The following programs are included in Graduate Education:

  • Cross Cultural Education
  • Curriculum & Instruction
  • Language & Literacy
  • Online Innovation & Design
  • People, Place & Pedagogy

Collections in this community

Recent Submissions

  • Critical issues in the preparation of Alaska Native teachers : perspectives of cross-cultural education development (X-CED) program graduates

    Tetpon, Bernice; Barnhardt, Ray; Lipka, Jerry; Kawagley, Oscar; Smith, David; Mohatt, Gerald (1998-12)
    This study draws upon the experiences of 35 Alaska Native teachers who have succeeded in earning a teaching certificate through the Cross-Cultural Education Development (X-CED) Program to identify issues that affect the preparation of Native teachers for schools in rural Alaska. The guiding question of the study is: What do Native teacher eduation graduates perceive to be the factors that contributed most to their success in a field-based teacher preparation program and as teachers? Components of the question include: Why did Native students pursue a teaching credential? How did the XCED graduates go about achieving their goals? And, how do they perceive their experiences as teachers? It is evident from this study that Alaska Native people face many critical issues in their pursuit of a Bachelors degree and a teaching certificate to teach in their communities. Factors that contribute to the success of the Native teachers interviewed in this study include field-based instructors; locally driven curriculum; and school district, community, family and fellow student support. Implications for future success of Native teacher preparation efforts conclude the study.
  • A Place-based study of Alaskan animals

    Heslop, Emma; Hogan, Maureen; Hornig, Joan; Kardash, Diane (2020-12)
    In the spring of 2020, my second-grade class, located in Fairbanks, AK, dived into a place-based exploration of Alaskan animals. The aim of the project was to increase students’ connections and understanding of the state where they live (Alaska) and the animals that they share it with. Through a backwards design, inquiry-based instructional model, my students met state standards with an integrated-subject approach. With art, guest speakers, research, and field trips my students learned about the Animals that share Alaska with us, their environments, and their adaptations. Students used informational writing published on digital mediums to share their knowledge with others. I propose to share this unit with other educators in the form of a website with links and lesson plans so that more teachers and children have access to quality place-based materials that align to state standards.
  • Applying the environmental identity development model in place-based education: an online resource guide

    Blake, Margaret R.; Green, Carie; Hogan, Maureen; Conner, Laura (2020-12)
    I created an online resource guide for place-based education (PBE) informed by the Environmental Identity Development (EID) Model and research (Green et al., 2016). The EID Model provides a flexible framework for understanding how individuals develop their sense of self within and in relation to the natural world. The model is valuable as a diagnostic tool and a guide in the creation of place-based activities that support children’s play, learning, and growth in nature. The goals of this project were to create an accessible guide to understanding the EID Model and theory; to demonstrate how the EID Model and research may be used in the development of culturally relevant educational strategies; to utilize the EID Model in the creation and curation of effective and flexible PBE activities. Qualitative data from the EID research project were used to explain and contextualize the EID Model. Place-based pedagogies and land education pedagogies were utilized in the development of educational resources. The educational resources created for the website are accessible and flexible, adaptable for diverse ages and environments. The website encourages adults to support “spontaneous” child-initiated activities and explorations in the natural world. Ultimately, this guide is an accessible resource that encourages educators to utilize the EID Model in the pursuit of culturally responsive and child-centered PBE in their own context.
  • Building confidence and competence through the Environmental Identity Development model

    Farris, Kyle W.; Green, Carie; Topkok, Sean; Supanick, Virginia (2020-05)
    The integration of place-based environmental education into an existing educational program has the ability to drastically increase the environmental competencies of the participating members. A unique group of students, who are also potential candidates for leadership roles in the United States Military, are members of the Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) program. These students are required to obtain a massive amount of knowledge and ability in a relatively limited time, while still being required to succeed in the degree program of their choice. By introducing them to the Environmental Identity Development model (Green, 2018), there is a better opportunity for them to identify their own competencies and confidence as they act as leaders in a natural environmental setting, and work towards bettering their own ability to perform, and succeed when operating in a field environment. Successful progression through this model will enable them to acquire new skills and appreciations for the natural world, a world in which they will be expected to be active and engaging leaders in our country’s military forces.
  • Video feedback efficacy at Romig Middle School

    Fliss, Christopher D.; Topkok, Sean; Lott, Chris; Peterson, Don (2019-12)
    Romig Middle School in Anchorage, Alaska, is consistently ranked within the top ten most diverse middle schools in the nation. The main objective of this research will be to determine if video production students meet learning objectives better or worse with video feedback given. The secondary goal is to measure the efficacy of using video feedback as a delivery source of evaluation to students at the eighth-grade level. The methods involve pre-and-post class surveys on the feedback methods and quantitative data gathered on improved technique. The results of this research will guide the use of video feedback in video production classes and serve as a platform to expand video feedback delivery into technology classes.
  • What is the story of this place? Exploring a community through digital storytelling

