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dc.contributor.authorConn, Stephen
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-19T20:46:32Z
dc.date.available2019-12-19T20:46:32Z
dc.date.issued1990-04
dc.identifier.citationConn, Stephen. (1990). "Why Canadian Indian Law Is Important to Alaskans, Why Indian Law in Alaska Is Important to Canada." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 32nd annual conference of the Western Regional Science Association, Portland, OR, Apr 1990.en_US
dc.identifier.otherJC 9007.02
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11122/10741
dc.descriptionThis paper revises and expands upon a previous paper: Conn, Stephen. (1989). "From Land Rights to Sovereignty: Curious Parallels between Alaskan and Canadian Indigenous Peoples". Paper presented at the biennial meeting of the Association for Canadian Studies in the U.S., San Francisco, Nov 1989. (https://scholarworks.alaska.edu/handle/11122/10740)en_US
dc.description.abstractFederal policy governing indigenous peoples in Canada has been marked by repeated glances south and west (at Alaska) as it has been formed through parliamentary edict, case law and Constitutional entrenchment. Although rooted in a common Crown policy, the discrete history of Canadian policy has diverged from American practice even as the country's historical and its political development have diverged. Unlike United States policy, the underpinnings of Canadian Indian law as it related to aboriginal title land rights and the limits and potential of tribal sovereignty are only now coming into focus. This belated articulation of Indian rights parallels similar developments in Alaska where land rights and tribal rights are only now being defined. In both Alaska and Canada, hunting and fishing rights and tribal governance are political and legal matters whose impact on resource development and control by provinces and states make neat application of older Indian law concepts less predictable. Cases in either place offer guidance to federal courts in either country within a modern debate over public land rights. The author suggests that attorneys in each place monitor case law and legislation only now emerging.en_US
dc.description.tableofcontentsAbstract / [Introduction] / States and Provinces / What Alaskans Discovered / The Territorial and Developmental Imperative / Tribal Models Compared / Subsistence / Government Services / Footnotes / Bibliographyen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherJustice Center, University of Alaska Anchorageen_US
dc.subjectAlaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act (ANILCA)en_US
dc.subjectAlaska Native Claims Settlement Act (ANCSA)en_US
dc.subjectAlaska Nativesen_US
dc.subjectbush justiceen_US
dc.subjectCanadaen_US
dc.subjectCanadian First Nationsen_US
dc.subjectIndian lawen_US
dc.subjectrural justiceen_US
dc.subjectsovereigntyen_US
dc.subjectsubsistenceen_US
dc.titleWhy Canadian Indian Law Is Important to Alaskans, Why Indian Law in Alaska Is Important to Canadaen_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
refterms.dateFOA2020-03-07T01:26:34Z


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