• Clearing Alaskan Water Supply Impoundments : Data

      Smith, Daniel W.; Justice, Stanley R. (University of Alaska, Institute of Water Resources, 1976-04)
      The data contained in IWR-67 (Clearing Alaskan Supply Impoundments: Management and Laboratory Study) was collected to determine the effect on water quality of five proposed Alaskan reservoirs as a function of the extent of clearing in site preparation. The study developed a methodology for such analysis and made recommendations as to the best clearing alternatives for each reservoir site. For graphic presentation and evaluation of the data, refer to IWR-67 and IWR-67-A (Literature Review), published by the Institute of Water Resources, University of Alaska, Fairbanks, Alaska.
    • Clearing Alaskan Water Supply Impoundments : Literature Review

      Justice, Stanley R.; Smith, Daniel W. (University of Alaska, Institute of Water Resources, 1976-04)
      This literature review was prepared in conjunction with a research project evaluating the effect on water quality of five proposed Alaskan Reservoirs and recommending clearing alternatives. For the results of the laboratory study and discussion of impoundment management in northern regions refer to "Clearing Alaskan Water Supply Impoundments, Management and Laboratory Study" (IWR-67). The data developed in the laboratory portion of the study is contained in IWR-67-B. Contact the Institute of Water Resources if access to this material is desired. Much of the material in this review was derived from the paper "The Effect of Reservoirs on Water Quality" which was prepared by Stan Justice in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Environmental Quality Engineering.
    • Clearing Alaskan water supply impoundments: management, laboratory study, and literature review

      Smith, Daniel W.; Justice, Stanley R. (University of Alaska, Institute of Water Resources, 1976-04)
      Water supply impoundments in northern regions have seen only limited application. Reasons for the lack of use of such impoundments include the following: 1) little demand for water due to the low population densities and rustic life styles; 2) a lack of conventional distribution systems in many communities; 3) poorly developed technology for construction of dams on permafrost; 4) adequacy of existing river, lake, ice, and lagoon water supplies; 5) shortage of capital to finance the high cost of construction in remote regions.
    • Coal in Alaska requirements to enhance environmentally sound use in both domestic and Pacific Rim markets

      Wilson, W.G.; Irwin, W.; Sims, John; Rao, P.D.; Noll, Bill (University of Alaska Mineral Industry Research Laboratory, 1990)
      This document originates from three meetings held in 1989 with the leaders of the Alaskan Coal Industry and coal technologists from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)~ Mineral Industry Research Laboratory (MIRL) and Geophysical Institute - University of Alaska Fairbanks, the Alaska Department of Natural Resources, the Alaska Science and Technology Commission, several of the Alaska Native Corporations, and a number of coal experts from private industries. The information included is intended to illustrate the vast resource base and quality of Alaskan coals, show the projected size of the Pacific Rim steam coal market, discuss policy changes necessary to facilitate the development of an expanded coal industry, and describe the technology development needs for Alaskan coals to compete in the world market. It is aimed at increasing the general knowledge about the potential of coal in Alaska and providing data for use in marketing the resource.
    • Cold climate water/wastewater transportation and treatment - a bibliography: completion report

      Tilsworth, Timothy; Smith, Daniel M.; Zemansky, G. M.; Justice, Stanley R. (University of Alaska, Institute of Water Resources, 1977-12)
      This bibliography contains 1,400 citations, including published and unpublished papers, on cold-climate water and wastewater transportation and treatment systems. Sources listed include state and federal agency files which contain information on systems in Alaskan communities and the Alyeska Pipeline Service Company camps. References to systems in other northern countries are also included. The objectives of this study were to identify causes of the failure of Alaskan water and wastewater treatment and transportation facilities and to seek methods for design improvements. Originally, the investigators contemplated an evaluation of systems performance in remote areas in relation to the original conception, planning, design, and construction. Because of the tremendous amount of literature examined, the evaluation was undertaken in a subsequent study, "Alaska Wastewater Treatment Technology" (A-058-ALAS) by Dr. Ronald A. Johnson.
    • The combined use of a sand screw, hydrocyclones, and gel-logs to treat placer mine process water

