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dc.contributor.authorParkinson, Linsey Viann
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-04T00:47:13Z
dc.date.available2019-07-04T00:47:13Z
dc.date.issued2019-05
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11122/10525
dc.descriptionThesis (M.S.) University of Alaska Fairbanks, 2019en_US
dc.description.abstractThere are over 50 species of plants in Alaska that produce fleshy fruits (hereafter: "berries"), of which people consume 25. Berries are a key cultural and nutritional resource in rural Alaska and an important source of calories for a range of animals including bears (Ursus spp.), foxes (Vulpes vulpes), geese (e.g., Branta hutchinsii), and voles (e.g., Myodes rutilus). Berry production, from bud development to ripe fruit, takes at least 15 months and may be affected by factors even a year or two before that. Many studies in the circumpolar North focus on these interannual effects on fruit production but few assess how local variation within a forested region may affect berry numbers. Changes in the frequency and severity of wildfires in the boreal forest has affected soil conditions and plant community structure, which may alter the range of circumstances a species must respond to, influencing overall fruit production at a site. I studied how fruit production in Vaccinium uliginosum (blueberry) and V. vitis-idaea (lingonberry), responded to factors such as pollen load, floral resources, canopy cover, and soil conditions within forest sites of Interior Alaska. I found two distinct habitat types in the Interior Alaskan forest, upland and lowland, which differed by elevation, soil moisture (lower in upland sites), and active layer (deeper in upland sites). We found lingonberry was more pollen limited than blueberry, and plants in lowland sites were more pollen limited while plants in upland sites were more resource limited. Additionally, canopy cover had a significant negative effect on a ramet's investment in flowers, berries, and leaves, versus structural growth, in upland sites but little effect in lowland sites. I was able to explain more of the variation in berry production and resource allocation in upland sites than lowland sites. Pollen and resource limitation differed between the two species and between uplands and lowlands suggesting Vaccinium berry production and resource allocation is partially defined by spatial variability of the landscape.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipBonanza Creek Long Term Ecological Research program, National Science Foundation (DEB-1636476) and the USDA Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station (RJVA-PNW-01-JV-11261952-231)en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectbog blueberryen_US
dc.subjectAlaskaen_US
dc.subjectInterior Alaskaen_US
dc.subjectfloweringen_US
dc.subjectpollenen_US
dc.subjectgrowthen_US
dc.subjectyieldsen_US
dc.subjecthabitaten_US
dc.subjectvaccinium vitis-idaeaen_US
dc.titleSpatial variation in blueberry (Vaccinium uliginosum) and lingonberry (Vaccinium vitis-idaea) fruit production in Interior Alaskaen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.type.degreemsen_US
dc.identifier.departmentDepartment of Biology and Wildlifeen_US
dc.contributor.chairMulder, Christa
dc.contributor.committeeHollingsworth, Teresa
dc.contributor.committeeSpellman, Katie
refterms.dateFOA2019-11-07T00:00:00Z


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