• Applications of trend surface analysis and geologic model building to mineralized districts in Alaska

      Heiner, L.E.; Wolff, E.N. (University of Alaska Mineral Industry Research Laboratory, 1967)
      The Mineral Industry Research Laboratory, University of Alaska, has investigated the application of computers and statistics to mineral deposits in Alaska. Existing programs have been adapted and new ones written for the computers available at the University. The methods tested are trend surface analysis and geologic model making. An existing coeffecient of association program was converted to Fortran IV , but was not applied to an Alaskan problem. A trend surface is a mathematically describable surface that most closely approximates a surface representing observed data. In geologic model making, regression analysis is used to determine what geologic features are significant as ore controls. Coefficient of association compares samples to each other on the basis of a variable being present or absent. Trend surfaces were computed for dips and s t r i k e s of geologic features ( v e i n s , f a u l t s , bedrock) for Southeastern Alaska, the Chichagof district , and the Hyder district . Results for the f i r s t two are presented as maps. Trend surfaces and residual maps were prepared for geochemical data from the Slana district, Alaska. A mineral occurrence model was made for a portion of the Craig Quadrangle, and potential values were computed for c e l l s in the area. Appraisals of potential values by five geologists are compared with those of the model. An IBM 1620 multiple regression program is included.
    • Factors affecting costs of mining in Alaska

      Lambert, C.; Taylor, D. (University of Alaska Mineral Industry Research Laboratory, 1982)
      The basic factors which affect the cost of mining in Alaska are discussed herein. Contrary to popular opinion, cold weather is not the major factor. This problem has, for the most part, been solved through experience in Eastern Canada and later efforts in British Columbia and the Yukon. Remoteness and isolation and its effect upon personnel, inventory and services of all kinds are among the more difficult with which to anticipate and cope. Considerable creativity is required to solve these problems, which differ somewhat with the type and location of mineral deposit, and will quite likely require solutions at variance with the current attitudes and practices of the company involved. In Alaska, electric power, transportation and land tenure pose difficulties of a type not experienced when existing mines in Canada were developed.
    • The market potential for Alaskan clay products

      Beasley, C.A. (University of Alaska Mineral Industry Research Laboratory (MIRL), 1965)
      This study was originally proposed to the Alaska Department of Economic Development and Planning as part of a continuing effort by the Mineral Industry Research Lab of the University of Alaska to strengthen and diversity the mineral industry of the state.
    • Trace element copper distribution and areal geology in a portion of the Clearwater Mountains, Alaska

      Glavinovich, P.S. (University of Alaska Mineral Industry Research Laboratory, 1967)
      The study concerns that portion of the Clearwater Mountains defined by north latitudes 63' 03' and 63' 08' and west longitudes 147' 09' and 147' 30'. Outcrop within the area consists predominantly of a sequence of intercalated andesitic and basaltic flows. Sedimentary rocks are present but comprise a very small percentage of the total section. Dikes and a small pluton are also present. The prevailing attitude of the volcanic and sedimentary rocks is east-northeast with a consistent north dip. A Triassic age is accepted for the volcanic and sedimentary rocks. Areal and local sampling indicates that all rock types are abnormally high in trace copper content, and average background is 1000 ppm. Copper distribution suggests a syngenetic origin. Frequent small copper deposits crop out along the north side of the area. The deposits are epigcnctic and are structurally controlled. The origin of these deposits may have potential exploration significance.