• Geochemical-geophysical investigations, Fairbanks district

      Heiner, L.E.; Beistline, E.H.; Moody, D.W.; Thomas, B.I.; Wallis, J.E.; Loperfido, J.C.; Peterson, R.J.; Wolff, E.N. (University of Alaska Mineral Industry Research Laboratory, 1967)
      Trace element distribution in a subarctic valley in the Cleary Hill area of the Fairbanks gold district has been studied. Zinc and arsenic have been found excellent pathfinder elements for auriferous deposits. Methods of analysis for copper, lead, zinc, molybdenum, silver and arsenic as well as heavy metals are discussed. The University of Alaska method #2 has been improved, Terrain, slope, and frozen ground have little effect upon the distribution of trace elements associated with the Cleary H i l l vein. A new method for the determination of zinc using dilute acid is proposed. Analysis of geochemical data by trend surface procedures proved effective for localization of anomalies.
    • Geology and Geochemistry of the Ship Creek and Monashka Creek reservoirs, Southcentral Alaska

      Hawkins, Daniel B.; Nelson, Gordon L. (University of Alaska, Institute of Water Resources, 1976-01)
      Graywacke from the Ship Creek watershed, dissolves incongruently in distilled water. The dissolution appears to follow a first-order rate law which in integrated form is: k = -2.303/t log No-Q/No where No is the concentration in ppm of Ca, Mg, Na or K in the graywacke, Q is the total quantity of these ions leached in time t(days), k is the rate constant in days-1. Experimentally derived rate constants for the dissolution of graywacke in distilled water at 5oC are log k+2CA, -4.128 day-1; log k+2Mg, -6.174 day-1; log k+Na, -5.800 day-1; and log k+K, -5.249 day-1. The above constants are for 40 to +100 mesh graywacke. A surface area correction term must be inserted in the above equation if it is applied to a different size fraction. Using the above equation and rate constants, the chemical composition of a water in contact with graywacke was calculated. With the exception of magnesium, the agreement between the calculated composition and that of Ship Creek water was good. Assuming that the groundwater in the Ship Creek watershed contacts about 1.5X104cm2 graywacke per liter, 120 to 360 days are required at 5oC to produce the concentration of ions observed in Ship Creek. Release of exchangeable H+ from the soil mat to the reservoir water will not significant1y lower the pH of the water. Leaching of heavy metals from sulfides contained in the bedrock of the two watersheds does not pose a water quality hazard. Lineaments in the bedrock at Monashka Creek may provide channels through which water may seep from the reservoir. These are not expected to pose a problem in retaining water in the reservoir, but they may result in small, new springs down grade from the reservoir.
    • Geology of a subarctic, tin-bearing batholith - Circle Hot Springs, Alaska

      Wilkinson, Kathy (University of Alaska Mineral Industry Research Laboratory, 1987)
      A small batholith (56mi2) outcrops approximately 94 miles northeast of Fairbanks. It occurs in a historically rich area for placer gold. Additionally, placer tin has been recorded in the creeks that flow through or adjacent to the batholith.
    • Geophysical and Biological Reconnaissance of Rock Habitats in Western Camden Bay, Beaufort Sea, Alaska

      Dunton, K. H.; Schonberg, S. V.; Schell, Donald M. (University of Alaska, Institute of Water Resources, 1983-05)
      This report presents the results of a 10-day geophysical and biological survey in western Camden Bay, in the Alaskan Beaufort Sea. The primary objective of this survey was to confirm the existence of boulders and cobbles on the seafloor as reported by Barnes (1981, 1982). The survey area extended from the eastern edge of the Canning River (mud flat area) to Kangigivik Point and seaward to the 14m contour line (Fig. 1). A solid boundary of pack ice prevented any survey work seaward of the 14m contour. We had proposed to examine the seabed to the 18m contour.
    • Glacial Processes and Their Relationship to Streamflow Flute Glacier, Alaska

