• Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 16, No. 1 (Spring 1999)

      Atwell, Cassie; Trostle, Lawrence C.; Bureau of Justice Statistics (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1999-03-01)
      The Spring 1999 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum presents findings from a study of the effectiveness of the Brady Act in Alaska, focusing on procedures used by Alaska law enforcement agencies to determine eligibility of applicants for handgun purchases and looking at handgun purchase applications denied by the Anchorage Police Department; a related article presents views on problems with the Brady Act's implementation. The Bureau of Justice Statistics reports on capital punishment in the U.S. in 1997, and the use of the death penalty in by other nations is examined.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 16, No. 2 (Summer 1999)

      Riley, John; UAA Justice Center (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1999-06-01)
      The Summer 1999 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum opens with an article presenting figures on the use of firearms in the commission of violent crimes in Alaska and in the U.S. as a whole from 1980 to 1997. A recent book on the growth of mass incarceration is reviewed. Major findings from an Alaska Judicial Council report on a 15-month pilot probation program for misdemeanor domestic violence offenders in Palmer are summarized.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 16, No. 3 (Fall 1999)

      Moras, Antonia; UAA Justice Center (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1999-09-01)
      The Fall 1999 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum presents findings from a study of the nearly 2000 adults arrested by Anchorage police for drunk driving in 1996 and examines the adjudication process and case outcomes. A second article provides an overview of the structure and operation of the federal immigration court in Anchorage.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 16, No. 4 (Winter 2000)

      Riley, John; UAA Justice Center (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2000-01-01)
      Alaska Natives constitute approximately 17 per cent of the Alaska’s population, but are under-represented in justice system employment and over-represented among those who are arrested, convicted, and incarcerated and among those victimized by violent crime. The Winter 2000 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum presents preliminary results of a study of perceptions of correctional work among Alaska Natives which may influence the recruitment of Alaska Natives to careers in corrections. Statistics on Alaska Native and American Indian employment in the Alaska justice system are also provided. National data from the Bureau of Justice Statistics on criminal victimization of Alaska Natives and American Indians are presented, showing that the rate of violent victimization among Alaska Natives and American Indians is more than twice as high as the national average.