• Summary of Reported Whale-Vessel Collisions in Alaskan Waters

      Neilson, Janet L.; Gabriele, Christine M.; Jensen, Aleria S.; Jackson, Kaili; Straley, Janice M. (Hindawi Publishing Corporation, 2012-03-26)
      Here we summarize 108 reported whale-vessel collisions in Alaska from 1978–2011, of which 25 are known to have resulted in the whale's death. We found 89 definite and 19 possible/probable strikes based on standard criteria we created for this study. Most strikes involved humpback whales (86%) with six other species documented. Small vessel strikes were most common (<15 m, 60%), but medium (15–79 m, 27%) and large (≥80 m, 13%) vessels also struck whales. Among the 25 mortalities, vessel length was known in seven cases (190–294 m) and vessel speed was known in three cases (12–19 kn). In 36 cases, human injury or property damage resulted from the collision, and at least 15 people were thrown into the water. In 15 cases humpback whales struck anchored or drifting vessels, suggesting the whales did not detect the vessels. Documenting collisions in Alaska will remain challenging due to remoteness and resource limitations. For a better understanding of the factors contributing to lethal collisions, we recommend (1) systematic documentation of collisions, including vessel size and speed; (2) greater efforts to necropsy stranded whales; (3) using experienced teams focused on determining cause of death; (4) using standard criteria for validating collision reports, such as those presented in this paper.
    • Summit: The UAS Writing Center's Collection of Exceptional Academic Works for 2019/2020

      Neeland, Allison; Zahnd, Honesty; Steiner, Alicia; Cruz, Celestina; Cole, Robert; Billings, Rayne; Brend, Olive (The University of Alaska Southeast Writing Center, 2020)
      It is with great enthusiasm that the UAS Writing Center launches our inaugural edition of Summit: The UAS Writing Center’s Collection of Exceptional Academic Works for 2019/2020. In the Writing Center, we have the privilege of seeing the wide range of talents and interests of our UAS students and the exceptional way that they communicate their research, analysis, and philosophical ruminations through essays, speeches, and written reports. The tutors in the Writing Center engage with their peers in fascinating discussions of historical events, political debates, scientific discoveries, teaching pedagogy, and business theory (to name a few). We celebrate when students receive stellar grades on their assignments, but we also recognize that good writing should be shared beyond the classroom. Summit emerged from a desire to highlight and publish the extraordinary writing that we get the honor to see in the Writing Center every day. This journal, however, is more than just a showcase of undergraduate writing. It has also been an opportunity for the undergraduate student tutors to engage in a collaborative project that required time management, careful communication, attention to detail and leadership skills. The editors and contributors have persevered through unimaginable (until now) challenges including unprecedented budget cuts at the university and a global pandemic that forced us to move our work online. At a time when the present feels chaotic and worrying, the undergraduate students at UAS remind me that our future is in good hands. I am confident in our new generation of leaders as I’ve watched our students think critically, engage in the community, and work tirelessly for projects they believe in. It is joy to present our first edition of Summit! Allison Neeland UAS Writing Center Specialist
    • Summit: The UAS Writing Center's Collection of Exceptional Academic Works for 2020/2021

      Billings, Rayne; Brend, Olive; Goodman, Jessy; Cruz, Celestina; Erickson, Anastasia; Hein, Berni; Hoagland, James; File, Braden; Steiner, Alicia; File, Braden; et al. (University of Alaska Southeast Writing Center, 2021)
      We at the UAS Writing Center are once again pleased to announce the completion of the second edition of our undergraduate academic writing journal, Summit: The UAS Writing Center’s Collection of Exceptional Academic Works for 2020/2021. This year’s edition is dedicated to Allison Neeland, our past Specialist, for all her support and dedication to the Writing Center. We also extend a hearty congratulation to UAS senior Celestina Cruz for winning the 2020/2021 Ernestine Hayes Award for Excellence in Academic Writing. Also included in the journal are the works of five other student writers: Rayne Billings, Anastasia Erickson, Berni Hein, James Hoagland, and Alicia Steiner. Thank you to everyone who submitted, to our panel of faculty and student judges, to Diersen Bankert for creating this year’s stunning cover, to Student Government for funding the prize money, and to everyone else who has supported this publication.
    • Teachers and the Inclusive Classroom: A Meta-Synthesis