      Long, William E. (University of Alaska, Institute of Water Resources, 1972-01)
      Flute Glacier is located at the head of the South Fork of Eagle River, Alaska, about twenty air-miles east northeast of Anchorage. It is a small north-facing glacier, approximately two miles long and half a mile wide, situated in a deep glacial valley (see Figure 1). Elevations on the glacier range from 3,500 feet at the terminous to 5,800 feet at the top of the accumulation area. Water from Flute Glacier becomes the South Fork of Eagle River, draining about 32 square miles of area compared to a 192 square mile drainage basin for Eagle River. Limited discharge measurements made during October 1968 suggest that the South Fork contributes about 20% of the water flowing down Eagle River. Glacial meltwater forms an important percentage of the waters of the Eagle River system. Glaciers feeding the main Eagle River are large, complex and difficult to study. Flute Glacier, relatively small and of simple plan, was selected for study because of its small size and proximity to the metropolitan area of Anchorage. Water from the Eagle River system is presently included in the plans for future water supply for Anchorage. The Eagle River valley up to the 500 ft contour is a federal power reserve. The climate of the area surrounding Flute Glacier is alpine with cool temperatures and higher than average precipitation for the area. All the glacier is above treeline so no plant life is obvious. Mountain sheep inhabit the sharp alpine peaks surrounding the glacier.
    • Ground Water Quality Effects on Domestic Water Utilization

      Smith, Daniel W.; Casper, Lawrence A. (University of Alaska, Institute of Water Resources, 1974-03)
    • A Ground Water Quality Summary for Alaska: a Termination Report

      Kim, Steve W.; Johnson, Phillip R.; Murphy, R. Sage (University of Alaska, Institute of Water Resources, 1969)
      The expanding economic activity throughout the State of Alaska has created an urgent demand for water resource data. Ground water quality information is of particular interest since this is the most used source for domestic and industrial supplies. Many agencies and individuals have accumulated large quantities of data but their value has been marginal due to a lack of distribution to potential users. It was the original intent of the work reported herein to gather, collate, and publish all ground water quality data available in the files of university, state, and federal laboratories. Soon after the inception of the project the major contributor, the U.S. Geological Survey, found it was administratively impossible to contribute either the monies or the data necessary to accomplish the ultimate goals of the project -- An Atlas on Alaskan Ground Water Qualities. At the time the above decision was made the Institute felt too much information was on hand to allow it to lay fallow. Therefore, this report was prepared, In a more limited scope than originally planned, to fill the need for a readily available source of information.
    • Ground Water: Alaska's Hidden Resource: Proceedings

      Ashton, William S. (University of Alaska, Institute of Water Resources, 1989-03)
      Surface water quality -- Surface/ground water interactions -- Ground water monitoring, modeling, and data management -- Transport and removal of contaminants in soil and ground water
    • Handbook for the Alaskan Prospector

      Wolff, Ernest (Mineral Industry Research Laboratory, University of Alaska, Fairbanks, 1969)
      It is hoped that this book will be of value to many different classes of men engaged in the search for mineral deposits. These classes might include the experienced practical prospector who would like to learn something of geology; the young geologist who needs information on practical prospecting; the novice who needs a comprehensive reference; and the all around experienced exploration engineer or geologist who might need to refer to some specialized technique, look up a reference in the bibliography, or read a resume of the geology of a particular area, Because this book is aimed at so many different classes, different chapters are written assuming different levels of learning and experience. This, no doubt, will prove troublesome at times, but it is believed to be the best way to insure that the information contained in each chapter will reach with maximum effectiveness the group for whom it is intended.
    • Handbook of geophysical prospecting methods for the Alaskan prospector

      Heiner, L.E. (University of Alaska Mineral Industry Research Laboratory, 1969)
      This Handbook has been compiled to acquaint the Alaskan prospector with the more recent application of geophysics for locating economic metallic minerals. For this reason, well documented subjects such as the use of the dip needle and mineral detectors have been excluded.
    • Heat and Mass Transfer in Cold Regions Soils

      Kane, Douglas L.; Luthin, James N.; Taylor, George S. (University of Alaska, Institute of Water Resources, 1975-06)
    • Heavy minerals in Alaskan beach sand deposits

