• Seasonal Characteristics of Humpback Whales {Megaptera novaeangliae) in Southeastern Alaska

      Straley, Janice M.; Gabriele, Christine M.; Baker, C. Scott (National Park Service Alaska System Support Office, 1995-11)
      Humpback whales were studied in southeastern Alaska to assess seasonal distribution and numbers, migration patterns, length of stay, female reproductive histories, and calf survival. A mean annual estimate and 95% confidence interval of whales present in the study areas was 404 ± 54 individuals. The longest length of stay was nearly 7 months, and the shortest transit to the Hawaiian mating and calving grounds was 39 days. Generally, birth intervals did not vary from one calf every two or three years; individual variation ranged from one to five years. There were few resightings of whales first seen as calves. The recovery of North Pacific humpback whales will only occur through an increase in the survival of calves to become sexually mature and reproducing adults.