of all sexual assaults reported to the Anchorage Police Department from 2000 through 2003. Key descriptive findings are summarized. * Victims tended to be young and female, with Native women victims in over 45% of reported sexual assaults. * In a majority of the assaults — over 62% — the assailant was not a stranger to the victim. The most common non-stranger relationships included friends and acquaintances. * A majority of the assaults occurred indoors, with 45% taking place at the residence of one or both of those involved. * Sixty-five percent of victims had used alcohol prior to the assault and 74% of suspects had also.
    • Forest Service Acquisition of Harvested Native Lands in Southeast Alaska

      Knapp, Gunnar (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 1991)
      This study describes Native lands in southeast Alaska and discusses the market value of these lands. The study was mandated by section 501(c) of the Tongass Timber Reform Act of 1990, to assess the feasibility of Forest Service acquisition of significantly harvested lands. During the course of the study, neither the Forest Service nor any Native corporations indicated either a specific or a general interest in such acquisitions; thus the study focuses on providing general background information about Native lands and their market value. A major problem in estimating market values for harvested timberland in southeast Alaska is that no sales of large tracts of harvested or unharvested lands have occurred. Large tracts might command significantly lower per-acre prices than have occurred in the past for small tracts. Appendixes to the report include maps showing the boundaries of Native timberlands and areas of significant timber harvesting; aerial photographs; and other detailed data.
    • Fostering Place-Based Education and Inclusion in the Classroom Through School Grades

      Gonzales-Smith, Karina (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2020-12-01)
      Place-based education expands the space where students learn by connecting to the outdoors, such as garden-based lessons that are dynamic and have a multidisciplinary curriculum. Students are given the opportunity to learn healthy behaviors, environmentally sustainable practices, and life skills. Inclusion is fostered by giving teachers and students agency in the learning experience. The purpose of this study was to view garden education through the lens of place-based education, critical pedagogy, and social justice. To this end, a lesson plan template was created to facilitate future development of garden-based lessons characterized by responsive curriculum and alignment with academic standards. A university internship course was visualized to support the collaborative effort of school garden programs.
    • Fostering Professional Quality of Life in Nurses: An Online Curriculum

      Green, Kari (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-05-01)
      The nursing profession is based on compassion toward others, with inherent risks and rewards for nurses. The cost of caring is even more prevalent within the context of the current healthcare crisis. Despite implications at the personal, professional, and larger healthcare system level, little effort is being directed toward mitigating these negative effects. The efficacy of self-care and mindfulness practices is promising, yet succinct tools are not readily available. An online curriculum was created to promote awareness, provide evidence-based education, and encourage application of self-care and mindfulness practices for nursing students, practicing nurses, and Advanced Practice Registered Nurses to help mitigate the negative effects of compassion fatigue and positively impact professional nursing quality of life. Overall, there was a positive response based on relevance, practicality, and satisfaction from users, as evidenced by responses on a post-completion survey.
    • Fostering Professional Quality of Life in Nurses: An Online Curriculum

      Green, Kari (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-05-01)
      The nursing profession is based on compassion toward others, with inherent risks and rewards for nurses. The cost of caring is even more prevalent within the context of the current healthcare crisis. Despite implications at the personal, professional, and larger healthcare system level, little effort is being directed toward mitigating these negative effects. The efficacy of self-care and mindfulness practices is promising, yet succinct tools are not readily available. An online curriculum was created to promote awareness, provide evidence-based education, and encourage application of self-care and mindfulness practices for nursing students, practicing nurses, and Advanced Practice Registered Nurses to help mitigate the negative effects of compassion fatigue and positively impact professional nursing quality of life. Overall, there was a positive response based on relevance, practicality, and satisfaction from users, as evidenced by responses on a post-completion survey.
    • Four Scenarios for Alaska's Future

      Goldsmith, Oliver Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2011-05)
      The Alaska economy is growing as high commodity prices (for oil and gold in particular) drive the private sector and oil revenue surpluses fuel the state budget. But as oil production continues to decline; the prospect for commercialization of North Slope gas in the near term fades; access to petroleum resources on federal lands remains stalled; and non-petroleum resource development moves forward only slowly, many Alaskans are concerned with what path the Alaska economy will take in the next decades. We could go in four possible directions. Here we offer a short description of each scenario— general enough to let each person fill in the blanks. Our objective is not to predict but rather to stimulate thought and discussion about what Alaskans can and should do to move the economy along the preferred path. Here’s a summary of the four potential paths. A more detailed description follows.
    • A Framework for a Multi-Year Development Program Targeting High Potential Individuals in the Alaska Oil and Gas Industry