      Cook, D.J. (University of Alaska Mineral Industry Research Laboratory, 1969)
      Beach sand deposits along Alaska's shoreline have been prospected and worked for their precious metal content since the time of Russian occupation. Areas such as the Nome Beaches of the Seward Peninsula have been very productive, and in recent years exploration has proceded to include off shore extensions of these deposits. Evaluation of associated heavy mineral contents of these deposits, however, have been cursory and in most cases neglected entirely. In view of the thousands of miles of Alaskan coastline with known mineral provinces on adjacent land; much information is needed concerning the origin of mineral constituents, evaluation of past and present beach deposits and possibilities of off shore extensions of tho continental shelf. This report is concerned with samples of beach sand material submitted to the Mineral Industry Research Laboratory by individuals. These samples, taken from various locations, cannot be viewed as programs designed to delineate reserves from the respective areas. They should be considered as reconnaissance samples to indicate the mineral constituents present and the need for more comprehensive evaluation. Systematic and complete evaluation of all mineral constituents, including precious materials, is a major undertaking because of the erratic nature of the deposits. Special studies are required concerning sampling techniques, mining methods, recovery systems and marketing procedures. It is, therefore, beyond the financial capabilities of most individuals and requires the involvement of government agencies or corporations to obtain the necessary data to determine economic feasibility .
    • A Historical Survey of Water Utilization in the Cook Inlet - Susitna Basin, Alaska

      Hunt, William R. (University of Alaska, Institute of Water Resources, 1978-06)
      The objectives of the study encompassed a scholarly investigation of the appropriate archival and published literature on the Cook-Inlet-Susitna Basin, and the publication of the articles and a book-length history of the utilization of water resources. There are many aspects of Alaskan history to which historians have not given serious attention. Certainly there has been no historical consideration of the importance of water resources in Alaska. Issues that have involved water use have either been treated journalistically or have been the subject of scientific monographs. The understanding of the public can sometimes be confused by the journalistic treatment of events while scientific reports are seldom read. There is a definite need for a well-researched, lively survey of an important spect of Alaska's history. Many years passed before systematic scientific work was carried out in the Cook Inlet-Susitna region but the uses of its water resources for sanitation, transport, food, and power were intensified as time passed. The region has had significance for well over 200 years to the western peoples who settled there and, of course, for much longer to its aboriginal inhabitants. There has never been a substantial history written of the region, although some aspects of its past have been surveyed in a few pub1ished works, and there has never been a historical survey of water utilization for any region of Alaska. Increasingly, the development of the region will involve political decision. The public scrutiny of the environmental impact of new dam and other construction is not likely to decline. Further petroleum leasing in the outer continental shelf areas will raise questions of the best uses which can be made of the water and other resources. The wisdom of these decisions depends upon our knowledge of all of the factors involved. An understanding of what has happened in the past as people have made use of the water resources could contribute to the effectiveness of judgments made in the future.
    • History of Alaskan Operations of United States Smelting, Refining and Mining Company

      Boswell, John C. (Mineral Industries Research Laboratory, University of Alaska, Fairbanks, 1979-03)
    • Hydrogeochemistry of the Caribou-Poker Creeks Research Watershed

      Hawkins, Daniel B.; Glover, David M. (University of Alaska, Institute of Water Resources, 1982-03)
      Bedrock of the Caribou-Poker Creeks Research Watershed dissolves incongruently with a first-order rate constant of about 5 x 10-6 day-1 at 5° C. The resulting solution is potassium-calcium-magnesium rich. The soil-plant environment acts on this solution through sorption of potassium and by evapotranspiration to yield a solution that is relatively depleted in potassium and enriched in calcium and magnesium, but with the same molar ratio of Ca:Mg as the fluid from the rock dissolution. This fluid from the soil-plant reservoir is the dominant contributor of ions to stream waters. Using the discriminant functions obtained by multiple discriminant analysis DPKR = 0.572Si02 + 0.240Ca + 2.89Mg - 0.384Na + 0.452N03 - 9.18 DCRB = 0.913Si02 + 0.042Ca + 1.28Mg + 1.17Na + 4.63N03 - 7.27, the waters of Caribou Creek and Poker Creek can be distinguished on the basis of chemical composition. In general, Poker Creek waters are slightly more concentrated than Caribou Creek waters. On the average, 1.4 x 10^13g H20/year leaves the watershed as surface water. At an average calcium concentration of 14 ppm for the water, 0.1% for the bedrock, and a watershed area of 46 mi^2, this flow corresponds to a maximum loss of about 17 metric tons of rock per hectare per year.
    • Hydrologic Properties of Subarctic Organic Soils

