Now showing items 1-20 of 1509

    • Sound and Silence 1975

      Silva, Ron (Juneau-Douglas Community College of the University of Alaska, 1975)
      Sound and Silence second issue, published annually by the Creative Writing Program, Juneau Douglas Community College of the University of Alaska, Juneau. Each issue shall display the works of an individual artist as well as several poets and prose writers.
    • Sound and Silence 1974

      Silva, Ron (Juneau-Douglas Community College of the University of Alaska, 1974)
      Sound and Silence first issue, published annually by the Creative Writing Program, Juneau-Douglas Community College of the University of Alaska, Juneau. Each work shall display the works of individual artists as well as several poets and prose writers.
    • Explorations 1988

      Smith, David; Petersen, Art; Silva, Ron (University of Alaska Southeast, 1988)
      Explorations 1988 is Literary Publication from the University of Alaska Southeast.
    • Explorations 2002

      Petersen, Art; Silva, Ron; Breinig, Jeane; Tersteeg, Alice (University of Alaska Southeast, 2002)
      Explorations 2002 is rendered with generous support by the University of Alaska (President’s Office, UAA Arts & Sciences, UAF Chancellor’s Office, & UAS Academic Programs), by volunteer editorial boards, & by reader fees from writers across Alaska, the US, Canada, & Europe.
    • Explorations 2001

      Petersen, Art; Silva, Ron; Breinig, Jeane; Tersteeg, Alice (University of Alaska Southeast, 2001)
      Explorations 2001 is rendered with generous support by the University of Alaska (President’s Office, UAA Arts & Sciences, UAF Chancellor’s Office, & UAS Academic Programs), by volunteer editorial boards, & by reader fees from writers across Alaska, the US, Canada, & Europe.
    • Explorations 2000

      Petersen, Art; Silva, Ron; Breinig, Jeane; Tersteeg, Alice (University of Alaska Southeast, 2000)
      Explorations 2000, in its 19th year, is sponsored by generous support from the University of Alaska in Southeast (UAS Academic Programs) and in Anchorage (UAA College of Arts & Sciences), volunteer editorial boards, and reader fees from poets and writers across Alaska, the U.S., Canada, and Europe.
    • Explorations 1999

      Petersen, Art; Silva, Ron; Breinig, Jeane; Tersteeg, Alice (University of Alaska Southeast, 1999)
      Explorations ‘99, in its 18th year, is sponsored by generous support from the University of Alaska in Southeast (UAS Academic Programs) and Anchorage (UAA College of Arts & Sciences), a volunteer editorial board, and reader fees from poets and writers across Alaska, the U.S., Canada, and Europe.
    • Trophic stability and change across a sea ice cover gradient on the western Antarctic Peninsula

      Galloway, A. W. E.; Schram, Julie; Lowe, A. T.; Whippo, R.; Heiser, S.; Iken, K.; McClintock, J. B.; Klein, A. G.; Amsler, M. O.; Amsler, C. D. (Inter-Research, 2024-05-02)
      The western Antarctic Peninsula (AP) is experiencing significant changes to sea ice cover, altering the macroalgal cover and potentially affecting the foundation of benthic food webs. We used fatty acid signatures as dietary and physiological trophic biomarkers to test the hypothesis that a gradient of 36-88% mean annual ice cover would affect the trophic ecology of fleshy macroalgae and diverse benthic invertebrate consumers along the western AP. We used SCUBA to collect organisms from benthic rocky nearshore habitats, 5-35 m depth, at 15 study sites during April-May of 2019. There were no consistent ecosystem-scale differences in the nutritionally important polyunsaturated fatty acids or other univariate fatty acid summary categories in either the seaweeds or invertebrates across the ice gradient, but we did find site-level differences in the multivariate fatty acid signatures of all seaweeds and invertebrates. Ice cover was a significant driver of the fatty acid signatures of 5 invertebrates, including 3 sessile (an anemone, a sponge, and a tunicate) and 2 mobile consumers (a sea star and a sea urchin). The multivariate fatty acid signatures of 2 other sea stars and a limpet were not affected by the ice gradient. These results indicate that the trophic ecology and resource assimilation of sessile consumers that are more connected to the macroalgal-derived food web will be more sensitive than mobile consumers to impending changes to annual ice and macroalgal cover along the western AP.
    • Fatty acid profiles and stable isotope composition of Antarctic macroalgae: a baseline for a combined biomarker approach in food web studies

