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dc.contributor.authorLeonard, Shelby J.
dc.contributor.authorHawkins, Daniel B.
dc.contributor.authorTilsworth, Timothy
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-08T00:32:29Z
dc.date.available2019-06-08T00:32:29Z
dc.date.issued1987-07
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11122/10352
dc.description.abstractRadon levels were measured in forty public facilities throughout Alaska. Test buildings consisted mainly of schools, DOT/PF maintenance garages, and office buildings. The project had two general goals: 1) To determine whether areas of potentially high indoor radon levels can be identified based on knowledge of the bedrock geology in the area, and 2) to determine if there is cause for concern regarding radon levels in public facilities in Alaska. Radon levels measured ranged from 0.0 to 5.2 pCi/l with a mean value of 0.6 pCi/l. No conclusive evidence was found correlating radon concentration with the geology of an area. The data suggest no urgency regarding radon levels in public facilities in Alaska, especially where mechanical ventilation and positive building pressure influence the dispersion of concentrations. However, the small size of the sample and the fact that most of the buildings sampled were mechanically ventilated does not rule out the possibility that higher radon levels may yet be found.en_US
dc.description.tableofcontentsForeword - ii Abstract - iii Acknowledgments - iv Implementation - v Table of Contents - vi List of Figures - ix List of Tables - x Glossary - xi Nomenclature - xiii Introduction - 1 Environmental radiation - 5 Environmental radionuclides - 6 Production of radon and radon progeny - 7 Outdoor radon - 9 Indoor Radon - 12 Sources of Indoor Radon - 13 Radon in Soil - 14 Radon in Building Materials - 17 Radon in Water - 17 Radon in Natural Gas and Coal - 19 Indoor Radon Progeny - 20 Radon Mitigation Techniques - 22 Health Effects of Radionuclide Exposure - 25 Risk - 26 Detection - 27 Scintillation Techniques - 27 Time-integrated Methods - 28 Units - 30 Remedial Action Levels - 31 Radon as an Environmental Problem - 33 Natural and Enhanced Areas - 33 Potential for Radon Problems in Alaska - 34 Study Design - 36 Hypothesis - 36 Site Selection - 37 Contacts - 41 Detection Method - 42 Statistical Design - 42 Results - 44 Statistical Analysis - 48 Analysis of Replicates - 52 Discussion - 56 Use of Public Facilities as Test Sites - 56 Level of Refinement of Technique - 61 Scale of Study - 61 Summary - 62 Conclusions - 65 Recommendations for Further Study - 67 References - 69 Appendices - 73 Appendix A. Summary of Radon Reduction Techniques - 74 Appendix B. U.S. EPA Indoor Radon Measurement Protocols - 77 Appendix C. Complete List of Location, Detector ID# and Results - 82 Appendix D. ANOVA Example - 83en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleRadon Concentrations in Public Facilities in Alaskaen_US
dc.typeTechnical Reporten_US
refterms.dateFOA2020-03-06T02:33:12Z


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