      Chuang, YeKang (University of Alaska Mineral Industry Research Laboratory, 1988)
      This study describes a low-maintenance tailings treatment system for placer mines. A sand screw and two 20 inch hydrocyclones were used to remove gravel, sand and silt from a sluice box discharge. Gel-logs were introduced subsequent to the main settling pond to reduce the suspended solids. Results drawn from a two year study at a placer mine in interior Alaska indicated that: (1) Most of the plus 50 mm particles can be removed from the sluice tailings by the combination of a sand screw and 20 inch hydrocyclones, (2) When using the hydrocyclone overflow, without further cleaning, in recycle operation, the performance of the sand screw and hydrocyclones change due to the build up of fine particles. (3) In laboratory testing cationic type gel-logs proved to be effective in reducing the turbidity of settling pond water from 4,000 NTU to 80 NTU. However, at the mine this test result could not be duplicated even though 14 logs were applied to treat 25% (c 500gpm) of the pond overflow. The cost of installation and operation of the sand screw and hydrocyclone system was about 11% of the total operational cost of the mine in 1986.
    • Community Response Strategies for Environmental Problems of Water Supply and Wastewater Disposal in Fairbanks, Alaska

      Smith, Daniel W.; Pearson, Roger W. (University of Alaska, Institute of Water Resources, 1975-06)
      This report examines the history of the response strategies of the Fairbanks, Alaska, community to problems of water supply and wastewater disposal. Fairbanks is significant since it is the largest settlement in the northern subarctic and arctic regions of North America. Today, the City of Fairbanks and the surrounding urban area have a combined population of over 40,000.
    • Compilation of the data on the land withdrawals in Alaska

      Metz, P.A.; Pearson, R.W.; Lynch, D.F. (University of Alaska Mineral Industry Research Laboratory, 1978)
      Major decisions an the use and disposition of land in Alaska are being made by the State and Federal governments. These decisions will affect the utilization of all our land resources including minerals. Since minerals are an essential component of our existance, the availability and access to minerals is an important issue. There are approximately 2600 land orders and acts classifying land in Alaska that restrict the utilization of our minerals resources. As of April 1977, approximately twenty-six percent of Alaska, or 100,875,391 acres was open to mineral entry and location under the Federal Mining Laws and the State Mining and Mineral leasing Laws.
    • A Computer Model of the Tidal Phenomena in Cook Inlet, Alaska

      Carlson, Robert F.; Behlke, Charles E. (University of Alaska, Institute of Water Resources, 1972-03)
    • A computer processable storage and retrieval program for Alaska mineral information

      Heiner, L.E.; Porter, Eve (University of Alaska Mineral Industry Research Laboratory, 1972)
      The Mineral Industry Research Laboratory has developed a storage and retrieval file for Alaska mineral information to facilitate resource studies. The basis for the computer-processable file is the Division of ecological Survey Mineral Kardex system which contains an entry for every mineral property in Alaska that has either been recorded in the literature or has been claimed under the mineral staking laws. Use of the file has greatly increased the research capability of the laboratory to compile resource-oriented reports such as M.I.R.L. Report No. 16, IIFinal Report - Mineral Resources of Northern Alaska," M.I.R.L. Report No. 18, JlKnown and Potential Ore Reserves, Seward Peninsula, Alaska", and M.J.R.L Report No. 27, "Copper Mineral Occurrences in the Wrangell Mountain - Prince William Sound Area, Alaska" and S.E. Alaska Mineral Commodity Maps. The programs have been given the name MINFILE. MINFILEJ refers to a program that stores mineral information on magnetic tape. MINFILE2 is a Retreival program, MINFILE3 is a program to correct and make additions to the file. MINFILE4 and MINFILE5 are utility programs used for maintenance of the system.
    • Conference on Alaskan placer mining, focus: gold recovery systems

      Beistline, E.H.; Cook, D.J.; Thomas, B.I.; Wolff, E.N. (University of Alaska Mineral Industry Research Laboratory, 1979)
      Alaska Miners' Association and the School of Mineral Industry, University of Alaska, Fairbanks conference proceedings of the Alaskan Placer Mining conference on Gold Recovery Systems.
    • Constraints on the development of coal mining in arctic Alaska based on review of Eurasian arctic practices

      Lynch, D.F.; Johansen, N.I.; Lambert, C., Jr.; Wolff, E.N. (University of Alaska Mineral Industry Research Laboratory, 1976)
      Arctic Alaska's enormous reserves of coal may be a significant future source of energy for the United States and for the Pacific Basin. Large coal reserves have been developed in the Arctic portions of Eurasia, where problems similar to those that might be encountered in Alaska have already been faced. To determine the nature of these problems, the Mineral Industry Research Laboratory of the University of Alaska, under contracts S 0133057 with the U.S. Bureau of Mines, has conducted a literature review on Eurasian coal mining and visited mines in Svalbard, Norway; Carmacks, Y.T.; and Healy, Alaska. The purpose was to establish the most significant physical constraints which may apply to the eventual development of Northwestern Arctic Alaskan coal.
    • Copper mineral occurrences in the Wrangell Mountains-Prince William Sound area, Alaska

