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dc.contributor.authorKienholtz, C.
dc.contributor.authorSutherland, D. A.
dc.contributor.authorJackson, R. H.
dc.contributor.authorNash, J. D.
dc.contributor.authorAmundson, J. M.
dc.contributor.authorMotyka, R. J.
dc.contributor.authorWinters, D.
dc.contributor.authorSkyllingstad, E.
dc.contributor.authorPettit, E. C.
dc.date.accessioned2020-03-26T17:49:29Z
dc.date.available2020-03-26T17:49:29Z
dc.date.issued2019-11-25
dc.identifier.citationJackson, R. H., Nash, J. D., Kienholz, C., Sutherland, D. A., Amundson, J. M., Motyka, R. J., et al. (2020). Meltwater intrusions reveal mechanisms for rapid submarine melt at a tidewater glacier. Geophysical Research Letters, 47, e2019GL085335. https://doi.org/10.1029/2019GL085335en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11122/10935
dc.description.abstractSubmarine melting has been implicated as a driver of glacier retreat and sea level rise, but to date melting has been difficult to observe and quantify. As a result, melt rates have been estimated from parameterizations that are largely unconstrained by observations, particularly at the near-vertical termini of tidewater glaciers. With standard coefficients, these melt parameterizations predict that ambient melting (the melt away from subglacial discharge outlets) is negligible compared to discharge-driven melting for typical tidewater glaciers. Here, we present new data from LeConte Glacier, Alaska, that challenges this paradigm. Using autonomous kayaks, we observe ambient meltwater intrusions that are ubiquitous within 400 m of the terminus, and we provide the first characterization of their properties, structure, and distribution. Our results suggest that ambient melt rates are substantially higher (×100) than standard theory predicts and that ambient melting is a significant part of the total submarine melt flux. We explore modifications to the prevalent melt parameterization to provide a path forward for improved modeling of ocean-glacier interactions.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was funded by NSF OPP Grants 1503910, 1504191, 1504288, and 1504521 and National Geographic Grant CP4-171R-17. Additionally, this research was supported by the NOAA Climate and Global Change Postdoctoral Fellowship Program, administered by UCAR’s Cooperative Programs for the Advancement of Earth System Science (CPAESS) under award #NA18NWS4620043B. These observations would not be possible without the skilled engineering team who developed the autonomous kayaks—including Jasmine Nahorniak, June Marion, Nick McComb, Anthony Grana, and Corwin Perren—and also the Captain and crew of the M/V Amber Anne. We thank Donald Slater and an anonymous reviewer for valuable feedback that improved this manuscript. Data availability: All of the oceanographic data collected by ship and kayak have been archived with the National Centers for Environmental Information (Accession 0189574, https://accession.nodc.noaa.gov/ 0189574). The glacier data have been archived at the Arctic Data Center (https://doi.org/10.18739/A22G44).en_US
dc.publisherAmerican Geophysical Unionen_US
dc.sourceResearch Letteren_US
dc.subjectmeltwater intrusionsen_US
dc.subjectsubmarine meltingen_US
dc.subjectsea level riseen_US
dc.subjectparameterizationsen_US
dc.subjecttidewater glaciersen_US
dc.subjectterminien_US
dc.subjectsubglacial dischargeen_US
dc.subjectocean-glacier interactionsen_US
dc.subjectglaciersen_US
dc.titleMeltwater Intrusions Reveal Mechanisms for Rapid Submarine Melt at a Tidewater Glacieren_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.peerreviewYesen_US
refterms.dateFOA2020-03-26T17:49:30Z
dc.identifier.journalGeophysical Research Lettersen_US


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