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dc.contributor.authorSutherland, D. A.
dc.contributor.authorJackson, R. H.
dc.contributor.authorKienholtz, C.
dc.contributor.authorAmundson, J. M.
dc.contributor.authorDryer, W. P.
dc.contributor.authorDuncan, D.
dc.contributor.authorEidam, E. F.
dc.contributor.authorMotyka, R. J.
dc.contributor.authorNash, J. D.
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-31T19:30:26Z
dc.date.available2020-07-31T19:30:26Z
dc.date.issued2019-07-26
dc.identifier.citationDirect observations of submarine melt and subsurface geometry at a tidewater glacier. D. A. Sutherland, R. H. Jackson, C. Kienholz, J. M. Amundson, W. P. Dryer, D. Duncan, E. F. Eidam, R. J. Motyka and J. D. Nash. Science 365 (6451), 369-374.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11122/11195
dc.descriptionIce loss from the world’s glaciers and ice sheets contributes to sea level rise, influences ocean circulation, and affects ecosystem productivity. Ongoing changes in glaciers and ice sheets are driven by submarine melting and iceberg calving from tidewater glacier margins.en_US
dc.description.abstractIce loss from the world’s glaciers and ice sheets contributes to sea level rise, influences ocean circulation, and affects ecosystem productivity. Ongoing changes in glaciers and ice sheets are driven by submarine melting and iceberg calving from tidewater glacier margins. However, predictions of glacier change largely rest on unconstrained theory for submarine melting. Here, we use repeat multibeam sonar surveys to image a subsurface tidewater glacier face and document a time-variable, three-dimensional geometry linked to melting and calving patterns. Submarine melt rates are high across the entire ice face over both seasons surveyed and increase from spring to summer. The observed melt rates are up to two orders of magnitude greater than predicted by theory, challenging current simulations of ice loss from tidewater glaciers.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipDepartment of Earth Sciences, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403, USA. 2 College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331, USA. 3 Department of Natural Sciences, University of Alaska Southeast, Juneau, AK 99801, USA. 4 Institute for Geophysics, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78758, USA. 5 Department of Marine Sciences, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA. 6 Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK 99775, USA. *Corresponding author. Email: dsuth@uoregon.edu †Present address: Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 08901, USA.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Association for the Advancement of Scienceen_US
dc.subjecttidewater glaciersen_US
dc.subjectmarine-terminating glaciersen_US
dc.subjectLeConte Glacieren_US
dc.subjectice sheetsen_US
dc.subjectsea-level riseen_US
dc.subjectmelting patternsen_US
dc.subjectcalving patternsen_US
dc.subjectmelt ratesen_US
dc.subjectice lossen_US
dc.titleDirect observations of submarine melt and subsurface geometry at a tidewater glacieren_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.peerreviewYesen_US
refterms.dateFOA2020-07-31T19:30:27Z
dc.identifier.journalScienceen_US


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