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dc.contributor.authorHarrington, Andrew M.
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-16T22:14:41Z
dc.date.available2020-10-16T22:14:41Z
dc.date.issued2011-05
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11122/11362
dc.descriptionThesis (M.S.) University of Alaska Fairbanks, 2011en_US
dc.description.abstractOver the past 50 years, numerous approaches exploring the recreation experience have offered a multitude of concepts and terminology, resulting in a debate over which best represent recreation behavior. This study adopts one of these approaches, the motivational approach, and explores its underpinning theory, expectancy-valence; addresses its limitations presented in the literature; and investigates the potential for the integration with other approaches. A modified analytic induction methodology was applied to address five hypotheses developed to address study questions. Longitudinal, qualitative data were collected through two separate interviews one week apart with 16 individuals that captured their thoughts regarding their recreation activities. A codebook was developed and a kappa statistic revealed an acceptable (K = 0.61 to 0.80) level of inter-coder reliability. Codes were developed based on constructs from the expectancy-valence framework prior to examining the transcripts. Evidence of these codes in the transcripts provided support for the theory. Consistent with modified analytic induction, some hypotheses were confirmed, while one was modified when evidence to the contrary was found. Further examination of the data revealed the potential for integration of other approaches.en_US
dc.description.tableofcontents1. Introduction -- 1.1. Purpose of study -- 1.2. Study hypotheses -- 2. Study background -- 2.1. Introduction -- 2.2. Motivational approach -- 2.3. Optimal experience or multiphasic approach -- 2.4. Meanings-based approach -- 2.5. Limitations and integration of approaches -- 3. Method -- 3.1. Study concept -- 3.2. Pilot studies -- 3.3. Study method -- 3.3.1. Study design overview -- 3.3.2. Sampling -- 3.3.3. Analysis -- 4. Results -- 4.1. Development of the codebook and tests of inter-coder reliability -- 4.1.1. Interview and sample results -- 4.1.2. Coding, development of the codebook, and Kappa statistic -- 4.2. Outcome-consistency results -- 4.2.1. Similar themes across participants: "Recreation benefits my work." -- 4.2.2. Converging patterns of unique/similar motivations across individuals -- 4.2.3. Flexible recreation activities with enduring motivations -- 4.2.4. Pre-activity motivations expressed as benefits -- 4.2.5. High level of consistency between pre-activity motivations and post-activity benefits -- 4.3. Support for hypotheses -- 4.4. Modification of hypotheses -- 5. Discussion and conclusion -- 5.1. Discussion -- 5.2. Conclusions -- 5.2.1. Management implications -- References.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectoutdoor recreationen_US
dc.subjectdecision makingen_US
dc.subjectpsychologyen_US
dc.subjectwell-beingen_US
dc.titleHuman well-being in recreation: an investigation of the expectancy-valence theoryen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.type.degreemsen_US
dc.identifier.departmentDepartment of Resources Managementen_US
refterms.dateFOA2020-10-16T22:14:42Z


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