      Heiner, L.E.; Wolff, E.N.; Grybeck, D.G. (University of Alaska Mineral Industry Research Laboratory, 1971)
      On January 9, 1970, the U.S. Bureau of Mines entered into an agreement with the University of Alaska based upon a proposal submitted by the Mineral Industry Research Laboratory. Under the terms of this agreement, the Laboratory undertook to compile information on copper occurrences in eight quadrangles covering what are loosely known as the Copper River, White River, and Prince William Sound copper provinces. If time permitted four other quadrangles would be added, and this has been possible. Information was to be obtained by searching published and unpublished records of the Bureau of Mines, the U.S. Geological Survey, the State Division of Geological Survey, the University of Alaska, and the recording offices.
    • Cost of exploration for metallic minerals in Alaska

      Grybeck, D; Peek, B.C.; Robinson, M.S. (University of Alaska Mineral Industry Research Laboratory, 1976)
      The high cost of exploration for metallic minerals in Alaska not only reflects a 20-50% increase in the cost of supplies, food and salaries over those "outside" but also some additional costs that are characteristic of most Alaskan exploration efforts. Transportation in particular often represents half of the exploration budget and is a major cost of almost all programs. Helicopters commonly are used as the basic mode of field transportation; their cost is high (about $125 to $300 per hour) and increasing, and their availability is becoming less certain with the accelerating demand for them. Salaries for field personnel are also considerably higher than those paid to personnel "outside". And the demand, both from within and without the mining industry, for those with Alaskan experience is so great as to drive those salaries even higher. Fuel and communication costs not only show the usual Alaskan mark-up but are also subject to local scarcity and almost unavoidable problems. Fuel will probably continue to be available in the major population centers but there have always been difficulties in providing or obtaining fuel in the bush; these will undoubtedly be magnified with the booming development of Alaska's petroleum resources and national scarcity. Communications with the field will undoubtedly continue to be uncertain at times and will frequently present major problems that money along cannot solve and result in much frustration and delay. Contract services such as drilling, geophysical work, and geochemical analyses are available within the state in varying degree or can be obtained "outside" at rates that do not seem to be unduly expensive. However, the cost of transportation, mobilization, and demobilization of the personnel and equipment used in performing these services may result in unusually high costs for projects of short duration. Early logistical planning has always been considered wise in Alaskan field work and it will undoubtedly continue to be important, if not essential. The lack of it may be alleviated in some cases with copious applications of money but with Alaska's present booming development, the lack of planning may lead to an uncertain ability to work in the field at all. The cost of Alaskan exploration programs vary greatly. Many of the reconnaissance geologic and geochemical programs are strikingly expensive chiefly because of the need for helicopter support. Other types of programs such as prospect evaluations are not nearly so expensive and Alaskan costs for projects of limited area or duration are nor necessarily prohibitive. In almost all cases, experience, imagination, and prior planning can reduce costs significantly.
    • Cost of exploration for metallic minerals in Alaska - 1982

      Metz, P.A.; Campbell, B.W. (University of Alaska Mineral Industry Research Laboratory, 1982)
      This report prepared by the professional staff of the Mineral Industry Research Laboratory (M.I.R.L.), is a contemporary and detailed source of information relating to the costs of conducting mineral exploration for metallics in Alaska with commentary on the availability of essential services. As such it will serve the needs of established mining companies engaged in exploration ventures as well as newcomers to the Alaskan scene.
    • Current state-of-the-art in drying low-rank coals

      Rao, P.D. and Wolff, E.N. (University of Alaska Mineral Industry Research Laboratory, 1976)
      Research on drying of low-rank coals, such as lignites and subbituminous coals, has been conducted for nearly half a century. Although partial drying of Dakota lignite is practiced for freeze-proofing by mixing partially dried coal with run-of-mine coal, full scale drying of low rank coals has never been practiced commercially in this country. The reasons are: ( 1 ) drying of low rank coals by conventional methods results in severe degradation of coal particles; (2) dried coals are thus dusty and difficult to handle; (3) reabsorption of moisture in storage and transit defeats the drying process. In addition the dry coal particles will react with ambient oxygen, and heat up enough to ignite. It appears that large-scale development of Alaskan coals may have to await solutions to these problems. Our Mineral Industry Research Laboratory at the University of Alaska is making a comprehensive literature search seeking solutions to these problems and identifying areas of research that should be undertaken.
    • Deadfall Syncline coal, quality and reserves