      Kane, Douglas L.; Seifert, Richard D.; Taylor, George S. (University of Alaska, Institute of Water Resources, 1978-01)
      The need for understanding the natural system and how it responds to various stresses is important; this is especially so in an environment where the climate not only sustains permafrost, but develops massive seasonal frost as well. Consequently, the role of the shallow surface organic layer is also quite important. Since a slight change in the soil thermal regime may bring about a phase change in the water or ice, therefore, the system response to surface alterations such as burning can be quite severe. The need for a better understanding of the behavior and properties of the organic layer is, therefore, accentuated. The central theme of this study was the examination of the hydrologic and hydraulic properties of subarctic organic soils. Summarized in this paper are the results of three aspects of subarctic organic soil examinations conducted during the duration of the project. First, a field site was set up in Washington Creek with the major emphasis on measuring numerous variables of that soil system during the summer. The greatest variations in moisture content occur in the thick organic soils that exist at this site. Our major emphasis was to study the soil moisture levels in these soils. This topic is covered in the first major section, including associated laboratory studies. Those laboratory studies include investigations of several hydraulic and hydrologic properties of taiga organic and mineral soils. Second, some field data on organic moisture levels was collected at the site of prescribed burns in Washington Creek to ascertain the sustainability of fires as a function of moisture levels. This portion of the study is described under the second major heading. The last element of this study was a continued application of the two-dimensional flow model that was developed in an earlier study funded by the U. S. Forest Service, Institute of Northern Forestry, and reported by Kane, Luthin, and Taylor (1975a). Many of the results and concepts gathered in the field work were integrated into the modeling effort, which is aimed at producing better estimates of the hydrologic effects of surface disturbances in the black spruce taiga subarctic ecosystem. This knowledge should also contribute to better fire management decisions of the same system.
    • Hydrological Interpretation of Basin Morphology

      Fox, John D. (University of Alaska, Institute of Water Resources, 1978-08)
      Hydrologic processes in a particular basin are governed by three groups of factors: input regimes of mass and energy, the nature of mass and energy transfer and transformation, and the biophysical characteristics of the basin. This third group provides the structural or morphological framework in which hydrologic processes are taking place and, as such, contributes significantly to the uniqueness of specific basin response.
    • Hydrology of the Central Arctic River Basins of Alaska

      Kane, Douglas L.; Carlson, Robert F. (University of Alaska, Institute of Water Resources, 1973-12)
    • Hydrometallurgy of complex sulfide ores, process development

      Rao, P.D. (University of Alaska Mineral Industry Research Laboratory, 1988)
      In 1984, Nerco Minerals Co. signed a cooperative agreement with the University of Alaska to conduct hydrometallurgical research. The principle objective of the agreement was to conduct bench scale research to study the problems of leaching the sulfide ore and the recovery of its valuable metals. Nerco has provided funding on an annual basis. Information contained in this publication is a result of this research.
    • Hydrometallurgy of the delta sulfide ores, first stage report

      Letwoski, F.; Chous, Kuo-tung; Rao, P.D. (University of Alaska Mineral Industry Research Laboratory, 1986)
      This report presents the results of hydrometallurgical research carried out from September 16, 1985 to June 30, 1986 on metals recovery from complex sulfide ores from the Delta deposit near Tok, Alaska. The leaching characteristics performed for 6 different ore samples indicate that the most valuable components form the following order: Zn > Au > Pb > Ag > Cu > So. Further study demonstrates that direct leaching of the ore is effective both in chloride as well as in sulfate oxidizing solutions coupled with separating of leached solid components by flotation. Three variants of the ore processing with ferric chloride or fenic sulfate leaching are analyzed: one flowsheet with direct ore leaching in ferric chloride solution followed by leaching-flotation step, with subsequent zinc separation in a solvent extraction step and electrolysis in chloride solution; and two flowsheets of direct ore leaching with ferric sulfate solution followed by a leaching-flotation step, with zinc sulfate electrolysis and other metals recovery in chloride leaching sreps. In two last flowsheets silver is recovered during the chloride leaching steps and gold h m flotation products during the cyanide leaching. Preliminary economic and technical evaluation is presented. The engineering study on apparatus for the fast leaching- flotation processing and on better accumulation of gold and silver in one semi-product are concluded for the next year of research.