• Baseline geochemical studies for resource evaluation of D-2 Lands - geophysical and geochemical investigations at the Red Dog and Drenchwater Creek mineral occurrences

      Metz, P.A., Robinson, M.S., and Lueck, L. (University of Alaska Mineral Industry Research Laboratory, 1979)
      Major zinc, lead and barite mineralization has been discovered at Red Dog and Drenchwater Creeks in the DeLong Mountains of north-western Alaska. The host rocks for the mineral occurrences are carbonates, cherts, shales, and dacitic volcanic rocks of the Mississippian Lisburne Group. The host rocks are deformed in a narrow belt of imbricate thrust sheets that extend from the Canadian border to the Chukchi Sea. The rocks strike generally east-west and dip to the south. The sulfide minerals occur as stratiform mineralization parallel to bedding planes, as breccia fillings and vein replacements, and as disseminations in the various host rocks. The primary ore minerals are sphalerite, pyrite, pyrrhotite, and galena. Barite occurs as massive beds up to 90 meters (300 feet) thick at Red Dog Creek and as nodules, veinlets, and disseminations at Drenchwater Creek. Close spaced soil sampling, mercury vapor sampling, and magnetic and radiometric surveys were conducted over the areas of exposed sulfide mineralization to test the response of these techniques to these types of deposits in northern Alaska. There is potential for additional deposits of this type in the Lisburne Group of the entire northern Brooks Range. These techniques provide a rapid low cost method for the discovery and preliminary evaluation of these types of mineral occurrences in northern Alaska.
    • Bibliography of Arctic Water Resources

      Hartman, Charles W.; Carlson, Robert F. (University of Alaska, Institute of Water Resources, 1970-11)
      In July, 1969, the Institute of Water Resources began a study of Alaska's Arctic water resources in response to the impending resource development of Arctic regions. The intent of the study was to provide a literature review of existing information, a model study of the water system in an Arctic region, and a limited field program. It became quite apparent early in the study that a great amount of literature pertaining to the Arctic water cycle was available and would need extensive organization to be useful. It also became apparent that if the literature were organized, the list would be useful to investigators other than ourselves. The result is this Bibliography of Arctic Water Resources.
    • Bio-Processes of the Oxidation Ditch When Subjected to a Sub-Arctic Climate

      Ranganathan, K. R.; Murphy, R. Sage (University of Alaska, Institute of Water Resources, 1972-05)
      Alaska's far northern area is sparsely populated primarily because of a severe climate which varies from northern temperate to Arctic. Construction and power costs are high. Skilled operating personnel are scarce and expensive, if available. Receiving streams are said to be delicate, particularily in the winter, when little possibility for reaeration exists due to a total ice cover. The oxidation ditch modification of the extended aeration activated sludge process appears to be well suited for the treatment of wastes in this environment. Past operating data on a plant of this type located in Interior Alaska (near Fairbanks) indicated it may be well suited to treat small volumes of domestic waste economically, with low sludge production, and minimal sensitivity to low temperatures.
    • The Biochemical Bases of Psychrophily in Microorganisms: A Review

      Miller, Ann P. (University of Alaska, Institute of Water Resources, 1967)
    • The Biodegradation of Organic Substrates Under Arctic and Subarctic Conditions

      Murray, Ann P.; Murphy, R. Sage (University of Alaska, Institute of Water Resources, 1972-03)
      The objective of this research was to obtain data on the metabolic reaction rates of the microorganisms indigenous to the cold environments of the arctic and sub-arctic in order to evaluate the natural abilities of the freshwater streams and lakes of Alaska to assimilate the wastes discharged into them. Microorganisms capable of growth even at subzero temperatures have long been known; however, most have consistently fared better at higher temperatures, usually above 20° C. Much of the work done with the biological oxidation of wastes at low temperatures has been with organisms of this type : mesophilic organisms which are able to survive at low temperatures but which are metabolically much more active in the temperature range from 20 to 45° C. Such organisms might be labeled "cold-tolerant," but they are probably biochemically quite different from the truly "cold-loving," or psychrophilic, microorganisms which are able not only to survive but also to thrive at temperatures below 20° C and which, in fact, find temperatures much higher than 25° C intolerable.
    • Biogeochemistry of deep lakes in the central Alaskan Range: Completion report