      Hudson, Jennifer L. (University of Alaska Southeast, 2016)
      This meta-synthesis of teachers and inclusive classrooms examines the relationship between the inclusive classroom and teachers that feel successful at teaching in an inclusive classroom. Teachers of inclusive classrooms have expressed how they feel more successful after having training and support in relationship to having an inclusive classroom. However, without training and support by their administration, teachers do not feel prepared to teach in an inclusive classroom due to the extra time and support students with disabilities may require. Inclusive classrooms could be very successful if all teachers felt as though they had the tools, education, and support needed to teach an inclusive class.
    • Teachers’ Perceptions of Inclusive Practices for Students with Emotional/Behavioral Disorders: A Meta-Synthesis

      Prewitt, Taylor (University of Alaska Southeast, 2019)
      The term inclusion has been tossed around the educational world for several decades now. In 1975 when the Education for All Handicapped Children Act, mandated that all children with special needs should be educated in their least restrictive environment (LRE) with their general educated peers, schools began to create special schools and self-contained classrooms for students with disabilities. In the 1980’s there was a movement to create a more inclusive and unified model of special education. Separate education was no longer equal and with the Regular Education Initiative’s (REI) attempt to correct the limitations of IDEA by creating one system of general education in which students with disabilities were to be supported within general education classrooms, the push for inclusion began. One major argument against full inclusion came from those who worked with students with emotional and/or behavioral disorders
    • Teaching Children with Reactive Attachment Disorder: A Review of the Literature

      Arnold, Shawn Travis (University of Alaska Southeast, 2009-07-14)
      Reactive Attachment Disorder (RAD) has been examined by the psychological community for many years, but only in recent years has it entered the realm of education and recognizing students with RAD has occurred. Disagreements continue to take place over what types of assessments or interventions may work for children with RAD. Often children with RAD are not diagnosis [sic] because the symptoms reflect other dysfunctional behaviors and teachers reject these students as unwilling to accept instruction. This paper is a literature review of professional articles available with bearing on teaching children with RAD. In addition, this article presents behaviors of RAD and describes recommendations in dealing with students with RAD that teachers may use. Lastly, the article briefly summarizes the content of several research articles.
    • Teaching Methods for Students with AD/HD: A Meta-Synthesis

      Creamer, Matt (University of Alaska Southeast, 2011-07-30)
      This metasynthesis explores teaching methods and strategies for helping middle school students with ADHD. Students with ADHD show more frequent patterns of inattention, hyperactivity, or impulsivity compared to their peers. There is a significant difference between students with and without ADHD. The severity of ADHD will increasingly affect students' academic performance and social support in the classroom setting. Teachers can improve student performance by incorporating specific interventions, accommodations, and modifications to the students' academic curriculum. In addition, the concepts of teacher support, parent collaboration, and student medication were also discussed. This text also provides suggestion and advice for future special education teachers.
    • Teaching Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders in Inclusive Classrooms (Grades P-3): A Meta-Synthesis

      Clifford, Melody (University of Alaska Southeast, 2011-08-02)
      This meta-synthesis focuses on the literature pertaining to students with emotional and behavioral disorders in inclusive preschool through third grade classrooms. The first purpose of this study was to discover the feelings and ideas that teachers, parents and community members have. Teachers, parents and community members have varying views about inclusion of students with emotional and behavioral disorders. The second purpose was to discover ideas that teachers could use in the classroom to successfully support students with emotional and behavioral disorders.
    • Test

      Cox, David (2020-01-28)
      This is a test upload to check on the status of submissions. This is only a test.
    • Testing a glacial erosion rule using hang heights of hanging valleys, Jasper National Park, Alberta, Canada

      Amundson, Jason M.; Iverson, N. R. (American Geophysical Union, 2006)
      In most models of glacial erosion, glacier sliding velocity is hypothesized to control rates of bedrock erosion. If this hypothesis is correct, then the elevation difference between hanging and trunk valley floors, the hang height, should be dictated by the relative sliding velocities of the glaciers that occupied these valleys. By considering sliding velocity to be proportional to balance velocity and using mass continuity, hang height is expressed in terms of glacier catchment areas, slopes, and widths, which can be estimated for past glaciers from the morphology of glacial valleys. These parameters were estimated for 46 hanging valleys and their trunk valleys in three adjacent regions of Jasper National Park. The variability in valley morphology can account for 55–85% of the hang height variability if erosion rate scales with balance velocity raised to a power of 1/3. This correspondence is in spite of spatial variations in glaciation duration, snow accumulation rates, and other variables that likely affected hang heights but cannot be readily estimated and so are not included in our formulation. Thus it appears that balance velocity, and by extension, sliding velocity if the two are proportional, may be a reasonable control variable for assessing erosion rate.
    • Theorizing the Relationship Between Identity and Diversity Engagement: Openness Through Identity Mismatch

