Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorBurton, J. C.
dc.contributor.authorAmundson, Jason M.
dc.contributor.authorAbbot, D. S.
dc.contributor.authorBoghosian, A.
dc.contributor.authorCathles, L. M.
dc.contributor.authorCorrea-Legisos, S.
dc.contributor.authorDarnell, N.
dc.contributor.authorGuttenberg, N.
dc.contributor.authorHolland, D. M.
dc.contributor.authorMacAyeal, D. R
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-28T19:31:41Z
dc.date.available2020-04-28T19:31:41Z
dc.date.issued2012-01-20
dc.identifier.citationBurton, J. C., J. M. Amundson, D. S. Abbot, A. Boghosian, L. M. Cathles, S. Correa-Legisos, K. N. Darnell, N. Guttenberg, D. M. Holland, and D. R. MacAyeal (2012), Laboratory investigations of iceberg capsize dynamics, energy dissipation and tsunamigenesis, J. Geophys. Res., 117, F01007, doi:10.1029/2011JF002055.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11122/11024
dc.descriptionWe present laboratory experiments designed to quantify the stability and energy budget of buoyancy-driven iceberg capsize.en_US
dc.description.abstractWe present laboratory experiments designed to quantify the stability and energy budget of buoyancy-driven iceberg capsize. Box-shaped icebergs were constructed out of low-density plastic, hydrostatically placed in an acrylic water tank containing freshwater of uniform density, and allowed (or forced, if necessary) to capsize. The maximum kinetic energy (translational plus rotational) of the icebergs was 15% of the total energy released during capsize, and radiated surface wave energy was 1% of the total energy released. The remaining energy was directly transferred into the water via hydrodynamic coupling, viscous drag, and turbulence. The dependence of iceberg capsize instability on iceberg aspect ratio implied by the tank experiments was found to closely agree with analytical predictions based on a simple, hydrostatic treatment of iceberg capsize. This analytical treatment, along with the high Reynolds numbers for the experiments (and considerably higher values for capsizing icebergs in nature), indicates that turbulence is an important mechanism of energy dissipation during iceberg capsize and can contribute a potentially important source of mixing in the stratified ocean proximal to marine ice margins.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding for this project was provided by the U.S. National Science Foundation (ANT0944193, ANT0732869, ANS0806393, and DMR-0807012). D.S.A. was supported by the T. C. Chamberlin Fellowship of the University of Chicago and the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research. We thank the Fultz family for supporting the hydrodynamics laboratory at the University of Chicago. Comments from A. Jenkins, M. Funk, an anonymous reviewer, and editor M. Truffer greatly improved the clarity of this manuscript.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Geophysical Unionen_US
dc.subjecttsunamigenesisen_US
dc.subjecticeberg capsize dynamicsen_US
dc.subjecticebergen_US
dc.subjectgravitational potential energyen_US
dc.subjectfjorden_US
dc.subjecttranslational velocitiesen_US
dc.subjecticeberg stability experimentsen_US
dc.subjectenergy dissipationen_US
dc.titleLaboratory investigations of iceberg capsize dynamics, energy dissipation and tsunamigenesisen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.peerreviewYesen_US
refterms.dateFOA2020-04-28T19:31:41Z
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Geophysical Research Earth Surfaceen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Burton et al 2012 JGR - Jason ...
Size:
2.694Mb
Format:
PDF
Description:
Main Article

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record