      LaPerriere, Jacqueline; Casper, Lawrence (University of Alaska, Institute of Water Resources, 1976-02)
      Casper, one of the investigators, was a guest of the National Park Service as a weekend camper at the Wonder Lake Campground within Mount McKinley National Park. On the next visit to this campground for the same purpose, Mr. Casper took along several pieces of equipment for making simple limnological measurements. On this trip, he was accompanied by Frederick Payne, a graduate student from Michigan State University, who was in Alaska working with aquatic plant community structure. Following this visit to the lake, a research project proposal was drawn up for the purpose of obtaining funds in order to study several limnological aspects of this lake and others related to it. The relative high importance of vascular aquatic plant production in the Arctic had been noticed by John Hobbie (1973). In an intensive study of a deep subarctic lake, Harding Lake, being conducted by the Institute of Water Resources, University of Alaska, the relative high importance of rooted aquatic plants had also been noted. Thus, a question arose as to whether or not the primary production of vascular aquatic plants is higher than that of phytoplankton in subarctic lakes as is the case in arctic lakes which usually have higher biomass concentrations of algae than subarctic lakes (Hobbie, 1973). The stated objectives of this project were: 1) To conduct a biogeochemical reconnaissance of selected deep subarctic lakes in the central Alaska Range. 2) To develop hypotheses concerning the regional limnology. 3) To collect biological specimens to extend knowledge of taxonomic distributions, especially of aquatic plants and phytoplankton. 4) To estimate the seasonal nutrient budget for these lakes.
    • A Builder's Guide to Water and Energy

      Seifert, Richard D.; Dwight, Linda Perry (University of Alaska, Institute of Water Resources, 1980-08)
    • Carbon Monoxide Exposure and Human Health

      Joy, Richard W.; Tilsworth, Timothy; Williams, Darrell D. (University of Alaska, Institute of Water Resources, 1975-02)
    • A Catalog of Hydroclimatological Data for Alaska's Coastal Zone

      Carlson, Robert F.; Weller, Gunter (University of Alaska, Institute of Water Resources, 1972-05)
      In order to perceive a better understanding of the interrelationships of the coastal zone water we proposed a research project which was to sort out many of the complex variables. The project was not begun due to the lack of sufficient funds. We did, however, begin a limited literature search and listing of hydroclimatological data sources of Alaska's coastal zone. We felt this would be a modest but useful start towards the larger study. It should also have some practical usefulness to others. This data catalog is a result of this initial study. Because of the wide variety of types of agency which collect data and the literally hundreds of sources through which they are reported, it is often quite bewildering for even experienced investigators to sort out what can be found and where. Although we are sure that the catalog is far from complete, we feel that it is a useful beginning towards an attempt to better understand the hydroclimatological processes in Alaska's coastal zone. We wish to invite contributions and criticisms which could lead to an improved and more comprehensive version at some future date.
    • The Characteristics and Ultimate Disposal of Waste Septic Tank Sludge

      Tilsworth, Timothy (University of Alaska, Institute of Water Resources, 1974-11)
    • Characteristics and utilization of fly ash

      Lu, F.C.; Rao, P.D. (University of Alaska Mineral Industry Research Laboratory, 1971)
      Fly ash produced by four power plants in Fairbanks and vicinity was collected and analyzed. Current fly ash specification and potential users of fly ash in general and in the Fairbanks area in particular were evaluated. A detailed bibliography on utilization of fly ash is appended for reference by producers and potential users of fly ash.
    • Characterization and evaluation of washability of Alaskan coals

      Rao, P.D.; Wolff, E.N. (University of Alaska Mineral Industry Research Laboratory, 1980)
      This report is a result of the second part of a continuing study to obtain washability data for Alaskan coals to supplement the efforts of the U.S. Department of Energy in their ongoing studies on washability of U.S. coals.
    • Characterization and evaluation of washability of Alaskan coals - fifty selected seams from various coal fields

      Rao, P.D. (University of Alaska Mineral Industry Research Laboratory, 1986)
      FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT: September 30,1976 to February 28,1986
    • Characterization and evaluation of washability of Alaskan coals - phase i - selected seams from Nenana, Jarvis Creek and Matanuska coal fields

      Rao, P.D.; Wolff, E.N. (University of Alaska Mineral Industry Research Laboratory, 1979)
      This report covers the results of a study conducted to obtain washability data for Alaskan coals to supplement the efforts of the U.S. Department of Energy (formerly U.S. Bureau of Mines) in its ongoing studies on washability of U.S. coals.
    • Characterization and evaluation of washability of Alaskan coals - phase iii, selected seams from the northern Alaska, Nulato, Eagle, Nenana, Broad Pass, Kenai, Beluga, and Chignik coal fields

