• Annual report of research progress

      MIRL (1964)
      Research that will lead to the utilization of Alaska's mineral resources and hence create new wealth must be 1::ontinued at an increased rate in the future if a strong mineral industry is to be developed and maintained. Current investment in minerals research is a judicious practice that will pay dividends to the State in the future. The Engineering Council for Professional Development, in their 1964 report which continued the accreditation of the engineering curri1:: ula at the University of Alaska, emphasized this concept when they stated: ''Regardless of the mining industry's present size, the State clearly needs a mining center in its State University not only for teachi} 1g but also for research and for service to prDspectors and mine operators." The Mineral Industry Research Laboratory is dedicated to those objectives of research, instruction and service which will help build the mineral economy of Alaska. Staff of the Mineral Industry Research Laboratory University of Alaska
    • Annual report of research progress

      MIRL (University of Alaska Mineral Industry Research Laboratory, 1965)
      Continuous research is the key to problem solutions and also to new developments in winning minerals from any environment, be it the land, the air, or the sea. Strong research programs yield both present and future benefits and are part of any vigorous, dynamic development. In Alaska, new mineral deposits must be searched for; marginal and submarginal deposits must be reviewed in terms of sophisticated methods of mining, benefication and extraction; and greater utilization must be developed for Alaska's industrial minerals, fuels, and off-shore mineral deposits. Continuous research, directed toward solving problems of present mineral production and uses, yields a technology which will solve future problems, and is essential if a vigorous mineral industry is to continue to play its basic role in Alaska's growing economy. Since mineral resources are of limited value without human resources, the Mineral Industry Research Laboratory is also dedicated to the development of Alaska's young men and women for careers in the mineral industry. The Staff MIRL
    • Petrographic evaluation of coking potential of selected coals and blends

      Harkinson, F.C. (University of Alaska Mineral Industry Research Laboratory, 1965)
      The United States Bureau of Mines, Geological Survey, and other agencies have made extensive investigations on Alaskan coals. Coke tests on Alaskan coals as early as 1908 have indicatedd, that a few coals are of coking quality. However, lack of known coking coal reserves large enough for economic exploitation precludes competitive marketing. These coals which do indicate coking quality often occur in isolated areas and in complex geologic structure, thus prohibiting development. This study by no means defines the economic feasibility of mining, processing, or marketing of potential coking coals, but rather is concerned with new innovations of coal science to determine the possibility of blending coking cads with non-coking coals. Results i n d a t e that coherent coke products may be made by this blending and further illustrates a possible increase in reserves of coking coal.
    • The market potential for Alaskan clay products

      Beasley, C.A. (University of Alaska Mineral Industry Research Laboratory (MIRL), 1965)
      This study was originally proposed to the Alaska Department of Economic Development and Planning as part of a continuing effort by the Mineral Industry Research Lab of the University of Alaska to strengthen and diversity the mineral industry of the state.
    • The market for insulation in Alaska and feasibility of the regional manufacture of insulating materials

      Haring, R.C.; Beasley, C.A. (University of Alaska Mineral Industry Research Laboratory, 1965)
      This investigation was undertaken jointly by the Mineral Industry Research Laboratory and the Institute of Business, Economic and Government Research at the University of Alaska. It is one of a continuing series of studies concerning the market and utilization rate for selected structural materials within Alaska. The overall objective of these studies is to identify opportunities for the regional manufacture of selected building products. In this manner, this limited study of insulation markets complements more extensive previous studies concerning Alaskan cement and clay products, markets and manufacturing feasibility.
    • Fortran IV trent-surface program for the IBM 360 model 40 computer

      Heiner, Lawrence; Geller, Stephen P. (University of Alaska Mineral Industry Research Laboratory, 1966)
      A Fortran IV trend surface program with polynomial contouring and residual plotting has been adapted to the University of Alaska IBM 360 Model 40 Computer. The program will compute equations of polynomials of the first through sixth degree, measures of the goodness of fit of the surfaces, tabulate original data, x y coordinates and corresponding residuals for each surface; contour each polynomial, and plot original values and residuals for each surface computed.
    • Investigations of lightweight aggregates in Alaska

      Heiner, L.E.; Loskamp, A.N. (University of Alaska Mineral Industry Research Laboratory, 1966)
      Increased construction costs coupled with the current large demand for aggregate materials prompted an investigation by the Mineral Industry Research Laboratory to find deposits of shale suitable for the manufacture of lightweight aggregate near the cities of Anchorage and Fairbanks.
    • Annual report of research progress

