• Uranium exploration methodology in cold climates

      Sims, J.M. (University of Alaska Mineral Industry Research Laboratory, 1980-03)
      The uranium prospecting boom of the past decade had, as a major consequence, the rapid development and proliferation of exploration methods for source materials. Numerous established methods were developed and refined whilst new techniques were introduced proving, in some instances, to be highly successful. To the explorationist the proliferation of instrumental hardware and detection systems was something of a headache with the result that in uranium exploration, more so than in other types of prospecting, the choice of exploration method at the appropriate stage of prospecting was frequently ill founded. The situation also spawned ‘black box’ purveyors who made extravagant claims for their equipment. Money was wasted through over kill applications of exploration method accompanied in many instances by deficiencies in the interpretation of results. This project was originally conceived as a means of evaluating, reviewing and filtering from a burgeoning array of systems the most appropriate exploration techniques applicable to cold climate environments. This goal has been trimmed somewhat since it had been hoped to incorporate site investigation data assembled in the field by the writer as appropriate case history material. This was not possible and as a consequence this report is a 'state of the art review' of the applicability of currently available techniques in Arctic and Subarctic environments. Reference is made to published case history data, where appropriate, supportive of the techniques or methods reviewed.
    • The use of flocculants to control turbidity in placer mining effluents

      Shen, Yun-Hwei (University of Alaska Mineral Industry Research Laboratory, 1987)
      In this study, two placer mine discharge waters of different characteristics were tested in order to determine the applicability of organic polymer flocculants to achieve reduced levels of turbidity. The water samples from both mines were characterized both as to their chemical and physical properties. The jar test was employed to establish the optimum operation conditions of the flocculation process. The best results were obtained employing a cationic polymer Superfloc 340 produced by American Cyanamid Company. The optimum dosage for water samples from both mines were 15 ppm and 40 ppm respectively. Optimum agitation time was within the range of 3 to 9 minutes depending on the agitation rate and the pulp density of water sample. The utilization of settling ponds, in conjunction with flocculation is believed to be a practical method to control the turbidity level of placer mine discharge water.
    • User's guide for atmospheric carbon monoxide transport model

      Norton, William R.; Carlson, Robert F. (University of Alaska, Institute of Water Resources, 1976-06)
      In the winter months of Fairbanks, Alaska, a highly stable air temperature inversion creates high levels of carbon monoxide (CO) concentrations. As an aid to understanding this problem, a CO transport computer model has been created which provides a useful tool when used in conjunction with other measurement and analytic studies of traffic, meteorology, emissions control, zoning, and parking management. The model is completely documented and illustrated with several examples. Named ACOSP (Atmospheric CO Simulation Program), it predicts expected CO concentrations within a specific geographic area for a defined set of CO sources. At the present time, the model is programmed to consider automobile emissions as the major CO source and may include estimates of stationary sources. The model is coded for computer solution in the FORTRAN programming language and uses the finite-element method of numerical solution of the basic convective-diffusion equations. Although it has a potential for real-time analysis and control, at the present time the model will be most valuable for investigating and understanding the physical processes which are responsible for high CO levels and for testing remedial control measures at high speed and low cost.
    • Using polyethylene as a coagulant for reducing turbidity from placer mining discharge

      Fan, Ray-Her (University of Alaska Mineral Industry Research Laboratory, 1987)
      Placer gold mining locations on Gilmore and Crooked Creeks in the Fairbanks and Central/Circle, Alaska areas, respectively, were chosen as study sites for evaluation of a unique water treatment process. The physical and chemical impacts on water quality by placer mining were investigated by measuring the pH value, turbidity, and solids content of the slurry samples. Sedimentation tests, zeta potential measurements, and particle size distribution analyses were conducted as well. Also analyzed were mineralogical and chemical composition of the suspended ultrafine particles. Flocculation tests using polyethylene oxide (PEO) with adjunct additives were conducted in the laboratory. Variable parameters such as mixing speed and time, reagent dosages, pH values, as well as synergistic factors were studied. Economic factors and chemical consumption were evaluated and a field treatment plant was designed and proposed.
    • Washability characteristics of low-volatile bituminous coal from the Bering River field, Alaska

      Rao, P.D. (University of Alaska Mineral Industry Research Laboratory, 1969)
      Two samples of low-volatile bituminous coal from Bering River Coal Field were sized to 0.525" x 3, 3 x 6, 6 x 10, 10 x 20, and 20 x 35 mesh and their washability characteristics studied at specific gravities ranging from 1.29 to 1.55. The results showed that the coals can be up-graded to an ash content as low as 2% with conventional cyclone heavy media process. A product containing less than 1% ash can be obtained from these coals with surprisingly high yields, ranging from 50 to 95% depending on the ash content desired in the washed coal, and the characteristics of the raw coal. The experimental work proves the technical feasibility of preparation of the coal form metallurgical use and as low ash carbon raw material. Further Pilot Plant testing would be required in the fields of preparation and utilization in order to design the final plant for ascertaining the economic feasibility.
    • Water Balance of a Small Lake in a Permafrost Region