      Rao, P.D.; Wolff, E.N. (University of Alaska Mineral Industry Research Laboratory, 1982)
      This report is a result of the third part of a continuing study to obtain washability date for Alaskan coals, to supplement the efforts of the U.S. Department of Energy in their ongoing studies on washability of U.S. coals. Washability characteristics were determined for fifteen coal samples from the Northern Alaska, Nulato, Eagle, Nenana, Broad Pass, Kenai, Beluga and Chignik coal fields. The raw coals were crushed to 1-1/2 inches, 2/8 inch and 14 mesh topsizes, and float-sink separations were made at 1.30, 1.40 and 1.70 specific gravities.
    • Characterization and evaluation of washability of Alaskan Coals - phase iv, selected seams from the northern Alaska, Chicago Creek, Unalakleet, Nenana, Matanuska, Beluga, Yentna, and Herendeen Bay coal fields

      Rao, P.D.; Wolff, E.N. (University of Alaska Mineral Industry Research Laboratory, 1982)
      This report is a result of the fourth and final part of a study to obtain washability data for Alaskan coals, to supplement the efforts of the U.S. Department of Energy in their ongoing studies on washability of U.S. coals. Washability characteristics were determined for fifteen coal samples from the Northern Alaska, Chicago Creek, Unalakleet, Nenana, Matanuska, Beluga, Yentna and Herendeen Bay coal fields. The raw coal was crushed to 1 1/2 inches, 3/8 inch and 14 mesh top sizes, and float-sink separations were made at 1.30, 1.40 and 1.60 specific gravities.
    • Characterization and washability studies of raw coal from the Little Tonzona Field, Alaska

      Rao, P.D.; Walsh, D.E.; Phillips, N.; Charlie, K.G. (University of Alaska Mineral Industry Research Laboratory, 1991)
      Coal occurs in an isolated exposure of Tertiary, non-marine sedimentary rocks along the southwest bank of the Little Tonzona River, near Farewell, Alaska. The Little Tonzona River coal field is located approximately 150 air miles northwest of Anchorage, Alaska, and 210 air miles southwest of Fairbanks, Alaska; near the boundaries of Denali National Park. The Alaska Railroad and the Parks Highway are approximately 100 air miles from the coal field at their nearest point. The village of McGrath, on the Kuskokwim River, is located approximately 90 miles to the west (1). An impressive outcrop of coal-bearing Tertiary sediments is exposed for a distance of more than 275 feet on the west bank of the Little Tonzona River (Figure 1). More than seven coal beds, ranging in thickness from 3 feet ta 30 feet, with a cumulative thickness of over 134 feet, are interbedded with clay beds up to 40 feet thick. The clays are fine textured, extremely plastic, light grey to nearly white bentonites andlor tonsteins. Doyon Ltd., an ANSCA Native Corporation, holds land selections covering the inferred limits of the coal field. During 1980 and 1981, Doyon entered into exploration agreements with McIntyre Mines Inc. of Nevada. The two season exploration program took place from June 1,1980 through August 22,1980 and from May 27,1981 through August 22, 1981. During the 1980 field season, geologic mapping, prospecting, stratigraphy, trenching and bulk sampling of all coal outcrops were performed. This produced a total of 34 samples, which were taken for analysis. In 1981, six diamond drill holes with a cumulative length of 2,935 feet were completed. Core recovery was close to 90%, and a total of 147 coal samples, which represented 802.8 cumulative feet of coal, were taken for analysis. The exploration program confirmed a strike length of over 3 miles to the southwest from the main river bank exposure. Northward extension is unknown at this time. Although outcrop exposure is poor away from the river banks, burnout zones resulting from past coal bed fires form a resistant, recognizable on strike feature in the relatively unindurated Tertialy sequence. The appearance of these burnout zones along strike is often the only surface indication of the buried coal-bearing strata. Well preserved plant fossil impressions in the baked clays date the deposit as probable Miocene (2). Coal characterization and washability studies were performed on all coal samples by the Mineral Industry Research Laboratory of the University of Alaska Fairbanks. This work was conducted under the direction of Dr. P.D. Rao, Professor of Coal Technology.
    • Characterization of Alaska's coals