      Whippo, Ross; Iken, Katrin; Amsler, Charles D.; Lowe, Alexander T.; Schram, Julie; Klein, Andrew G.; Heiser, Sabrina; Amsler, Margaret O.; McClintock, James B.; Galloway, Aaron W. E. (Springer Nature, 2024-03-26)
      The Western Antarctic Peninsula supports a diverse assemblage of > 100 described macroalgal species that contribute to the base of coastal food webs, but their contribution to local nearshore food webs is still uncertain across larger spatial scales. The analysis of biomarkers, specifically fatty acids and stable isotopes, offers a tool to clarify the trophic role of Antarctic macroalgae. The aim of this study was to describe the fatty acid profiles and stable isotope values of 31 algal species from three divisions (Chlorophyta—1, Ochrophyta—8, Rhodophyta—22) collected at the same sites for both biomarkers. Of these, 13 species had no previously published fatty acid profiles. Most species were rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), suggesting they are highly nutritious and could be a resource of essential fatty acids for consumers. This was specifically noticeable in the overall low PUFA ratio (∑ω6/∑ω3 ratio), with low ratios being an indicator of high nutritional quality for consumers. Fatty acid profiles of macroalgae grouped strongly by phylogeny (at the levels of division, order, and family), while stable isotope groupings were more driven by the physiological properties of the species. Specifically, some closely related red algal species exhibited very different stable isotope values based on their carbon concentrating mechanisms, with highly 13C-depleted values in several Rhodophyta species. The fact that the two biomarker approaches created different groupings of Antarctic macroalgae collected at the same locations emphasizes that their combined application can be a powerful tool in Antarctic coastal food web studies.
    • Snow avalanches are a primary climate-linked driver of mountain ungulate populations

      White, Kevin S.; Hood, Eran; Wolken, Gabriel J.; Peitzsch, Erich H.; Bühler, Yves; Jones, Katreen Wikstrom; Darimont, Chris T. (Springer Nature, 2024-04-29)
      Snow is a major, climate-sensitive feature of the Earth’s surface and catalyst of fundamentally important ecosystem processes. Understanding how snow influences sentinel species in rapidly changing mountain ecosystems is particularly critical. Whereas effects of snow on food availability, energy expenditure, and predation are well documented, we report how avalanches exert major impacts on an ecologically significant mountain ungulate - the coastal Alaskan mountain goat (Oreamnos americanus). Using long-term GPS data and field observations across four populations (421 individuals over 17 years), we show that avalanches caused 23−65% of all mortality, depending on area. Deaths varied seasonally and were directly linked to spatial movement patterns and avalanche terrain use. Population-level avalanche mortality, 61% of which comprised reproductively important prime-aged individuals, averaged 8% annually and exceeded 22% when avalanche conditions were severe. Our findings reveal a widespread but previously undescribed pathway by which snow can elicit major population-level impacts and shape demographic characteristics of slow-growing populations of mountain-adapted animals.
    • Perceived challenges to tribally led shellfish toxin testing in Southeast Alaska: Findings from key informant interviews

      Roland, Hugh B.; Kohlhoff, Jacob; Lanphier, Kari; Hoysala, Sneha; Kennedy, Esther G.; Harley, John R.; Whitehead, Christopher; Gribble, Matthew O. (John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2024-03-07)
      Shellfish harvesting is central to coastal Alaska Native ways of life, and tribes in Southeast Alaska are committed to preserving sustainable and safe access to subsistence foods. However, consumption of non-commercially harvested shellfish puts Alaska Native communities at elevated risk of exposure to shellfish toxins. To address a lack of state or federal toxin testing for subsistence and recreational harvesting, tribes across Southeast Alaska have formed their own toxin testing and ocean monitoring program. In this study, we interviewed environmental managers responsible for tribes' testing and others with shellfish toxin expertise to report on perceptions of barriers to tribally led testing in Southeast Alaska. Tribal staff identified 40 prospective key informants to interview, including all environmental managers responsible for shellfish toxin testing at subsistence sites in Southeast Alaska. All 40 individuals were invited to participate in an interview and 27 individuals were interviewed. The most frequently discussed barriers to shellfish toxin testing in Southeast Alaska relate to logistical and staffing difficulties associated with communities' remote locations, inconsistent and inadequate funding and funding structures that increase staff burdens, risk communication challenges related to conveying exposure risks while supporting subsistence harvesting, and implications of climate change-related shifts in toxin exposures for risk perception and risk communication. Participants stressed the social origins of perceived barriers. Disinvestment may create and sustain barriers and be most severely felt in Native communities and remote places. Climate change impacts may interact with social and cultural factors to further complicate risk management.
    • Glaciers, snow, and rain: Water source influences invertebrate community structure and secondary production across a hydrologically diverse subarctic landscape

