• Application of hydrocyclones for the treatment of wastewater in gold placer mining

      Lin, H.K. (University of Alaska Mineral Industry Research Laboratory, 1980)
      This is a report on experimental application of hydrocyclones for the wastewater treatment in placer mining, with emphasis on their use in combination with a kind of large molecular weight flocculant. The simultaneous flocculating and clarifying of placer mining effluents was tested and evaluated.
    • Application of palynological techniques for correlation of coal seams in the Lower Lignite Creek area, Nenana Coal Field

      McFarlane, R., Sanders, R., and Rao, P.D. (University of Alaska Mineral Industry Research Laboratory, 1980-03)
      This study concerns spores and pollen in the coals of the lower Lignite Creek area in the Nenana Coal Field, which is operated by Usibelli Mining Company. The seams studied are part of the Suntrana Formation which contains a large portion of the coal reserves of Nenana coal. These coals are mid-Miocene in age and are separated from each other by cyclic sandstone, clay and silt deposits, which reflect alternating periods of coal forming swamps and depositing streams. A preliminary study of the mega and micro botanical fossils of this area was made in 1969 by Wolfe and Leopold (Wahrhaftig et al, 1969). Palynological investigation was done on 26 samples of the Suntrana Formation and evidence from this and fossil leaves indicate that the formation should be placed in the Seldovian stage.
    • Application of portable delayed neutron activation analysis equipment in the evaluation of gold deposits

      Sims, J.M. (University of Alaska Mineral Industry Research Laboratory, 1980-03)
      The attributes of a gold analysis system which could act as a panacea for the needs of the explorationist and the miner alike would include: i) The capability of being used as a qualitative as well as a quantitative tool yielding accurate results in respect of large samples. ii) The capability of generating results on site either in the field or within a prospect or mine. iii) An identifiable cost effectiveness in relation to other methods. iv) The capability of being housed in an equipment package which combines ruggedness, portability and reliability with operational options which permit measurements to be made on outcrops, mine faces, borehole cores as well as direct in-situ down-the hole determinations. The portable x-ray fluorescence gold analyser is on the threshold of meeting all the criteria cited above. Since the system is non-destructive in so far as the sample is concerned check assays employing conventional techniques can be run on a small percentage of the sample population. This report by its very nature is a state of the art review which sets out to describe the current instrument package, the principles by which it functions, its performance compared with detailed chip channel sampling and then suggests how the system may evolve in terms of its application to the investigation of hard-rock and placer deposits.
    • Application of the Finite-Element Method for Simulation of Surface Water Transport Problems

      Guymon, Gary L. (University of Alaska, Institute of Water Resources, 1972-06)
    • Applications of trend surface analysis and geologic model building to mineralized districts in Alaska

      Heiner, L.E.; Wolff, E.N. (University of Alaska Mineral Industry Research Laboratory, 1967)
      The Mineral Industry Research Laboratory, University of Alaska, has investigated the application of computers and statistics to mineral deposits in Alaska. Existing programs have been adapted and new ones written for the computers available at the University. The methods tested are trend surface analysis and geologic model making. An existing coeffecient of association program was converted to Fortran IV , but was not applied to an Alaskan problem. A trend surface is a mathematically describable surface that most closely approximates a surface representing observed data. In geologic model making, regression analysis is used to determine what geologic features are significant as ore controls. Coefficient of association compares samples to each other on the basis of a variable being present or absent. Trend surfaces were computed for dips and s t r i k e s of geologic features ( v e i n s , f a u l t s , bedrock) for Southeastern Alaska, the Chichagof district , and the Hyder district . Results for the f i r s t two are presented as maps. Trend surfaces and residual maps were prepared for geochemical data from the Slana district, Alaska. A mineral occurrence model was made for a portion of the Craig Quadrangle, and potential values were computed for c e l l s in the area. Appraisals of potential values by five geologists are compared with those of the model. An IBM 1620 multiple regression program is included.
    • Arsenic in the Water, Soil Bedrock, and Plants of the Ester Dome Area of Alaska

      Hawkins, Daniel B.; Forbes, Robert B.; Hok, Charlotte I.; Dinkel, Donald (University of Alaska, Institute of Water Resources, 1982-06)
      Concentrations of arsenic as large as 10 ppm (200 times the safe limit for drinking water) occur in the groundwater of a mineralized residential area near Fairbanks. Bedrock of the area contains 750 ppm As, primarily as arsenopyrite and scorodite. The oxygen-poor groundwater is enriched in As(III) and ferrous iron while the surface waters are iron free and contain less than 50 ppb As(V). Arsenic is removed from the water by coprecipitation with ferric hydroxide. Some iron-rich stream sediments contain as much as 1,400 ppm arsenic. The distribution of arsenic in the groundwater is controlled by the distribution of arsenic in the bedrock. The arsenic content of the B soil horizon over mineralized veins is about 150 ppm, while that over barren rock is 30 ppm. The vegetation over the veins is not significantly enriched in arsenic. Lettuce, radishes and tomatoes grown with arsenic-rich water (5 ppm) contain 16, 8 and 1 ppm As, respectively; these amounts are significantly greater than plants not treated with arsenic. Preliminary studies by state and federal health agencies show no detrimental effects on the health of persons drinking these arsenic-rich waters.
    • An Atmospheric carbon monoxide transport model for Fairbanks, Alaska