      Rao, P.D. (University of Alaska Mineral Industry Research Laboratory, 1974)
      Coal characterization is a systematic determination of those properties of coal, or of its constituents, that affect its behavior when used. It will help in planning for recovery and use of the extensive Alaskan coal deposits, which have proven reserves of 130 billion tons. This estimate is of necessity based on widely scattered outcrops and meager drill hole data, and the reserves in the Cook Inlet region and the Northern Alaska field are considered to be several fold this figure.
    • Characterization of coal products from high temperature processing of Usibelli low-rank coals

      Rao, P.D.; Walsh, D.E.; Wilson, W.; Li, YuFu (University of Alaska Mineral Industry Research Laboratory, 1991)
      This research project was conducted in association with Gilbert/Commonwealth Inc. as part of an overall techno-economic assessment of high temperature drying of low-rank coals. This report discusses the characteristics of the dried/pyrolyzed products of two high temperature, evaporative processes and the dried product from a hydrothermal process. The long term goal of this and other coal drying studies conducted at MIRL, was to define drying technologies that have significant and real potential to competitively move Alaska's, low-rank coals (LRCs) into the export, steam coal market of the Pacific Rim. In 1990, Japan imported 33 million metric tons (mt) of steam coal with an additional 39 million mt imported by other Far East nations(2). Australia dominates the export steam coal market to these Pacific Rim countries and exported 48 million mt in 1990 and an additional 61 million mt of metallurgical coal(2). The worldwide steam coal export market has been expanding rapidly, from 20 million mt in 1973 to 150 million mt in 1989, and is expected to double to nearly 300 million mt by the end of the century(3). Could Alaska capture only 3% of the projected new world steam coal market, which is not an unreasonable expectation, the value of the state's coal exports would soar from nominally $28 million per year to over $100 million per year. However, without development of economical methods for drying/stabilizing Alaskan LRCs, the only increase in export of Alaskan coals may be from the few "higher rank" coals within a "reasonable" transport range of the existing Alaska rail system or tidewater. Presently the coal from the Usibelli Coal Mine is the only low-rank coal exported internationally as a steam coal; primarily for its blending properties with other coal to improve combustion. But for Alaskan low-rank coals to truly stand on their own merits, economical drying processes must be developed that produce a physically and chemically stable dried product. The technologies that have the most potential for increasing the use of Alaskan coals are those that can reduce the moisture content of these coals economically, and produce a fuel that is accepted in the international market place. Drying technologies will no doubt differ, depending on the end use of the fuel; be it dried lump coal, briquettes or pellets for pulverized coal or stoker applications, or concentrated coal-water fuels made from hot water dried LRCs. There are a number of developing processes that may work with Alaskan coals. Some drying processes, however, have been plagued by the production of excessive amounts of coal fines, Since the demand for Alaskan coal is currently limited to lump size coal, large quantities of fines are a definite liability. In this study, two high temperature drying/pyrolysis processes and one hydrothermal process were investigated. The high temperature drying/pyrolysis processes were conducted at (1) the Western Research Institute, (WRI) an affiliate of the University of Wyoming Research Corporation, Laramie, WY, and (2) Coal Technology Corporation (CTC) of Brisol, VA. Hydrothermal processing was conducted at MIRL, University of Alaska Fairbanks. A summary of these processes and the products they produced follows.
    • Chemical characterization of liquefaction products of an inertinite enriched northern Alaska coals

      Mayasandra, Venugopal (University of Alaska Mineral Industry Research Laboratory, 1989)
      A Northern Alaskan coal rich in inertinites was further enriched by density gradient separations. The degree of condensation of the enriched coal was estimated to be low, mainly 3 ring. The reactivity of the inertinite enriched coal was determined by comparing yields from direct liquefaction with H2 at 0 and 30 minute residence times, 425°C, using an H-donor solvent in one case and moly-catalyst in the other with H2 pressures of 500 and 1000 psig respectively. Solid products were analyzed by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy while the hexane solubles were separated into various chemical classes, viz. alkanes, neutral polycyclic aromatic compounds, hydroxy polycyclic aromatic oxygen heterocycles, and secondary, tertiary amino polycyclic aromatic compounds. The chemical compounds in these fractions were further analyzed by gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (GC-MS)an dcapillary gas chromatography. This work confirmed earlier data showing that inertinites are not as determinental to liquefaction as previously thought.