      MIRL (University of Alaska Mineral Industry Research Laboratory, 1966)
      The mineral and human resources of a state and/or nation are to a large extent the basis of a strong and flourishing economy. In Alaska this is currently illustrated by the activities of the oil and gas industry and the resulting large sums of money that have gone into the state Treasury to help give a sound financial basis to Alaska. The Mineral Industry Research Laboratory has concentrated its efforts on research that will help in the more complete utilization of Alaska's mineral resources for work in the state's mineral industry. This report describes in moderate detail the projects that have been undertaken. These are in the areas of mineral economics, exploration, mining, mineral benefication, beach and ocean mining, utilization of nonmetallics, use of coal resources, and the solving of numerous' specific problems posed by mining people of the state. Training of young men and women for the mineral industry is stimulated by their having the opportunity to work on projects as a part of their graduate program under the supervision of the staff of MIRL. Theses completed offer a considerable amount of information to the public. Recent completed theses are listed in this report. The laboratory has been supported financially by the state of Alaska and various grants and work in kind from individuals and agencies. Private industry has helped in purchasing equipment and cooperative projects are underway with government agencies. Personnel and facilities of the College of Earth Sciences and Mineral Industry supplemented by other professional personnel are involved in teaching and research as set forth in enabling legislation for the Laboratory. The Staff MIRL
    • Geochemical-geophysical investigations, Fairbanks district

      Heiner, L.E.; Beistline, E.H.; Moody, D.W.; Thomas, B.I.; Wallis, J.E.; Loperfido, J.C.; Peterson, R.J.; Wolff, E.N. (University of Alaska Mineral Industry Research Laboratory, 1967)
      Trace element distribution in a subarctic valley in the Cleary Hill area of the Fairbanks gold district has been studied. Zinc and arsenic have been found excellent pathfinder elements for auriferous deposits. Methods of analysis for copper, lead, zinc, molybdenum, silver and arsenic as well as heavy metals are discussed. The University of Alaska method #2 has been improved, Terrain, slope, and frozen ground have little effect upon the distribution of trace elements associated with the Cleary H i l l vein. A new method for the determination of zinc using dilute acid is proposed. Analysis of geochemical data by trend surface procedures proved effective for localization of anomalies.
    • Trace element copper distribution and areal geology in a portion of the Clearwater Mountains, Alaska

      Glavinovich, P.S. (University of Alaska Mineral Industry Research Laboratory, 1967)
      The study concerns that portion of the Clearwater Mountains defined by north latitudes 63' 03' and 63' 08' and west longitudes 147' 09' and 147' 30'. Outcrop within the area consists predominantly of a sequence of intercalated andesitic and basaltic flows. Sedimentary rocks are present but comprise a very small percentage of the total section. Dikes and a small pluton are also present. The prevailing attitude of the volcanic and sedimentary rocks is east-northeast with a consistent north dip. A Triassic age is accepted for the volcanic and sedimentary rocks. Areal and local sampling indicates that all rock types are abnormally high in trace copper content, and average background is 1000 ppm. Copper distribution suggests a syngenetic origin. Frequent small copper deposits crop out along the north side of the area. The deposits are epigcnctic and are structurally controlled. The origin of these deposits may have potential exploration significance.
    • Natural resource base of the Fairbanks North Star Borough

      Wolff, E.N.; Haring, R.C. (University of Alaska Mineral Industry Research Laboratory, 1967)
      This report on the natural resource base of the Fairbanks North Star Borough is one of several continuing research projects related to community planning in Alaska. It represents an interdisciplinary effort of the Mineral Industry Research Laboratory and the Institute of Social, Economic and Government Research at the University of Alaska. The result is a synthesis of the economic development potential of natural resources in the greater Fairbanks region.
    • Annual report of research progress

      MIRL (1967)
      This year the Mineral Industry Research Laboratory has concentrated its efforts on projects relating to the more complete utilization of Alaska's mineral resources. This report briefly describes the projects that have been undertaken. These are broad in scope including topics such as mineral economics, exploration, mining, mineral beneficiation, beach and ocean mining, use of coal resources, resource evaluation, and market research analysis. Studies have been undertaken which investigate problems or topics in nearly all areas of the state, including Southeastern Alaska, Anchorage area, Northern Alaska and the Fairbanks area. In the future the MIRL Annual Report will be presented on a fiscal basis. To bridge the gap this year, an addendum to this report will be prepared in the Spring. Staff of the MIRL University of Alaska
    • Applications of trend surface analysis and geologic model building to mineralized districts in Alaska

      Heiner, L.E.; Wolff, E.N. (University of Alaska Mineral Industry Research Laboratory, 1967)
      The Mineral Industry Research Laboratory, University of Alaska, has investigated the application of computers and statistics to mineral deposits in Alaska. Existing programs have been adapted and new ones written for the computers available at the University. The methods tested are trend surface analysis and geologic model making. An existing coeffecient of association program was converted to Fortran IV , but was not applied to an Alaskan problem. A trend surface is a mathematically describable surface that most closely approximates a surface representing observed data. In geologic model making, regression analysis is used to determine what geologic features are significant as ore controls. Coefficient of association compares samples to each other on the basis of a variable being present or absent. Trend surfaces were computed for dips and s t r i k e s of geologic features ( v e i n s , f a u l t s , bedrock) for Southeastern Alaska, the Chichagof district , and the Hyder district . Results for the f i r s t two are presented as maps. Trend surfaces and residual maps were prepared for geochemical data from the Slana district, Alaska. A mineral occurrence model was made for a portion of the Craig Quadrangle, and potential values were computed for c e l l s in the area. Appraisals of potential values by five geologists are compared with those of the model. An IBM 1620 multiple regression program is included.
    • Preliminary report mineral resources of northern Alaska