    Calvert, Lacey; Green, Carie; Hogan, Maureen; Via, Skip (2019-05)
    Place-based curriculum is essential to educating children about their communities, local environment, and landscape. The purpose of this place-based curriculum project was to provide learners experiences with local people, places, and things that reside outside the classroom, while addressing South Dakota history and social studies curriculum standards. This project used the online digital Story Maps platform along with written lesson plans to create a third-grade social studies curriculum that highlighted the local geography, history, and culture of the city of Aberdeen, SD, and surrounding area through a place-based educational lens. The elementary school students (and teachers) will have access to this material through a shared online access website (www.storymaps.arcgis.com). Through this project, I hope to facilitate students’ place attachment to a specific geographic location (Aberdeen) and support them in developing a sense of belonging and community.
  • What does the required curriculum of a NASPAA accredited master of public administration (MPA) program typically look like?

    Mackey, Emil Robert III; Roehl, Roy; Gering, Carol; Noble, Diane (2015)
    This research builds upon prior MPA Curriculum Research and regarding what the required curriculum of a Network of Schools of Public Policy, Affairs, and Administration (NASPAA) accredited Master of Public Administration (MPA) Program typically looks like. This research uses a mixed methods approach where qualitative Grounded Theory methods identify and classify required courses by course name. Quantitative methods calculates frequencies o f distribution and, combined with b rief qualitative statements, explain the typical NASPAA accreditation requirements across programs. This research is useful to understand the transformation of the MPA core requirements since 1989 and for existing and aspiring NASPAA accredited programs to plan and/or evaluate their required curriculum against the typically required core curriculum of NASPAA accredited programs as of 2013. Generally, this research identifies seven common requirements in a typical NASPAA accredited program of study, an average and range o f typical required credit hours per program, and discusses this research in relation to prior research, NASPAA accreditation standards, and the categories of courses typically required by 50% or more of NASPAA accredited programs in this research.
  • Elim's cultural values: reaffirming and implementing indigenous values in education

    Marchant, Samantha C. (2017-12)
    The curriculum project Elim's Cultural Values: Reaffirming and Implementing Indigenous Values in Education was brought to light through community-based participatory action research. Through informal interviews, survey analysis and discussions with local residents of Elim, Alaska; Elim's Cultural Values were identified and implemented into local curriculum. The Indigenous values of the community of Elim are a combination of both Yup'ik and Inupiaq heritage. These values have been carefully laid out into a set of forty separate lessons, (ten cultural value units) in which educators in the local school can implement culturally relevant lessons that connect with the Bering Strait School District curriculum. This project is a living curriculum, currently being piloted in Elim's Kindergarten classroom. It seeks to utilize the many resources we have in our school and community in hopes of reaffirming Elim's cultural values within both school and community.
  • Teacher-led professional development in arts and culture: promoting teacher ability to engage students using their place

    King, Sandra J. (2017)
    This project is a piece of the SILKAT (Sustaining Indigenous and Local Knowledge, Arts, and Teaching) Grant that is funded by Margaret A. Cargill Philanthropies. It describes the development of one of the professional developments modules as well as two of the cultural art units that make up the Professional Development Course and Cultural K-12 Art Curriculum that are being created for the Bering Strait School District as (BSSD) a part of this grant. The professional development module described leads teachers through learning the core practice of "engaging students with their place." This is extremely valuable in all areas, but especially the BSSD, as the schools are very remote, located in Alaska Native villages off of the road system. The art units will address the cultural values of "understanding others" and "hard-work/self-sufficiency." These values will be reinforced using appropriate studio habits of mind that are transferable skills to any content or situation.
  • How to guide: implementing place based learning into the classroom

    Howard, Elisha (2017-12)
    New teachers to rural Alaska may have a difficult time integrating place-based education into their classroom while still using the mandated curriculum provided by their school district. Teachers may also have a hard time relating to their students because they are new to the community and culture. There are limited resources to help teachers learn how to implement place-based education into the curriculum given. Therefore, a how-to guide would be helpful to rural Alaska teachers. This how-to guide will include: Part I. Before Instruction, Part II. Adapting Instruction, Part III. Finding Resources, and Part IV. After the Lessons: Assessments.
  • SILKAT arts and place-based core teaching practice: workshop approach and cultural arts units development

