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dc.contributor.authorRaymond-Yakoubian, Julie M.
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-06T20:22:35Z
dc.date.available2019-07-06T20:22:35Z
dc.date.issued2019-05
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11122/10531
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.) University of Alaska Fairbanks, 2019en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation is the result of sociocultural anthropological research in and about the community of Elim, Alaska. Elim is a small community of approximately 330 (primarily Inupiaq and Yup'ik Eskimo) people in Norton Sound. This research began with a focus on the topics of salmon and identity in the community. The focus on salmon was particularly important because the communities of this region have often traditionally been understood in the social sciences through the lens of relationships with marine mammals. The research involved participant observation in the community, a variety of forms of ethnographic interviewing (free listing, structured, and semi-structured interviews), focus groups, storytelling sessions, and archival research. Over 80 adults in the community participated in the project through interviews. I also completed extensive photo-documentation of the community and various aspects of peoples' relationships with subsistence activities. Much of this work began with inquiries about the importance of salmon to people in Elim, as well as an examination of other things which were important to Elim residents, and how people come to understand themselves. In this I also examined and learned about aspects of Elim residents' relationships with fish and other animals, with the environment, with the spiritual world, and with each other. This process led me to insights not just about identity in Elim - what matters, what is meaningful and valued, how people understand and define themselves and their community, and so on - but it also led to me an understanding of how Elim residents think about the nature of the world in general (i.e., cosmology). My main argument in this dissertation is that my research in and about Elim revealed that identity and cosmology are co-created - and it revealed how this is the case. I discovered that salmon are 'good to think with' in order to see that. This co-creation of identity and cosmology occurs within a particularly visible hybrid cosmological landscape of (primarily) 'traditionally Indigenous' and Christian ideologies. This landscape in lived culture and context is marked by a patterned heteroglossic 'condition' which includes a dominant (and indigenized) Christian discourse. This heteroglossia is constituted, represented, and evidenced by a (markedly) heterogeneous multiplicity of discourse, practice, and belief. This cosmological landscape and its heteroglossic condition are visible, and made, in various respects in co-implicated, co-indexical, interlocking instantiations of human-animal relationships, spirituality, systems of proper behavior, place attachments, and identity processes and formations.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNorth Pacific Research Board Graduate Fellowship, Alaska EPSCoR Graduate Fellowship (NSF award #OIA-1208927), Alaska Salmon Fellows fellowship (from the Alaska Humanities Forum), Kawerak Incorporated, Norton Sound Economic Development Corporationen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectsubsistence fishingen_US
dc.subjectAlaskaen_US
dc.subjectElimen_US
dc.subjectpacific salmonen_US
dc.subjectsymbolismen_US
dc.subjectsubsistence economyen_US
dc.titleSalmon, cosmology, and identity in Elim, Alaskaen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.type.degreephden_US
dc.identifier.departmentDepartment of Anthropologyen_US
dc.contributor.chairSchweitzer, Peter
dc.contributor.chairKoester, David
dc.contributor.committeePlattet, Patrick
dc.contributor.committeeCarothers, Courtney
dc.contributor.committeeLowe, Marie
refterms.dateFOA2020-03-06T03:00:42Z


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