      Wolff, E.N.; Heiner, L.E.; Lu, F.C. (1967)
      This report is a preliminary report by the Mineral Industry Research Laboratory to the NORTH committee on the subject of mineral resources in the region to be traversed by a proposed railroad.
    • Development of a light-weight low cost self potential unit

      Zonge, K.L. (University of Alaska Mineral Industry Research Laboratory, 1968)
      A lightweight, low cost self-potential unit has been developed using solid state components. The parts for the basic unit including batteries, copper sulfate pots, and hookup wire costs approximately $70.00. The device is instant reading and weighs two pounds. The batteries used have a shelf life of ten years and an estimated operation life (based on continuous use for ten hours per day) of sixty days. This instrument was developed specifically for the Alaskan prospector who is concerned with weight and cost of field instrumentation.
    • Final report - mineral resources of northern Alaska

      Heiner, L.E.; Wolff, E.N. (University of Alaska Mineral Industry Research Laboratory, 1968)
      PURPOSE. This is the final report on the work authorized on July 29, 1967, by the NORTH Commission. The purpose is to inventory mineral resources in northern Alaska and to delineate favorable mineral areas, insofar as possible. Later, a mineral policy study was added and a survey of available airborne geophysics. The Alaska Railroad made possible the large scale dredging at Fairbanks and became a feeder to all interior districts. It allowed the building of military bases during and after World War II. Freight moves predominantly north.
    • Known and potential ore reserves, Seward Peninsula, Alaska

      Lu, F.C.; Heiner, L.E.; Harris, D.P. (University of Alaska Mineral Industry Research Laboratory, 1968)
      The study utilizes all available information pertaining to the resources of the Seward Peninsula in an attempt to present factual data as well as to predict by statistical means the resources yet to be found.
    • Distribution of certain minor elements in Alaskan coals

      Rao, P.D. (University of Alaska Mineral Industry Research Laboratory, 1968)
      Seventy-five samples of coal from Northern Alaska, Jarvis Creek, Nenana, Matanuska, Kenai and Bering River Coal Fields were analyzed by quantitative spectrochemical procedures f o r lead, gallium, copper, barium, beryllium, nickel, titanium, vanadium, zirconium, cobalt, chromium, germanium, and tin. Other elements, of significance, identified from the spectrograms were, gold and silver identified in certain Nenana coals and silver in coals from Chickaloon in the Matanuska field, in concentrations up to several parts per million of coal ash. Forty-one of the above samples were sink-floated to study the distribution of minor elements between the organic and inorganic phases of the coals. Relative affinities of the minor of the minor elements to the organic matter in the coal is discussed.
    • Handbook of geophysical prospecting methods for the Alaskan prospector

      Heiner, L.E. (University of Alaska Mineral Industry Research Laboratory, 1969)
      This Handbook has been compiled to acquaint the Alaskan prospector with the more recent application of geophysics for locating economic metallic minerals. For this reason, well documented subjects such as the use of the dip needle and mineral detectors have been excluded.
    • Heavy minerals in Alaskan beach sand deposits

      Cook, D.J. (University of Alaska Mineral Industry Research Laboratory, 1969)
      Beach sand deposits along Alaska's shoreline have been prospected and worked for their precious metal content since the time of Russian occupation. Areas such as the Nome Beaches of the Seward Peninsula have been very productive, and in recent years exploration has proceded to include off shore extensions of these deposits. Evaluation of associated heavy mineral contents of these deposits, however, have been cursory and in most cases neglected entirely. In view of the thousands of miles of Alaskan coastline with known mineral provinces on adjacent land; much information is needed concerning the origin of mineral constituents, evaluation of past and present beach deposits and possibilities of off shore extensions of tho continental shelf. This report is concerned with samples of beach sand material submitted to the Mineral Industry Research Laboratory by individuals. These samples, taken from various locations, cannot be viewed as programs designed to delineate reserves from the respective areas. They should be considered as reconnaissance samples to indicate the mineral constituents present and the need for more comprehensive evaluation. Systematic and complete evaluation of all mineral constituents, including precious materials, is a major undertaking because of the erratic nature of the deposits. Special studies are required concerning sampling techniques, mining methods, recovery systems and marketing procedures. It is, therefore, beyond the financial capabilities of most individuals and requires the involvement of government agencies or corporations to obtain the necessary data to determine economic feasibility .