    Ellis, Megan (2017-12)
    The work presented in this project is representative of the goals of the SILKAT (Sustaining Indigenous and Local Knowledge, Arts and Teaching) project, which is a collaborative effort between the University of Alaska Fairbanks and the Bering Strait School District, to create culturally responsive professional development for teachers, and cultural arts units for students. This work is the presentation of one professional development module for the core practice of having the ability to facilitate a workshop approach in the classroom where different students, or groups of students are doing different things at the same time. It is also a presentation of two cultural arts units, grade 11-Outdoor Survival, and kindergarten-Respect for Animals. The research and literature review that supports the creation and highlights the importance of this project is followed by a description of the methodology in which the module and units were developed. Included in this presentation are plans for project dissemination for the Bering Strait School District, as well as the web content from each component.
  • Enriching teaching practice through place, arts and culture: resources for in-service teachers of the Bering Strait School District

    Child, Robin L. (2017-12)
    The SILKAT (Sustaining Indigenous and Local Knowledge, Art and Teaching) project joins together the University of Alaska Fairbanks and the Bering Strait School District in an effort to celebrate the rich cultural arts and Indigenous knowledge of northwest Alaska and bring the knowledge and ingenuity of local artists and culture-bearers to the forefront of teaching practices and curriculum. This work presents the content and format of one teacher professional development module based on one of seven arts and place-based core teaching practices-the ability to elicit student thinking and facilitate reflective thinking in students. It also examines the development of two Art and Culture units, grade 3-Natural Landforms, and grade 5-Responsibility to Community, both rooted in the cultural values and knowledge of artists and culture-bearers from the region. The research completed for this project examines the supporting literature that forms the backbone for both the professional development module and the Art and Culture units, including core practices, the implications of place and culture-based arts education, Visible Thinking routines, protocols, Studio Habits of Thinking, and Understanding by Design. Following the research is a synopsis of the methods used to create the PD module and Art and Culture units, as well as the plans for dissemination within the Bering Strait School District to enhance the skills and knowledge of in-service teachers in arts and culture.
  • The use of social network analysis by school librarians to evaluate and improve collaborative networks in their secondary schools: a pilot study

    Rinio, Deborah; Jacobsen, Gary; Adams, Barbara; Stanley, Sarah; Richey, Jean; Gerlich, Bella (2018-05)
    Social capital, in the form of relationships among teachers, results in sharing information and resources, which leads to improved student academic achievement. As schools continue to seek out ways to improve performance, social capital is often overlooked in favor of development of human capital in the form of professional development and training. Schools that have implemented collaborative groups have the potential to increase social capital, but often fail to structure the groups intentionally or evaluate their outcomes. School librarians in secondary schools often face challenges when it comes to collaboration. The job of a school librarian is inherently collaborative. To effectively serve the school's population, school librarians must understand the needs of their community. To teach information literacy skills, they must have access to students, typically via classroom teachers. Not surprisingly, collaboration between teachers and librarians is a major focus of both professional and research literature, yet librarians report it is one of their biggest challenges. Librarians are urged to start small, work with the teachers who are willing, and hope that others in the school will see the value of collaboration; in other words, build it and they will come. This research sought to determine if school librarians could use social network analysis as an evaluative and strategic planning tool. This study used a mixed-methods approach in a three-phase process to collect social network survey data in two secondary schools, develop the Social Network Analysis for School Librarians (SNASL) Process, and pilot test the process with the school librarians in the pilot schools using participatory analysis. Analysis revealed that the SNASL Process has the potential to enable school librarians to evaluate and improve upon the collaborative network of their school by identifying individuals in specific role positions and producing generative insight regarding the structure of the school network.
  • Alaska Native scholars: a mixed methods investigation of factors influencing PhD attainment

    Jones, Alberta J.; Barnhardt, Ray; Vinlove, Amy; Leonard, Beth; Roehl, Roy (2018-05)
    This study entitled, "Alaska Native Scholars: A Mixed Methods Investigation of Factors Influencing PhD Attainment," investigates the contributing factors influencing the attainment of PhD degrees by Alaska Natives. Originating from a cross-section of rural and urban Alaska communities and tribal ethnicities, this group of scholars attended graduate schools throughout the country. Today many of these PhDs work in universities, conduct research, and advocate for Indigenous people in various leadership roles, both in and outside of Alaska. This study's assumption is these PhD graduates have gained valuable lessons along their path to success and an examination of these factors is relevant to advancing that successs. The findings analyze results from a survey instrument with approximately a 92% response rate from all living Alaska Native PhD/EdD graduates that were able to be located at the time, up to early 2015. Survey participants shared personal, demographic, cultural, social, academic, and economic factors both supporting and hindering PhD attainment. Survey data was validated by ten personal interviews with PhDs from eight different Alaska Native tribes. One goal of this study was to increase our knowledge of the circumstances and factors of Alaska Native doctoral graduates and to build upon knowledge necessary to increase interest and enrollment of Alaska Native PhD graduates. Some questions examined by this study are: What sets of factors do AN PhDs have in common which led to their success? What challenges and barriers are specific to the Alaska Native demographics? If patterns of successful factors exist, can these factors be replicated to expand Alaska Native participation in PhD or other graduate programs? Are there 'lessons learned' in terms of aiding university PhD programs in attracting and graduating Alaska Native students? A stronger PhD representation of this population has implications for leadership, education, business, and policy-making roles serving to increase Indigenous self-determination. Additionally, this research has implications for universities seeking to address gaps in Alaska Native and American Indian faculty representation.
  • Socioeconomic factors that lead to Latino male students leaving school before graduating