      Haugen, A.D.; Rieck, S.M.; Salter, P.S.; Mukherjee, S.; Perez, M.J. (International Association for Cross-Cultural Psychology (IACCP), 2018-06-27)
      Psychological research suggests that engagement with diversity-relevant materials can have a positive impact on interracial relations. However, prior research also suggests that there may be individual differences in how effective exposure to critical diversity narratives would be in facilitating positive intergroup attitudes. The primary aim of this paper is to provide some empirically based theorizing about patterns of group identification and their relationship to effective diversity exposure. In this chapter, we discuss two examples of research that explore for whom engagement with critical diversity activities may facilitate increased perceptions of social inequality. We begin by conceptualizing four race-based identity profiles derived from orthogonal considerations of attachment and glorification. We discuss support for findings that suggest that scoring high on one dimension but not the other (mixed or mismatched identity profiles) constitutes the identity profiles most likely to facilitate openness to critical, potentially identity-threatening, diversity content.
    • Tidal Echoes 2003

      Holloway, Robin; Trincado, Andrea; Andree, Judy; Cohen, Greg; Easley, Alexis; Pentecost, Clarissa; Wall, Emily; McKenzie, Liz (University of Alaska Southeast, 2003)
      Tidal Echoes presents an annual showcase of writers and artists who share one thing in common: a life surrounded by the rainforests and waterways of Southeast Alaska.
    • Tidal Echoes 2007

      Sotomayor, Ryan; Bettridge, Loren; Sisk, Kara; McKenzie, Elizabeth; Landis, Rod; Minton, Sara; Clark, Eileen; Tersteeg, Alice; Wall, Emily (University of Alaska Southeast, 2007-03-20)
      Featuring the work of students, faculty, and staff of the University of Alaska Southeast and members of the community.
    • Tidal Echoes 2008

      Bettridge, Loren; Carter, Josh; McKenzie, Elizabeth; Landis, Rod; Hayes, Ernestine; Wall, Emily; Koester, Susan; Devine-Acres, Jo; Goyette, David Charles; Minton, Sara; et al. (University of Alaska Southeast, 2008-03-20)
      Featuring the work of students, faculty, and staff of the University of Alaska Southeast and members of the community.
    • Tidal Echoes 2009

      Carter, Josh; Fisk, Chalise; Dammerman, Kari; Maier, Kevin; Koester, Sue; Kane, Jeremy; Minton, Sara; Wall, Emily; Berg, Virginia; Dodd, Liz; et al. (University of Alaska Southeast and Capital City Weekly, 2009-03-20)
      Tidal Echoes is an annual showcase of writers and artists with one thing in common: a life surrounded by the rainforests and waterways of Southeast Alaska.
    • Tidal Echoes 2010

      Kane, Jeremy; Dalthorp, Pedar; Minton, Sara; Ray, Sarah Jaquette; Whalen, Teague; Vernon, Jenifer; Neely, Sol; Landis, Rod; Wall, Emily; Berg, Virginia; et al. (University of Alaska Southeast and Capital City Weekly, 2010-03-20)
      Tidal Echoes presents an annual showcase of writers and artists who share one thing in common: a life surrounded by the rainforests and waterways of Southeast Alaska.
    • Tidal Echoes 2011

      Lambert, Kaleigh; Bay, Thomas; Kane, Jeremy; Dalthorp, Pedar; Minton, Sara; Hayes, Ernestine; Wakefield, Claudia; Chordas, Nina; Neely, Sol; Wall, Emily; et al. (University of Alaska Southeast and Capital City Weekly, 2011-03-20)
      Tidal Echoes presents an annual showcase of writers and artists who share one thing in common: a life surrounded by the rainforests and waterways of Southeast Alaska.
    • Tidal Echoes 2012

      Bay, Thomas; Brown, Alexandra; Boucher, Jacqueline; Kane, Jeremy; Neely, Sol; Minton, Sara; Mitchell, Karen; Vernon, Jenifer; Maier, Kevin; Wedler, Annie; et al. (University of Alaska Southeast, 2012-03-20)
      Tidal Echoes presents an annual showcase of writers and artists who share one thing in common: a life surrounded by the rainforests and waterways of Southeast Alaska.
    • Tidal Echoes 2013

      Brown, Alexandra; Stangeland, Meghan; Sleppy, Karissa; Wall, Emily; Maier, Kevin; Landis, Rod; Dalthorp, Pedar; Chordas, Nina; Neely, Sol; Minton, Sara; et al. (University of Alaska Southeast, 2013-03-20)
      Tidal Echoes presents an annual showcase of writers and artists who share one thing in common: a life surrounded by the rainforests and waterways of Southeast Alaska.