Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorBradley, Parker T.
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-08T22:29:02Z
dc.date.available2020-10-08T22:29:02Z
dc.date.issued2012-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11122/11309
dc.descriptionThesis (M.S.) University of Alaska Fairbanks, 2012en_US
dc.description.abstractThe Yukon and Tanana rivers are two large, glacially turbid rivers in Alaska, where hydrokinetic projects are being explored for feasibility of electricity production. Downstream migration behavior of fishes in these rivers is poorly understood; as a result, the potential impacts of hydrokinetic devices, which will be placed in the deepest and fastest part of the river, on fishes are unknown. Downstream migrating fishes were sampled during the ice-free season along the river margins of the Yukon River in 2010 and the river margins and mid-channel of the Tanana River in 2011. Results suggest that the river margins in the Yukon and Tanana rivers are primarily utilized by resident freshwater species, the mid-channel is utilized by Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) smolts, and only chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) smolts utilize both of these areas. Some species exhibited distinct peaks and trends in downstream migration timing including longnose suckers (Catostomus catostomus), whitefishes (Coregonine), Arctic grayling (Thymallus arcticus), lake chub (Couesius plumbeus), Chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha), coho salmon (O. kisutch), and chum salmon. As a result of these fishes' downstream migration behavior, hydrokinetic devices installed in surface waters of the middle of the river channel will have the most potential interactions with Pacific salmon smolts during their downstream migration to the ocean from May through July.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjecthydroelectric generatorsen_US
dc.subjectenvironmental aspectsen_US
dc.subjectAlaskaen_US
dc.subjectTanana Riveren_US
dc.subjectsmall scale hydropoweren_US
dc.subjectYukon Riveren_US
dc.subjectfishesen_US
dc.subjecteffect of human beingsen_US
dc.titleCharacterizing the fish community in turbid Alaskan rivers to assess potential interactions with hydrokinetic devicesen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.type.degreemsen_US
dc.identifier.departmentFisheries Divisionen_US
dc.contributor.chairSeitz, Andrew
dc.contributor.committeeSutton, Trent
dc.contributor.committeeMcPhee, Megan
dc.contributor.committeeBurr, John
refterms.dateFOA2020-10-08T22:29:03Z


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Bradley_P_2012.pdf
Size:
3.595Mb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record