      Carlson, Robert F.; Fox, John (University of Alaska, Institute of Water Resources, 1976-06)
      A comprehensive computer model of atmospheric carbon monoxide transport has been developed for Fairbanks, Alaska. The model, based on a finite element method computational scheme, accents input from specified vehicle traffic parameters inc1uding miles per day, number of cold starts, and total idle time. The carbon monoxide concentrations are calculated for specified time intervals at numerous points throughout the urban area. A test of the model against the data of January 22, 1975, indicates a good correspondence. Extremely high carbon monoxide concentration were calculated at an unmeasured point down wind of the business district. The model should prove useful for a number of community needs including parking management, planning and zoning, episode strategy planning, and carbon monoxide forecasting.
    • Baseline geochemical studies for resource evaluation of D-2 Lands - geophysical and geochemical investigations at the Red Dog and Drenchwater Creek mineral occurrences

      Metz, P.A., Robinson, M.S., and Lueck, L. (University of Alaska Mineral Industry Research Laboratory, 1979)
      Major zinc, lead and barite mineralization has been discovered at Red Dog and Drenchwater Creeks in the DeLong Mountains of north-western Alaska. The host rocks for the mineral occurrences are carbonates, cherts, shales, and dacitic volcanic rocks of the Mississippian Lisburne Group. The host rocks are deformed in a narrow belt of imbricate thrust sheets that extend from the Canadian border to the Chukchi Sea. The rocks strike generally east-west and dip to the south. The sulfide minerals occur as stratiform mineralization parallel to bedding planes, as breccia fillings and vein replacements, and as disseminations in the various host rocks. The primary ore minerals are sphalerite, pyrite, pyrrhotite, and galena. Barite occurs as massive beds up to 90 meters (300 feet) thick at Red Dog Creek and as nodules, veinlets, and disseminations at Drenchwater Creek. Close spaced soil sampling, mercury vapor sampling, and magnetic and radiometric surveys were conducted over the areas of exposed sulfide mineralization to test the response of these techniques to these types of deposits in northern Alaska. There is potential for additional deposits of this type in the Lisburne Group of the entire northern Brooks Range. These techniques provide a rapid low cost method for the discovery and preliminary evaluation of these types of mineral occurrences in northern Alaska.
    • Bibliography of Arctic Water Resources

      Hartman, Charles W.; Carlson, Robert F. (University of Alaska, Institute of Water Resources, 1970-11)
      In July, 1969, the Institute of Water Resources began a study of Alaska's Arctic water resources in response to the impending resource development of Arctic regions. The intent of the study was to provide a literature review of existing information, a model study of the water system in an Arctic region, and a limited field program. It became quite apparent early in the study that a great amount of literature pertaining to the Arctic water cycle was available and would need extensive organization to be useful. It also became apparent that if the literature were organized, the list would be useful to investigators other than ourselves. The result is this Bibliography of Arctic Water Resources.
    • Bio-Processes of the Oxidation Ditch When Subjected to a Sub-Arctic Climate

      Ranganathan, K. R.; Murphy, R. Sage (University of Alaska, Institute of Water Resources, 1972-05)
      Alaska's far northern area is sparsely populated primarily because of a severe climate which varies from northern temperate to Arctic. Construction and power costs are high. Skilled operating personnel are scarce and expensive, if available. Receiving streams are said to be delicate, particularily in the winter, when little possibility for reaeration exists due to a total ice cover. The oxidation ditch modification of the extended aeration activated sludge process appears to be well suited for the treatment of wastes in this environment. Past operating data on a plant of this type located in Interior Alaska (near Fairbanks) indicated it may be well suited to treat small volumes of domestic waste economically, with low sludge production, and minimal sensitivity to low temperatures.
    • The Biochemical Bases of Psychrophily in Microorganisms: A Review

      Miller, Ann P. (University of Alaska, Institute of Water Resources, 1967)
    • The Biodegradation of Organic Substrates Under Arctic and Subarctic Conditions