      Loomis, Ryan (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-12-01)
      The Alaska Oil & Gas industry has a limited labor pool which creates a high demand for talented individuals. As a result competition is fierce among the companies in the Alaska's Oil and Gas industry. Furthermore, companies devote considerable resources to recruiting and training talent, only to see individuals leave for a competitor or Alaska altogether; individuals who exhibit potential for leadership are difficult to retain. Individuals with experience in all aspects of Arctic projects, from engineering through operations, are in high demand. Despite this, some of largest employers in Alaska do not have solidified long term programs for developing talent in these areas. There is a need for the contractor companies in Alaska's Oil & Gas industry to develop and implement a plan which would ultimately result in the retention of talented, skilled employees. This project produced a framework which can be utilized by companies to implement competitive multi-year development programs specific to the unique Alaska Oil & Gas contractor industry. The produced framework focused on job movement with aspects of mentorship and applicable higher education. Through use of the this framework, employees would become highly trained and dedicated to their Alaska Oil & Gas employer as they received high quality and diverse experiences while developing long term relationships with mentors dedicated to the success of the participant and Alaska's economy. The primary outcome of framework implementation would be increased retention of high potential individuals. The desired secondary outcomes would be a more knowledgeable workforce and increased cross business collaboration.
    • A Framework for Culturally Relevant Online Learning: Lessons from Alaska's Tribal Health Workers.

      Cueva, Katie; Cueva, Melany; Revels, Laura; Lanier, Anne P; Dignan, Mark; Viswanath, K; Fung, Teresa T; Geller, Alan C (2019-08)
      Culturally relevant health promotion is an opportunity to reduce health inequities in diseases with modifiable risks, such as cancer. Alaska Native people bear a disproportionate cancer burden, and Alaska's rural tribal health workers consequently requested cancer education accessible online. In response, the Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium cancer education team sought to create a framework for culturally relevant online learning to inform the creation of distance-delivered cancer education. Guided by the principles of community-based participatory action research and grounded in empowerment theory, the project team conducted a focus group with 10 Alaska Native education experts, 12 culturally diverse key informant interviews, a key stakeholder survey of 62 Alaska Native tribal health workers and their instructors/supervisors, and a literature review on distance-delivered education with Alaska Native or American Indian people. Qualitative findings were analyzed in Atlas.ti, with common themes presented in this article as a framework for culturally relevant online education. This proposed framework includes four principles: collaborative development, interactive content delivery, contextualizing learning, and creating connection. As an Alaskan tribal health worker shared "we're all in this together. All about conversations, relationships. Always learn from you/with you, together what we know and understand from the center of our experience, our ways of knowing, being, caring." The proposed framework has been applied to support cancer education and promote cancer control with Alaska Native people and has motivated health behavior change to reduce cancer risk. This framework may be adaptable to other populations to guide effective and culturally relevant online interventions.
    • From Land Rights to Sovereignty: Curious Parallels between Alaskan and Canadian Indigenous Peoples

      Conn, Stephen (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1989-11)
      Alaska Natives and Canadian aboriginal peoples have been late bloomers in securing land claims based on aboriginal title and its extinguishment. While the reasons for this delay relate to the discrete development of Indian policy in each country, both groups now find themselves seeking explicit governmental authority to regulate this domain. Despite the juridical premise that only those groups capable of controlling land have aboriginal claims to cede and/or extinguish, modern groups must secure federal confirmation of their sovereign powers. Barriers in each country are similar; so are the strategies employed.
    • From Northern Village to Global Village

      Hudson, Heather (Global Telecom Women's Network, 2012)
      The digital divide, which originally signifed the gap between those with Internet acces and those without, now applies to broadband. As other software and applications, such as health records, government documents, and educational materials are moving to the cloud rather than being installed on local devices, people in developing regions will need affordable broadband to access them.
    • From Oil to Assets: Managing Alaska's New Wealth

      Goldsmith, Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 1998)
      Low oil prices always capture headlines in Alaska, because the state government has run mostly on oil revenues for 20 years. So the slide in oil prices this year has once again made us think Alaska is becoming poor, and we worry about more budget cuts and an economic downturn. But two big changes in recent years make Alaska’s current fiscal condition better than it might seem. Sustainable revenues (and spending) are higher than we estimated a few years ago. And with a growing share of revenues from asset earnings, the state has the chance to make its year-to-year revenue flow more stable. Still, despite this good news, problems remain. The state’s fiscal policy has been to divide general purpose revenues into two categories: oil revenues have mostly paid General Fund expenses, and Permanent Fund earnings have been used to pay dividends to Alaskans (as well as to inflation-proof and build the fund balance). Low oil prices gouged a hole in the General Fund budget in 1998, while a strong stock market boosted Permanent Fund earnings. In the following pages we discuss in more detail the good financial news for Alaska and how we estimate “sustainable” spending. We also look at the choices Alaska has for keeping its finances healthy in the long run.
    • From Pine Ridge to Alaska Native Villages

