• Resources, support, and advocacy for Alaskan secondary school students who identify as LGBTQIA+

      Nickell, Jasmine L.; Gifford, Valerie; Dahl, Heather; Wilson, Hilary (2017-05)
      This comprehensive literature review presents findings associated with the needs of students in grades 7-12 who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, questioning, intersex, and/or asexual (LGBTQIA+). In addition, the roles of school counselors, faculty, and staff in addressing these needs are discussed, and policy decisions and legislation supporting safe and inclusive environments are examined. A comprehensive guidebook is included which explains the legislative process that can be used to promote systems change in order to address these needs. The legislative proposal in this guidebook would mandate Alaskan school counselors receive proper training, resources, and guidance to appropriately support and advocate for students who identify as LGBTQIA+. Although there are legislative bills currently being introduced to the Alaska Legislature that support more inclusive anti-discrimination state-based laws, Alaska has yet to pass such a bill and its efforts remain inadequate concerning the institution of state law preventing bullying, discrimination, and violence in schools based on a student's gender identity, gender expression, and/or sexual.
    • School counselors: preparing transitioning high school students

      McGinty, Jolene M. (2016)
      Without preparedness for possible career avenues after graduation, many youth struggle with career paths they may want to investigate. even the considerably prepared students are uncertain what they are going to do after high school. having transition classes starting in middle school can further enhance students' career paths once they graduate from high school. this project focuses on rural school counselors helping to prepare high school students transition into possible career opportunities. rural school counselors often have additional advocate duties to help keep a positive connectedness between students and their schools. increased connectedness and transition classes can make the transition process much more manageable for students after they graduate from high school (Grimes, Haskins, & Paisley, 2013).