      Hartman, Charles W.; Carlson, Robert F. (University of Alaska, Institute of Water Resources, 1973-09)
    • A Water Distribution System for Cold Regions: The Single Main Recirculation Method: An Historical Review, Field Evaluation, and Suggested Design Procedures

      Murphy, R. Sage; Hartman, Charles W. (University of Alaska, Institute of Water Resources, 1969-03)
      Students and residents of the Arctic are familiar with the many problems peculiar to the geographical area. This monograph will consider an adequate, safe, and reliable water distribution system. Water supply, together with housing, transportation, and waste disposal, are demanded when a remote area becomes established as a permanent settlement. As long as the population of the North was widely distributed in small mining camps, villages, and individual cabins, water distribution systems were not necessary, as shallow wells and nearby streams adequately served most needs. With the rapidly increasing settlement of the vast lands of the North, the population is being centered in communities rather than distributed over large areas. The world population explosion will undoubtedly contribute to increasing immigration into Arctic and sub-Arctic areas. These changes have already created a need for modern water distribution systems, a need which will become more critical with time.
    • Water Quality in Alaskan Campgrounds

      Murphy, R. Sage (University of Alaska, Institute of Water Resources, 1973-01)
      This report presents an evaluation of water quality in Alaskan Campgrounds using laboratory determinations and on-site evaluations. In general, ground water quality was found to be excellent and surface water quality unacceptable for human consumption and total body contact recreation. The most pressing need was found to be the provision of an approved drinking water supply for each campground. The· environmental health aspects of campgrounds were found to be largely neglected. Many of the sewage systems are inadequate resulting in pollution of the ground and surface water. Solid waste was found to be stored and disposed of by unacceptable methods. Finally, many campgrounds are located in swampy areas or located in areas subject to annual flooding.
    • Water Quality in the Great Land, Alaska's Challenge: Proceedings

      Huntsinger, Ronald G. (University of Alaska, Institute of Water Resources, 1987-10)
      Administering water quality programs -- Surface water issues -- Groundwater issues -- Sediments and resource development
    • Water/Wastewater Evaluation for an Arctic Alaskan Industrial Camp

      Tilsworth, Timothy (University of Alaska, Institute of Water Resources, 1973-04)
      Discovery of a huge oil field at Prudhoe Bay in the late 1960's resulted in a great deal of industrial activity on the North Slope of arctic Alaska. This flurry of industrial activity was accompanied by environmental concern across the nation. The fact that Alaska was "the last frontier” placed it high on the list for ecological scrutiny.
    • Winter soil water dynamics: Completion report

      Kane, D. L. (University of Alaska, Institute of Water Resources, 1975-12)
      The movement of soil moisture through cold regions soils is an active process that continues throughout the year. It represents one mechanism of heat transport in subsurface soil, conduction being the main mode of heat flow. In frozen soils, this moisture may undergo phase change resulting in two significant events: 1. deformation of the near-surface layer, and 2. liberation or uptake of heat at the point of phase change. Where deformation (induced by either frost heaving or thaw consolidation) occurs in man-made embankments, it is readily apparent at the surface. Restoration of the deformed surface requires large sums of money.
    • Zeolite deposits of possible economic significance on the northern Alaska Peninsula

      Madonna, J.A. (University of Alaska Mineral Industry Research Laboratory, 1982)
      Clinoptilolite, mordenite, haulandite and laumontite have been identified in possible economic concentrations on the Alaska Peninsula. Most important are 1) a haulandite bearing water-laid tuff on Agate Island, 2) a thick sequence of terrestrial volcanics containing mordenite and clinoptilolite located between Squirrel Point and Tommy Creek, 3) water-laid tuffs containing high concentrations of clinoptilolite near Dennis Creek and 4) a haulandite bearing siltstone at Chinitna Bay. Zeolite formation in the Iliamna Lake area was produced in "open" systems of fresh water lakes and ground water systems which have transformed vitric volcanic material into zeolites. Burial diagenesis is responsible for alteration of early formed, low temperature-pressure zeolites into high temperature-pressure varieties. The formation of laumontite in a tuffaceous sandstone at Chinitna Bay was the result of low grade burial metamorphism. The mode of formation of haulandite in a welded tuff and siltstone unit, also located at Chinitna Bay, appears to have resulted from diagensis alteration of terrestrial sediments. Transportation of zeolite ore from Iliamna Lake would be by lake to Pile Bay Village then by road to Iliamna Bay and, finally, by ship to the consumer. In the Chinitna Bay area ore can be loaded directly onto ships for transportation to the consumer.