    D'Agostino, Joseph C.; Wong, Nga-Wing Anjela; Barnhardt, Raymond; Armstrong, Anne Brenner (2012-05)
    Students of color make up a predominant number of learners that leave high school before graduating (National Center for Education Research, 2009). I selected to study Latino males to narrow the scope of my research. The literature I reviewed pointed directly at socioeconomics as one of the primary factors. I feel there are more specific factors involved for many of the individuals impacted. I used a qualitative approach and utilized an anonymous survey and individual interviews to pinpoint some of these factors. The findings from my research further supported that socioeconomics were a leading factor. My data and literature review showed that school environment and stereotyping/discrimination also played a role. I intend to conduct further research to identify the additional sub-factors that are most prevalent to Latino males. My long-term goal is to provide information to my peers that can assist in the construction or reconstruction of programs that can offer the best support for these students.
  • Alaska Native females: understanding body image dissatisfaction in a culturally diverse country

    Naegele, Karaline M.; Cook, Christine; Renes, Susan; Harrison, Lynn (2013-05)
    The current study was conducted to expand literature on body image dissatisfaction (BID) in Alaska Native females. As BID has been a concern for European American females, and many minority groups in America, professionals should examine all cultural groups for the presence of BID. The research was comprised of qualitative interviewing methods. Interviews were conducted with Alaska Native female participants between the ages of 18 and 23 years, attending the University of Alaska Fairbanks. Research questions addressed whether or not Alaska Native females experience BID, and if so how BID develops and manifests for this population. The study found that all participants experienced BID beginning in adolescence. The development and manifestation of BID varied on an individual basis, reflecting other research findings.
  • Updating the art history curriculum: incorporating virtual and augmented reality technologies to improve interactivity and engagement

    Bender, Brook; Healy, Joanne; Via, Skip; Lott, Chris (2017-05)
    This project investigates how the art history curricula in higher education can borrow from and incorporate emerging technologies currently being used in art museums. Many art museums are using augmented reality and virtual reality technologies to transform their visitors' experiences into experiences that are interactive and engaging. Art museums have historically offered static visitor experiences, which have been mirrored in the study of art. This project explores the current state of the art history classroom in higher education, which is historically a teacher-centered learning environment and the learning effects of that environment. The project then looks at how art museums are creating visitor-centered learning environments; specifically looking at how they are using reality technologies (virtual and augmented) to transition into digitally interactive learning environments that support various learning theories. Lastly, the project examines the learning benefits of such tools to see what could (and should) be implemented into the art history curricula at the higher education level and provides a sample section of a curriculum demonstrating what that implementation could look like. Art and art history are a crucial part of our culture and being able to successfully engage with it and learn from it enables the spread of our culture through digital means and of digital culture.
  • Strengths-based analysis of student success in online courses

    Gering, Carol; Sheppard, Dani'; Morotti, Allan; Adams, Barbara; Renes, Susan (2017-08)
    The purpose of this research was to increase understanding of post-secondary student success in online courses by evaluating a contextually rich combination of personal, circumstantial, and course variables. A strengths-based perspective framed the investigation. Mixed-method data were collected and analyzed sequentially in three phases: two phases of quantitative collection and analysis were followed by qualitative interviews and comprehensive analysis. The study first used logistic regression to analyze existing data on more than 27,000 student enrollments, spanning a time period of four academic years. The second phase of research enhanced the modeling focused on a subset of the total population; students from a single semester were invited to complete an assessment of non-cognitive attributes and personal perceptions. Between the two phases, 28 discreet variables were analyzed. Results suggest that different combinations of variables may be effective in predicting success among students with varying levels of educational experience. This research produced preliminary predictive models for student success at each level of class standing. The study concluded with qualitative interviews designed to explain quantitative results more fully. Aligned with a strengths-based perspective, 12 successful students were asked to elaborate on factors impacting their success. Themes that emerged from the interviews were congruent with quantitative findings, providing practical examples of student and instructor actions that contribute to online student success.

View more