      Berg, Paul (University of Alaska Anchorage. Bookstore, 2016-08-06)
      In his memoir, Sandra's Hands, a Reflective Journey from the Vietnam War to the Siege of Wounded Knee, Paul Berg explores his experiences in the Vietnam War and working as a teacher on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota for the Bureau of Indian Affairs. After 1973, when tensions on the reservation exploded and culminated in the 72 day siege of the village of Wounded Knee, Paul Berg finds himself drawn into the conflict as he strives to provide quality education to his students. After this experience and given his dedication to education, he becomes a recognized national expert in cross-cultural education and establishes, with Bill Demmert and Richard Dauenhauer, the first cross-cultural education course required for teacher education in Alaska.
    • From the Beverly Hillbillies to Duck Dynasty: Whiteness, Culture, and Memory in the American South.

      Hartman, Ian C. (University of Alaska Anchorage. Bookstore, 2014-04-07)
      At this event, professor Ian Hartman (UAA History Dept.) discusses how white racial identity in the America South has shaped public policy and popular culture throughout America. His research has been published in American Nineteenth Century History and in The Journal of Southern History. Currently, he is working on a book about race, labor, and economic development in the American west since the Civil War.
    • From Verse to Free Verse, Alaska Poetry from 1867 until 1966.

      Sexton, Tom (University of Alaska Anchorage. Bookstore, 2018-08-02)
      At this event, poet Tom Sexton presents part two of his talk on a brief history of Alaska poetry from 1867-1966. Part one was recorded on October 24, 2017 at the UAA Campus Bookstore. Poet Tom Sexton is a Professor Emeritus of English at the University of Alaska Anchorage and was Alaska's Poet Laureate from 1994 until 2000. He is the author of several collections of poetry including For the Sake of the Light and I Think Again of Those Ancient Chinese Poets, both from University of Alaska Press.
    • From War to Peace: Post Conflict Developments in the World

      Ama, Michihiro; Sayles, Chelsea; Shannon, Kelly (University of Alaska Anchorage. Bookstore, 2013-04-17)
      At this event, panelists include Michihiro Ama (Languages Dept./UAA), Chelsea Sayles (Campus Diversity and Compliance/UAA) and Kelly Shannon (History Dept./UAA). Violence, international law, and the nature of peace are topics to be highlighted. This event is being held in honor of Holocaust Remembrance Day (April 8th, 2013.)
    • Front Matter

      ANSC (2015-08-20)
    • Fuel Costs, Migration, and Community Viability

      Martin, Stephanie; Killorin, Mary; Colt, Steve (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2008-05)
      ISER researchers compiled and reviewed existing studies and data sources relating to the economic and social viability of remote rural Alaska communities. We particularly looked for possible linkages between high fuel costs and migration. Our review indicates the following: (1) migration from smaller places toward larger places is an ongoing phenomenon that is more noticeable when birth rates drop; (2) there is no systematic empirical evidence that fuel prices, by themselves, have been a definitive cause of migration; (3) the pursuit of economic and educational opportunities appears to be a predominant cause of migration; (4) however, currently available survey data are not sufficient to definitively determine other reasons for migration, which could include concerns about public safety and/or alcohol abuse; 5) most of the survey data pre-date the latest rapid increase (2006-2008) in fuel prices. We suggest several ways that better data could be collected on community viability and the reasons for migration.
    • Fuel, Wood Use, and Subsistence

      "Schmidt, Jennifer; Byrd, Amanda; Brinkman, Todd; Holdmann, Gwen; Vilagi, Alana; Bond, Baxter "; National Science Foundation (NSF # 1518563) (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2019)
      Provides an overview of the use of biomass in a remote Alaskan community. Presented at Arctic Frontiers in Tromsø, Norway on January 24, 2019. Funded as part of a National Science Foundation grant (NSF # 1518563)
    • The Future of Disability in Alaska Summit & Follow-up Survey

      Center for Human Development, University of Alaska Anchorage (Center for Human Development, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2013-12)
      The Future of Disability in Alaska Summit was held in Anchorage in the summer of 2013, May 9-10. The purpose was to gather perspectives from a diverse group of stakeholders to inform a vision of the future for people with disabilities in Alaska in five broad topical areas: 1) Housing Arrangements, 2) Advocacy, 3) Relationships, 4) Economic Wellbeing, and 5) Health. About 76 stakeholders participated in the summit including people with disabilities, family members, advocates, service providers, policymakers, and others. A follow-up online survey was conducted to gather information from a broader range of stakeholders and to get a sense of the highest priorities in each area. The purpose of the report and other products coming out of this effort is to inspire stakeholders to periodically reflect, individually and in groups, on how they are working toward the vision in a relevant area and taking action in the context of advocacy, policy/regulation, funding, and services/resources. The report states a vision for each of the five topical areas and includes many suggested strategies to accomplish it.