      Callahan, J.E.; Rao, P.D.; Walsh, D.E. (University of Alaska Mineral Industry Research Laboratory, 1992)
      PRESENT INVESTIGATION The purpose of the 1991 drilling program was twofold: 1. To evaluate the coal reserves in a previously identified thick coal in an area of low structural dips and dip-slope topography near the axial plunge of the west extension of the Deadfall Syncline, primarily for surface mining, and to determine the feasibility of mining additional beds in conjunction with the thick coal. (For the purposes of this investigation, this coal is designated K3 as explained below), 2. To examine a continuous and unbroken stratigraphic interval of the Corwin formation in the northeastern part of the Deadfall Syncline as an initial step toward evaluation of the whole basin. This was accomplished by drilling overlapping holes aligned generally parallel to the dip direction, and spaced in accordance with the magnitude of dip and depth capacity of the drill. About 720 feet of stratigraphic section were covered in this way. A total of fourteen exploratory holes were drilled, ranging from 116 to 426 feet in depth (Figure 2). The drill was a Mobil B-60 mounted on a Nodwell tracked vehicle. Circulation was provided by a large compressor mounted on another Nodwell. Most of the footage was drilled with an air hammer, which provided a significant improvement in drilling rates over conventional rotary drilling. Lithology of cuttings from all holes was logged continuously, and composite grab samples from each 5 or 10 foot interval were taken. Coal cuttings were collected on a (relatively) clean plastic sheet, and promptly double bagged in plastic to minimize loss of bed moisture. Cores were taken from the K3 coal at 3 drill hole locations, and the underlying K4 coal was also cored at one of these 3 holes. A comparison of core length to geophysical logs indicates essentially 100% recovery for all cores. All samples, including rock cuttings, were shipped to the Mineral Industry Research Laboratory (MIRL), University of Alaska Fairbanks, for analyses and/or storage. All holes were logged with a Gearhart-Owen GeoLogger using natural garmna and gammagamma density tools. The log response with these tools for coals is distinct and unambiguous, particularly that of the density log, and the resolution is sufficient to estimate bed thickness to within 3 to 4 inches (Figures 8 and 9).
    • Determination mercury in Alaskan coals by flameless atomic absorption

      Rao, P.D. (University of Alaska Mineral Industry Research Laboratory, 1973)
      An oxygen combustion, double gold amalgamation system is constructed for the determination of mercury in Alaskan coals. Solutions have been found for certain problems in design and operation. The effect of operating variables have been thoroughly evaluated and analytical procedure is outlined. The system involves combustion of goal in an oxygen atmosphere and amalgamating mercury on gold coils. The amalgamated mercury is released by heating and measured in an atomic absorption cell.
    • Determination of molybdenum in geological materials

      Rao, P.D. (University of Alaska Mineral Industry Research Laboratory, 1971-09)
      This paper will describe a method for the determination of molybdenum in geological materials. It is known that molybdenum as molybdate or phosphomolybdate ion can be extracted using the liquid ion exchanger, Aliquat 336 (methyl tricapryl ammonium chloride, available from General Mills, Inc. Kankakee, Ill.). Aliquat 336 has been used for analytical separation of gold, tungsten, and actinide-lanthanide elements.
    • The determination of titanium in titaniferous magnetite ores by atomic absorption spectrophotometry

      Rao, P.D. (University of Alaska Mineral Industry Research Laboratory, 1972-03)
      Amos and Willis (1) first investigated the use of nitrous oxide for the determination of titanium. They found that the presence of HF and iron enhance the absorption of titanium. They recommended “much more extensive investigation before a practicing chemical analyst can determine this element in a routine fashion by atomic absorption.” Various authors (2, 3, 4, 5, 6) have investigated titanium by atomic absorption and have recommended a number of different procedures to remove interference. In attempting to analyze lithium metaborate fusions (7, 8) of titaniferous magnetite ores of Alaska by atomic absorption, it was found that the interferences are not completely removed by any single approach suggested in the literature. Silicon, iron and aluminum could vary widely between samples and an approach was needed that would completely eliminate interference effects of all these elements, without having to match the gross matrix composition of samples and standards.