      Dunkle, Matthew; Bellmore, J. Ryan; Fellman, Jason; Caudill, Christopher C. (John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2024-02)
      The melting cryosphere adds heterogeneity to the abiotic and biotic characteristics of many high latitude and montane rivers. However, climate change threatens the cryosphere's persistence in many regions. While existing research has explored the impacts of cryospheric loss on the diversity and structure of freshwater communities, implications for functional traits of communities, such as production of aquatic invertebrates, remain unresolved. Here, we quantified aquatic invertebrate community structure and secondary production in southeast Alaska (USA) streams that represent a meltwater to non-meltwater gradient, including streams fed primarily by: (1) glacier-melt, (2) snowmelt, (3) rainfall, and (4) a combination of these sources. We found alpha diversity was highest in the snow-fed stream and lowest in the glacier-fed stream. Annual secondary production was also lowest in the glacier-fed stream (0.56 g ash-free dry mass m−2), but 2–5 times higher in the other stream types primarily due to greater production of shared taxa that were found in all streams. However, despite low invertebrate diversity and productivity, the glacier-fed stream hosted distinct species assemblages associated with unique cycles of stream flow, water temperature, turbidity, and nutrient concentrations, which contributed to higher beta diversity between streams. Our findings suggest that the loss of glacier-melt contributions to rivers may result in increased freshwater invertebrate production but reduced beta diversity, which could have implications for community stability and the capacity of landscapes to support higher-level consumers, including fishes.
    • Explorations 1998

      Petersen, Art; Silva, Ron; Tersteeg, Alice; Everest, Kathleen (University of Alaska Southeast, 1998)
      Explorations ‘98, in its 17th year, is sponsored by generous support from the University of Alaska Southeast (UAS), a volunteer editorial board, and reader fees from poets and writers across Alaska, the U.S., Canada, and Europe.
    • Explorations 1997

      Petersen, Art (University of Alaska Southeast, 1997)
      Explorations ‘97, in its 16th year of continuous publication, is sponsored by generous support from the University of Alaska Southeast (UAS), a volunteer editorial board, and reader fees from poets and writers across Alaska, the U.S., Canada, and Europe.
    • Explorations 1996

      Petersen, Art; Penny, Hattie (University of Alaska Southeast, 1996)
      Explorations ‘96 is published with generous support from the University of Alaska Southeast (UAS) School of Education, Liberal Arts, and Science, a volunteer editorial board, and reader fees from poets and writers from across Alaska, the U.S., Canada, and Europe.
    • Explorations 1994

      Petersen, Art; Currier, Erika (University of Alaska Southeast, 1994)
      Explorations ‘94, entering its 15th year, is published with support from the University of Alaska Southeast (UAS) School of Education, Liberal Arts, and Sciences, the United Students of UAS in Juneau, and the Chancellor’s Office.
    • Explorations 1993

      Petersen, Art; Silva, Ron; Rose, Patty (University of Alaska Southeast, 1993)
      Explorations ‘93, entering its 14th continuous year, is published with the support of the University of Alaska Southeast (UAS) School of Education, Liberal Arts, and Sciences, the United Students of UAS in Juneau, and the Chancellor’s Office.
    • Explorations 1992

      Petersen, Art; Silva, Ron (University of Alaska Southeast, 1992)
      Explorations ‘92, entering its 13th continuous year, is published with the support of the University of Alaska Southeast (UAS) School of Education, Liberal Arts, and Sciences and the United Students of the University of Alaska Southeast in Juneau.
    • Explorations 1991

      Petersen, Art; Silva, Ron (University of Alaska Southeast, 1991)
      Explorations ‘91, entering its 12th continuous year, is published with the cooperation and support of the School of Education, Liberal Arts, and Sciences and the United Students of the University of Alaska Southeast in Juneau.
    • Explorations 1990

      Petersen, Art; Silva, Ron (University of Alaska Southeast, 1990)
      Explorations 1990, entering its eleventh year of continuous publication, is published with the cooperation of the University of Alaska Southeast; works do not necessarily reflect the views of the university. Explorations receives grants from the School of Education, Liberal Arts, and Science and the United Students of the University of Alaska Southeast in Juneau.