      Murray, Ann P.; Murphy, R. Sage (University of Alaska, Institute of Water Resources, 1972-03)
      The objective of this research was to obtain data on the metabolic reaction rates of the microorganisms indigenous to the cold environments of the arctic and sub-arctic in order to evaluate the natural abilities of the freshwater streams and lakes of Alaska to assimilate the wastes discharged into them. Microorganisms capable of growth even at subzero temperatures have long been known; however, most have consistently fared better at higher temperatures, usually above 20° C. Much of the work done with the biological oxidation of wastes at low temperatures has been with organisms of this type : mesophilic organisms which are able to survive at low temperatures but which are metabolically much more active in the temperature range from 20 to 45° C. Such organisms might be labeled "cold-tolerant," but they are probably biochemically quite different from the truly "cold-loving," or psychrophilic, microorganisms which are able not only to survive but also to thrive at temperatures below 20° C and which, in fact, find temperatures much higher than 25° C intolerable.
    • Biogeochemistry of deep lakes in the central Alaskan Range: Completion report

      LaPerriere, Jacqueline; Casper, Lawrence (University of Alaska, Institute of Water Resources, 1976-02)
      Casper, one of the investigators, was a guest of the National Park Service as a weekend camper at the Wonder Lake Campground within Mount McKinley National Park. On the next visit to this campground for the same purpose, Mr. Casper took along several pieces of equipment for making simple limnological measurements. On this trip, he was accompanied by Frederick Payne, a graduate student from Michigan State University, who was in Alaska working with aquatic plant community structure. Following this visit to the lake, a research project proposal was drawn up for the purpose of obtaining funds in order to study several limnological aspects of this lake and others related to it. The relative high importance of vascular aquatic plant production in the Arctic had been noticed by John Hobbie (1973). In an intensive study of a deep subarctic lake, Harding Lake, being conducted by the Institute of Water Resources, University of Alaska, the relative high importance of rooted aquatic plants had also been noted. Thus, a question arose as to whether or not the primary production of vascular aquatic plants is higher than that of phytoplankton in subarctic lakes as is the case in arctic lakes which usually have higher biomass concentrations of algae than subarctic lakes (Hobbie, 1973). The stated objectives of this project were: 1) To conduct a biogeochemical reconnaissance of selected deep subarctic lakes in the central Alaska Range. 2) To develop hypotheses concerning the regional limnology. 3) To collect biological specimens to extend knowledge of taxonomic distributions, especially of aquatic plants and phytoplankton. 4) To estimate the seasonal nutrient budget for these lakes.
    • A Builder's Guide to Water and Energy

      Seifert, Richard D.; Dwight, Linda Perry (University of Alaska, Institute of Water Resources, 1980-08)
    • Carbon Monoxide Exposure and Human Health

      Joy, Richard W.; Tilsworth, Timothy; Williams, Darrell D. (University of Alaska, Institute of Water Resources, 1975-02)
    • A Catalog of Hydroclimatological Data for Alaska's Coastal Zone

      Carlson, Robert F.; Weller, Gunter (University of Alaska, Institute of Water Resources, 1972-05)
      In order to perceive a better understanding of the interrelationships of the coastal zone water we proposed a research project which was to sort out many of the complex variables. The project was not begun due to the lack of sufficient funds. We did, however, begin a limited literature search and listing of hydroclimatological data sources of Alaska's coastal zone. We felt this would be a modest but useful start towards the larger study. It should also have some practical usefulness to others. This data catalog is a result of this initial study. Because of the wide variety of types of agency which collect data and the literally hundreds of sources through which they are reported, it is often quite bewildering for even experienced investigators to sort out what can be found and where. Although we are sure that the catalog is far from complete, we feel that it is a useful beginning towards an attempt to better understand the hydroclimatological processes in Alaska's coastal zone. We wish to invite contributions and criticisms which could lead to an improved and more comprehensive version at some future date.
    • The Characteristics and Ultimate Disposal of Waste Septic Tank Sludge

      Tilsworth, Timothy (University of Alaska, Institute of Water Resources, 1974-11)
    • Characteristics and utilization of fly ash

      Lu, F.C.; Rao, P.D. (University of Alaska Mineral Industry Research Laboratory, 1971)
      Fly ash produced by four power plants in Fairbanks and vicinity was collected and analyzed. Current fly ash specification and potential users of fly ash in general and in the Fairbanks area in particular were evaluated. A detailed bibliography on utilization of fly ash is appended for reference by producers and potential users of fly ash.
    • Characterization and evaluation of washability of Alaskan coals

      Rao, P.D.; Wolff, E.N. (University of Alaska Mineral Industry Research Laboratory, 1980)
      This report is a result of the second part of a continuing study to obtain washability data for Alaskan coals to supplement the efforts of the U.S. Department of Energy in their ongoing studies on washability of U.S. coals.
    • Characterization and evaluation of washability of Alaskan coals - fifty selected seams from various coal fields

      Rao, P.D. (University of Alaska Mineral Industry Research Laboratory, 1986)
      FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT: September 30,1976 to February 28,1986