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Browsing Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station (AFES) by Issue Date

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Browsing Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station (AFES) by Issue Date

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  • Chamberlin, Joseph C. (Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1949-06)
    In Alaska, as in every other agricultural area of the world, insect pests compete in many way with the farmer for the fruit of his labors. Under certain conditions many plants may be killed or consumed outright. More ...
  • Sweetman, William J.; Hodgson, H.J.; Mick, A.H. (Agricultural Experiment Stations, University of Alaska, 1950-06)
    Ih Alaska— Oats-and-peas make better silage than hay / Silage and silos pay / Field-choppers cut labor costs / Smooth bromegrass is an excellent forage / Alsike clover and Hubam sweetclover / make good annuals / Better ...
  • McCurdy, Richard E.; Johnson, Hugh A. (Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1951-03)
    During the summer of 1950, an intensive study was made on the Kenai Peninsula to determine the extent of its agricultural development and the plans and problems of current settlers. All available settlers residing in ...
  • Litzenberger, S.C.; Bensin, B.M. (Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1951-04)
    Edda, an introduction from Sweden, was recommended for the first tim e in 195 I for all barley-growing areas of Alaska. About 200 bushels of this new barley variety were available for distribution to Alaska growers in ...
  • Sweetman, William J.; Middleton, Wallace R.; Swingle, Fred (Alaska Agricultural Experiment Stations, 1951-05)
    Raise Your Calf Right— Feed your freshening cow / Take care of your freshening cow / Give ihe Calf a good place to live / Teach the calf to drink right away / Start your calf on grain early / Feed your calf ...
  • Johnson, Hugh A. (Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, University of Alaska, 1951-11)
  • Moore, Clarence A. (University of Alaska, Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1952-01)
  • Dearborn, C.H. (University of Alaska, Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1952-05)
    Weed control studies at the Matanuska Experiment Station during the past two seasons have shown that many garden and field crops can be weeded satisfactorily with chemioals. Killing weeds with chemicals promises many ...
  • Johnson, Hugh A. (University of Alaska, Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1953-02)
  • Washburn, Richard H. (University of Alaska, Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1953-02)
    The turnip maggot, seed-corn maggot and onion maggot are the root maggots of economic importance in Alaska. They feed on crucifers, crucifers and other crops, and onions, respectively. The damage they cause can be ...
  • Hodgson, H.J.; Wilder, William B.; Osguthorpe, John E. (University of Alaska, Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1953-02)
    Since fanning in Alaska first began and especially since dairy farming became the primary agricultural industry, there has existed a need for hardy legumes which would survive Alaska winters and produce satisfactory ...
  • Johnson, Hugh A. (University of Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1953-09)
  • Branton, C. I.; Fahnestock, C. R. (University of Alaska, Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1953-11)
  • Johnson, Hugh A.; Stanton, Keith L. (School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, 1955-07)
    The Matanuska Valley was created through action of ice, water and wind. When the last glaciers retreated up the Susitna, the Knik and the Matanuska valleys, vegetation began cove ring the scars, Over several centuries ...
  • Sweetman, William J.; Branton, C. Ivan (School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, 1955-09)
    Dairying in Alaska probably will always be confined to areas where milk can reach city markets readily. The demand £or fresh milk, even at present prices, exceeds the supply. Probably the dairy farmer always will be able ...
  • Taylor, R.L.; Brinsmade, J.C. (University of Alaska, Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1955-10)
    Developed from the hybrid Diamond x Khogot by the Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, Gasser wheat was released to seed producers in 1955. This variety exhibits an excellent combination of high yield and agronomic ...
  • Andrews, Richard A.; Johnson, Hugh A. (School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, 1956-10)
    An analysis of commercial farming in Alaska has long been needed. This report may supply helpful information. It spans the yea rs from 1949 to 1954, a time of rapid development and growth. T he study analyzes detailed ...
  • Johnson, Hugh A.; Coffman, Robert J. (School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, 1956-11)
    The Kenai Peninsula is an Alaskan Mecca for many venturesome families newly arrived from the States. They flock there each year searching for " free" land and fresh opportunity in a new country. Business at the Anchorage ...
  • Babb, M. F.; Dearborn, C. H. (School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, 1957-06)
    This bulletin reports the results of potato variety trials conducted at the Matanuska Experiment Station during 1948, 1949, 1950, and 1951. They were conducted for the purpose of determining the value of the more common ...
  • Unknown author (University of Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1958-09)
    ALASKA'S agriculture is a growing industry. In 1957 some $4 1/2 million worth of food and feed grown by 200 full-time and 350 part-time farmers brought nearly $9 million in the market place. Crop volume doubled between ...

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